Rob Verger
at 10:50 AM Apr 28 2017

Our smartphones and other gadgets are powered by lithium-ion batteries, but as companies like Samsung know all too well, those charge-holders can be flammable under the wrong conditions. The hazards of lithium-ion batteries are also a concern for another group, one with a strong incentive to keep fires at bay: the U.S. Navy. Now chemists at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory (NLR) have announced a new battery technology that they say is both safe and rechargeable, and could make its way into electric vehicles, bikes, or ships.

Jeffrey Lin and P.W. Singer
at 10:50 AM Apr 28 2017

The Type 001A aircraft carrier, maneuvered to pierside by tugboats, will be fitted for the next or so with electronics and self defense systems, before being commissioned, followed by embarking an air group, to get up to speed in order to enter service.

Stan Horaczek
at 09:25 AM Apr 27 2017
Tech // 

Just last month, Amazon introduced a Prime feature called Outfit Compare which let users upload a pair of selfies showing different outfits to be evaluated by style experts. Today, Amazon has doubled down on its push to guide the style of everyday users with its home assistant and fashion guru, the $200 Echo Look, which can currently only be ordered by invitation.

Kelsey D. Atherton
at 11:12 AM Apr 18 2017

So, the Pentagon used a massive bomb against caves in eastern Afghanistan that currently house ISIS fighters, and previously housed insurgents fighting against British rule in the 19th century and mujahadeen fighting against Soviet control in the 20th century. For centuries, the caves of Afghanistan have made it difficult for outsiders to control the country. But in the early 21st century, the United States considered developing a brand new weapon to nullify these ancient defenses. The “Robust Nuclear Earth Penetrator” was an earthquake in a can, a nuclear bomb designed to seal the caves once and for all.

Rob Verger
at 11:22 AM Apr 7 2017
Tech // 

There's a rush right now for clothing companies—especially those in the outdoor and athletic spaces—to find renewable materials for their wares. Reebok has chosen corn as its preferred sustainable building block for use in an upcoming sneaker, which is part of its Corn + Cotton initiative.

Kendra Pierre-Louis
at 11:22 AM Apr 7 2017

Airplane passengers are in for an increasingly bumpy ride according to a study released today in the journal Advances in Atmospheric Sciences. Climate change is altering the jet stream, making severe turbulence more likely. The study builds on earlier work which found that climate change would lead to bumpier airplane rides. What makes the new research unique is that it quantifies how much different kinds of turbulence will increase—59 percent in the case of light turbulence, a 94 percent increase in moderate turbulence, and 149 percent increase in severe turbulence.

Eleanor Cummins
at 13:05 PM Mar 7 2017
Tech // 

Every year, billions of pounds of apples, wheat, corn, and other food is harvested for us to consume. But as much as 40 percent of this bounty is wasted, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

 
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