Kelsey D. Atherton
at 10:24 AM Jul 29 2016
Drones // 

No one wants a drone-related accident. The best way to ensure that one doesn't happen is to make sure everyone with a drone flies responsibly. Failing that, the second-best option could be a system of sensors and jammers that detects drones within a certain area and then sends them home.

Dave Gershgorn
at 13:05 PM Jul 28 2016

In artificial intelligence research, everyone is talking about style transfer. It takes traits from one piece of art, like the brushstrokes of a painting, and applies it to another image. It's the software behind the popular photo app Prisma, and Twitter bots like the now-defunct DeepForger.

Dave Gershgorn
at 13:05 PM Jul 28 2016

Artificial intelligence lets us offload tasks onto machines—they're beginning to tag our photos, drive our cars, and fly our drones. These A.I. systems occasionally make wrong decisions while doing these things, as speculated in the recent Tesla Autopilot crash or mishearing a voice command, but new research suggests that hackers with experience in A.I. could force these algorithms to make wrong and potentially harmful decisions.

Thom Leavy
at 13:05 PM Jul 28 2016

There are innumerable blogs dedicated to posting prose and poetry. CuratedAI, however, is a collection of machine generated creative writing that launched last week. ​The poems and prose come from multiple different artificial intelligence programs selected by human beings. If the Turing Test is a (debatably) subjective way to measure a machine's passable humanity, then poetry is the subjective cheat sheet.

Kelsey D. Atherton
at 13:05 PM Jul 28 2016
Robots // 

Blimps are gigantic sky-whales. By the very nature of their design, a durable yet light sack of air suspending a small, heavier compartment with people and engines, there's a lot of surface area on a blimp and not a great way to look at it. So Skunk Works, the research laboratory of defense giant Lockheed Martin, went and did the only sensible thing: made a robot that can crawl on the surface of blimps.

Samantha Cole
at 09:34 AM Jul 26 2016

We already interact with artificial intelligence in our daily lives. Furby and Clippy were early forms; driverless cars and Facebook's chatbots pick up the mantle today. But if AI is to continue its evolution, it'll have to get more convincingly human. Right now, its capacity for emotional depth is seriously lacking.

Sarah Fecht
at 09:34 AM Jul 26 2016
Robots // 

If the robot rebellion ever happens, it'll be because we're always bullying our machines. But a robot named Taekwondo Personal Trainer (TPT) is actually designed to be kicked.

 
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