Jeffrey Lin and P.W. Singer
at 09:54 AM Jan 25 2017

This picture of a landing gear assembly on a lab test rig shows how big it is; the foot pad's diameter is easily 2.5-3 feet.

Sarah Fecht
at 09:54 AM Jan 25 2017

After a 10-year journey, NASA's New Horizons spacecraft sped past Pluto for just a few short hours in July 2015. It was going far too fast to enter an orbit around the dwarf planet—let alone land on it—but along the way it grabbed some pretty amazing photos of this mysterious world.

Mary Beth Griggs
at 09:44 AM Jan 25 2017
Space // 

We've got a whole new view of our planet. The GOES-16 satellite, launched on November 19, sent back its first pictures of the Earth this week. The satellite—a joint project between NOAA and NASA—is designed to observe conditions here on Earth, capturing images of our planet in an unprecedented 16 channels of light. The different wavelengths will let scientists monitor atmospheric conditions on the planet, helping to improve NOAA's forecasts. It's a big jump forward from previous iterations of the geostationary GOES satellites, which regularly send back images and data of conditions on Earth.

Jeffrey Lin and P.W. Singer
at 09:44 AM Jan 25 2017
Space // 

A Chinese space launch company, Landspace, has won the first Chinese private space launch contract from a foreign company.

Sarah Fecht
at 09:44 AM Jan 25 2017

This team from Israel was the first to book its ticket to the moon. Instead of rolling like a rover, this dishwasher-sized spacecraft will "hop" using retro-thrusters to move 500 meters across the lunar surface. SpaceIL has commissioned a ride with Spaceflight Industries.

Mark D. Kaufman
at 09:02 AM Jan 18 2017
Space // 

Tabby's Star probably isn't surrounded by an energy-sucking alien super-structure. But it may have eaten a nearby planet.

Rachel Feltman
at 10:34 AM Jan 10 2017
Space // 

To look up into the night sky is to gaze deep, deep into the past. Light moves fast, but not fast enough for us to get an instantaneous peek at the cosmos. So when we look at some of the glowing balls of plasma that light up our sky, we're actually seeing them as they looked thousands of years ago. Even the light from our own sun is eight minutes old before it reaches Earth.

 
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