Jeffrey Lin and P.W. Singer
at 10:21 AM Sep 28 2016

China Electronics Technology Group Corporation (CETC), China's foremost military electronics company, has announced that its scientists have tested a quantum radar to the range of 100km, beating out known American and German competition by 500%. This is a significant claim to make, as a quantum radar would theoretically be able to detect stealth aircraft at long ranges.

Kelsey D. Atherton
at 11:39 AM Sep 23 2016

Runways are a hassle. Long, flat strips of unobstructed land are work to defend at the best of times, and can't always be found in rugged terrain or on small islands. Yet having a fixed-wing plane fly air support is useful, because plane bodies are faster and much more efficient than helicopters. What's the Marine Corps to do?

Kelsey D. Atherton
at 11:39 AM Sep 23 2016

“Climate change poses a significant and growing threat to national security, both at home and abroad,” declared a memorandum from the White House to the heads of executive departments and agencies. With the United States about to enter its 15th year of fighting against the Taliban in Afghanistan, and with the fight against ISIS in Iraq spilling over into Syria more and more, it may seem odd for the President to direct resources towards a less direct threat. Does it really make sense for the United States military to spend resources on fighting climate change instead of defeating ISIS?

Jeffrey Lin and P.W. Singer
at 11:39 AM Sep 23 2016

The Low Altitude Guard II is a more powerful, mobile follow up to the laser turret, one with potential military applications that goes beyond just shooting down drones to possibly defending against mortar and rocket attacks.

Kelsey D. Atherton
at 15:24 PM Sep 19 2016

Launching a ballistic missile is a solved problem. It was first solved in World War II, when German V-2 rockets flew over 220 miles to rain death on the United Kingdom. During the Cold War, the potential to deliver a nuclear attack with a missile fired from one side of the globe to another led to an arms race, a massive nuclear stockpile, and the category of Intercontinental Ballistic Missiles, or ICBMs. Building an ICBM is also a solved problem, requiring the expertise to make a nuclear warhead and to build a missile body that can effectively deliver it.

Kelsey D. Atherton
at 10:58 AM Sep 2 2016

Let me cut to the landspeeder chase: the US Army is currently working on a hoverbike. Last year, when the Army expressed an interest in the hoverbike, Popular Science wrote about all the previous attempts at smaller, one-or-two person flying machines that the Army's considered. In a rich history spanning mostly the 1950s and 1960s, the Army looked for some way to make an individual soldier airborne, in a useful way. And with a new, proven hoverbike design in the works, it seemed the 2010s could realize the abandoned dream of the 1960s.

Kelsey D. Atherton
at 10:58 AM Sep 2 2016

Weapons aren't designed for disassembly. Mustard agent, commonly referred to as mustard gas, is a deadly chemical weapon that has a similar smell to the condiment. Used widely during World War I, the chemical is dispersed in the air like a mist, where it then melts any flesh it encounters. It's a particularly gross, awful weapon, and one with the added downside of flying back at the people who unleashed it if the wind shifts.

 
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