Emily Gertz
at 06:27 AM Jul 25 2014

The Space Shuttle Columbia carried the Chandra X-ray Observatory into space on July 23, 1999. To commemorate the telescope's quinceañera, NASA has released four beautiful new images of supernova remnants, processed from Chandra's readings, that showcase the observatory's capabilities.

Sarah Fecht
at 11:48 AM Jul 24 2014

Forty-five years ago, on July 20, 1969, Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin made the first footprints on the Moon, and it was epic. Popular Science covered this enormous achievement with an article by Wernher von Braun– a German-born engineer, now known as "The Father of Rocket Science,"  who built the Saturn V launch vehicle that brought Apollo to the Moon. In our July 1969 issue, he described the plans for Armstrong and Aldrin's two-hour rendevous with the Moon.

Sarah Fecht
at 06:50 AM Jul 19 2014
Space // 

Or at least, rubber-duck shaped. Sesame St's Ernie would be most excited.

Francie Diep
at 11:16 AM Jul 17 2014
Space // 

Meet Lebanon, an iron meteorite that NASA's Curiosity rover ran into on its 640th sol (Martian day) on Mars. Back here on Earth, it was May 25, 2014.

Sarah Fecht
at 08:35 AM Jul 16 2014

Who will make our sandwiches in space? In the 1960s, the vision of the perfect female astronaut was as a space mom—a woman who would cook and clean and sew spacesuits, all while using her bounteous uterus to give birth to the little boys and girls who would populate the final frontier.

Francie Diep
at 07:38 AM Jul 15 2014
Space // 

The ground in Elysium is made of volcanic flows. That's according to the newest geologic map of Mars, above, from the U.S. Geological Survey. Elysium Planitia is a named feature on Mars, but we're guessing the area is rather drier than the mythical Elysium that Homer described as a meadowed paradise.

Sarah Fecht
at 09:46 AM Jul 11 2014

Technically, the galaxies have probably existed for billions of years, but these seven had slipped under the radar until now. They’re dwarf galaxies, so-named because they contain only a few billion stars, compared to galaxies such as our own Milky Way, which may contain up to 400 billion stars. Dwarfs are the most abundant galaxies in the universe, but they’re hard to detect because their light is dim and diffuse.

 
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