Rob Verger
at 10:50 AM Apr 28 2017

Our smartphones and other gadgets are powered by lithium-ion batteries, but as companies like Samsung know all too well, those charge-holders can be flammable under the wrong conditions. The hazards of lithium-ion batteries are also a concern for another group, one with a strong incentive to keep fires at bay: the U.S. Navy. Now chemists at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory (NLR) have announced a new battery technology that they say is both safe and rechargeable, and could make its way into electric vehicles, bikes, or ships.

Jeffrey Lin and P.W. Singer
at 10:50 AM Apr 28 2017

The Type 001A aircraft carrier, maneuvered to pierside by tugboats, will be fitted for the next or so with electronics and self defense systems, before being commissioned, followed by embarking an air group, to get up to speed in order to enter service.

Kelsey D. Atherton
at 11:12 AM Apr 18 2017

So, the Pentagon used a massive bomb against caves in eastern Afghanistan that currently house ISIS fighters, and previously housed insurgents fighting against British rule in the 19th century and mujahadeen fighting against Soviet control in the 20th century. For centuries, the caves of Afghanistan have made it difficult for outsiders to control the country. But in the early 21st century, the United States considered developing a brand new weapon to nullify these ancient defenses. The “Robust Nuclear Earth Penetrator” was an earthquake in a can, a nuclear bomb designed to seal the caves once and for all.

Jeffrey Lin and P.W. Singer
at 10:50 AM Feb 24 2017

At the Dubai IDEX defense exposition, arms makers from around the world show off their latest wares. A notable debut at the recent 2017 show: a new, triple hulled Chinese warship design.

Jeffrey Lin and P.W. Singer
at 12:30 PM Feb 20 2017

One of the largest aerospace contracts in the world right now is T-X program, an effort to replace all of the United States' T-38 trainer jets—a.k.a. the aircraft used to train fighter pilots. When counting the potential buys on the foreign export market, some 1,000 new jets are planned for this program.

Kelsey D. Atherton
at 11:27 AM Feb 3 2017

In 1957, the Soviet Union tested the world's first intercontinental ballistic missile. Its harmless payload, the beeping satellite Sputnik, flared bright across the night sky, a reminder to all the world of the missile that put it there. Sixty years later, North Korea is expected to be the fifth country to join that exclusive club, after the United States, China, and India. And while Kim Jong-un's totalitarian state is quiet about the developments, there's enough information available to the public that the question for 2017 isn't will North Korea test a missile, but when?

Jeffrey Lin and P.W. Singer
at 10:15 AM Jan 30 2017

In both Beijing and Washington D.C., nuclear weapons and their delivery systems have become particularly big news lately. In China, the DF-41 Intercontinental Ballistic Missile (ICBM) is already driving in the streets of Manchuria. Stateside, President Trump has just received a briefing at the Pentagon on America's nuclear plans.

 
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