Mary Beth Griggs
at 12:11 PM Jul 20 2017
Space // 

In an effort so astronomically full of cooperation and enthusiasm it could have been scripted, last Sunday, some of the streets near Comodoro Rivadavia, Argentina went dark.

Sarah Fecht
at 09:31 AM Jul 17 2017

A lander like this will fly in Moon Express's first launch, slated for later this year. It can carry up to 66 pounds of equipment and scientific instruments to the lunar surface. Or it can stay in orbit or travel deeper into space.

Mary Beth Griggs
at 09:31 AM Jul 17 2017
Space // 

This week, NASA's Juno spacecraft got an up-close look at that planet's most iconic feature: the Great Red Spot.

Sarah Fecht
at 10:22 AM Jun 28 2017
Space // 

In a new video, the hacker group known as Anonymous claims that NASA has discovered alien life. But before you freak out, let's talk.

Mary Beth Griggs
at 12:34 PM Jun 23 2017

Every few weeks, a telepresence robot rolls by my desk. It's usually a co-worker in a distant office on her way to a meeting, or checking in on the progress of physical things in the office from the comfort of her home.

Rachel Feltman
at 12:34 PM Jun 23 2017
Space // 

It might seem like NASA is announcing a brand-spanking-new "Earth-like" exoplanetconstantly—some far-away world that might possibly maybe have the basic requirements for life as we know it. And it seems that way because, well, that's pretty accurate: it's all thanks to NASA's wildly successful Kepler Space Telescope, which uses the blinking and dimming of distant alien stars to spot planets that might orbit around them. But the latest Kepler finds (219 new planetary candidates, 10 of which are Earth-size and the right distance from their host star to hold liquid water) mark something of an end: this represents the final official planetary search results from Kepler's mission data.

Kendra Pierre-Louis
at 10:00 AM Jun 6 2017

Close your eyes and picture what the Earth looks like. You're probably picturing a circle, mostly blue thanks to the ocean, with swirls of clouds and the occasional green and brown land mass. The entire sphere is floating in a mass of impossible black. You're picturing Earth in a way that you've never actually seen with your own two eyes. Maybe you're getting the sketch from this famous shot, below, known as the blue marble image. Astronauts aboard the Apollo 17 space mission snapped the picture on December 7th, 1972. Countless other images of our home planet have been taken, which have forever shaped our imagination of it. Still, only a handful of humans have seen it with naked eyes.

 
Sign up for the Pop Sci newsletter
Australian Popular Science
ON SALE 03 AUGUST
PopSci Live