Francie Diep
at 09:56 AM Apr 15 2014

Update, 4/14/14: The SpaceX launch that was supposed to bring Robonaut 2 its legs has been postponed. The Falcon 9 rocket has a helium leak, NASA tweeted. R2 responded to the news on Twitter:

Kelsey D. Atherton
at 09:56 AM Apr 15 2014
Drones // 

Before the Predator attached the name "drone" to an anti-terror war machine, many militaries flew unmanned planes as targets, so that pilots and anti-aircraft gunners could practice shooting moving objects. Target drones are still flown today, both specific target models and ones converted from old jets specifically for this purpose. In the past, targets were generally plane-sized, and militaries used anti-aircraft weapons to shoot them down.

Douglas Main
at 07:00 AM Apr 10 2014
Robots // 

These DNA machines (or origami robots, so-called since they can unfold and deliver drugs stored within) carry fluorescent markers, allowing researchers to tell where in the roach's body they are traveling and what they are doing. Incredibly, the "accuracy of delivery and control of the nanobots is equivalent to a computer system," New Scientist reported.

Kelsey D. Atherton
at 11:58 AM Apr 8 2014
Drones // 

Here's a roundup of the week's top drone news, designed to capture the military, commercial, non-profit, and recreational applications of unmanned aircraft.

Kelsey D. Atherton
at 03:31 AM Mar 26 2014
Tech // 

There are generally threeways to improve an explosive weapon: make the explosion bigger so it's guaranteed to hit the target;improve its precision so that it doesn't hit anything but the target;or shapethe explosion so that when it goes off,it travels in a specificdirection. Over the past12 years, as the major war effortof both the United States and the United Kingdom has been fighting small groups of insurgents that operate in civilian areas, weapons engineers placed aheavy emphasison the latter two strategies.

Kelsey D. Atherton
at 02:00 AM Mar 22 2014
Tech // 

Here's a roundup of the week's top drone news, designed to capture the military, commercial, non-profit, and recreational applications of unmanned aircraft.

Erik Sofge
at 03:22 AM Mar 13 2014
Tech // 

Looking back, Google’s emergence as a robotics powerhouse seems obvious—and inevitable. First came the scattered hires of roboticists and the release of self-driving cars into Bay Area traffic. Then, the search giant reportedly bought two humanoid HUBO robots from South Korean university KAIST. But it wasn’t until December’srevelation that Google had acquired eight robotics companies—including Boston Dynamics, maker of BigDog, WildCat and a stableof other astonishing Pentagon-funded bots—that it became clear: Google means to build robots.

 
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