Rachel Feltman
at 10:19 AM Apr 26 2017
Pexels
Nature // 

Dogs: We love them. Like, a lot. In fact, humans have been hanging out with doggos for at least 15,000 years or so, and likely a lot longer. Over the course of that long, mutually beneficial friendship, we've done a lot of strange things to our four-legged companions, controlling their reproduction to coax them into breeds that suit our (sometimes absurd) needs.

Kendra Pierre-Louis
at 10:19 AM Apr 26 2017
Pexels
Science // 

Here's the tiniest silver lining to the abysmally black cloud that is climate change: it might finally get Americans to exercise, according to a study released today in the journal Nature Climate Change. When researchers looked at the relationship between weather and workouts, they found that as temperatures increased, so too did physical activity.

Sarah Fecht
at 10:19 AM Apr 26 2017
NASA/Viking 1

Today, during a phone call with astronaut Peggy Whitson on the International Space Station, President Trump joked that he hoped NASA would land astronauts on Mars by the end of his first term in 2020.

Hanna Bolanos
at 10:19 AM Apr 26 2017
Flickr user Daniel Novta
Science // 

Learning to crack an egg is a culinary rite of passage. Do it correctly, and the shell swiftly breaks, spilling the liquid contents out in one fell swoop. Do it wrong, and you end up with yolk on your hands and shell in your bowl. Luckily, science has hatched a formula that is nearly infallible. All it requires is knowledge of a few basic physics principles.

Mary Beth Griggs
at 10:19 AM Apr 26 2017
Federica Bertocchini, Paolo Bombelli, and Chris Howe
Nature // 

Plastic bags are nothing if not persistent—even when we want them to disappear. We've tried banning plastic bags in some cities, or taxing their in others. We've come up with replacements made from shrimp shells or biodegradable plastics, which have failed to seize the marketplace. We've even tried distilling them into fuel and cooking them into nanotubes.

Sarah Fecht
at 11:54 AM Apr 24 2017
Illustration by NASA/JPL-Caltech
Space // 

After 20 years, thousands of gorgeous photos, and a whole lot of science, the Cassini spacecraft is finally ready to retire. But there'll be no relaxing days on the beach for this old spacecraft; instead, it will go out in a blaze of glory. More specifically, NASA's planning to crash it into Saturn's atmosphere, where it will melt and vaporize.

Kendra Pierre-Louis
at 11:54 AM Apr 24 2017
Science // 

The Arctic, in our popular imagination, is a frozen expanse teetering figuratively and literally on the edges of human culture. It remains primal and wild and unsullied by human contagions. It's a nice idea, but one that doesn't match reality.

Sara Chodosh
at 11:54 AM Apr 24 2017
Chevanon Photography

About one in five Americans believes that the Sun revolves around the Earth. And if you happened to collect 12 of those people on a jury in which the orbiting properties of our solar system were up for debate, the headlines about the verdict would probably read “Earth revolves around Sun, declares American jury.” But that wouldn't make it true.

Kelsey D. Atherton
at 11:54 AM Apr 24 2017
Courtney "Coco" Mault, via Flickr. CC BY 2.0

Language is all about repetition. Every word you're reading was created by humans, and then used by other humans, creating and reinforcing context, meaning, the very nature of language. As humans train machines to understand language, they're teaching machines to replicate human bias.

Cici Zhang
at 11:54 AM Apr 24 2017
Pexels

Your biological clock is probably the most reliable machinery in your body: it runs 24-7 to regulate vital functions from sleep to metabolism and remains stubbornly steadfast when you fly across time zones. Scientists still don't know exactly how this this internal clock works. But now researchers have identified a missing gear that could offer a cure for jet lag.

Corinne Iozzio
at 11:54 AM Apr 24 2017
Viryl Technologies
Gadgets // 

Just over two years ago, Rob Brown was transfixed by an eBay auction. He and colleagues Chad Brown (no relation) and James Hashmi were bidding on a record pressing machine. It was the only one the new entrepreneurs could find, and it was in the middle of nowhere—in Russia. No one knew if it worked, or could even be refurbished back into working order. Yet, the bidding was feverish: Brown's team walked away, but the press ultimately sold for some $60,000.

Sara Chodosh
at 11:54 AM Apr 24 2017
Wellcome Images

We eliminated measles in the U.S. in 2000. Somebody should tell the measles. Because even though the virus has no permanent home stateside, it keeps getting in—more and more, it seems.

Jeffrey Lin and P.W. Singer
at 11:54 AM Apr 24 2017
CNSA

At 7:41 p.m. local time, the Tianzhou 1 robotic cargo ship blasted off on a Long March 7 rocket from the Wenchang Space Launch Center on Hainan Island. Now in orbit, it will soon rendezvous with the Tiangong 2 space station, in yet another first for the Chinese space program.

Rob Verger
at 11:54 AM Apr 24 2017
Google

On Thursday, Google announced that its Home smart hub device can now recognize and identify up to six different users by the sound of their voice. It's an inevitable—but crucial—step in the development of smart home virtual assistants. The new skill means that different people in a household will be able to ask the Google Assistant questions about what's on their calendar, or what their commute looks like, and the Home device will know who is speaking to it and give tailored responses. It'll make it a more streamlined experience for families sharing a smart home speaker hub.

Sarah Fecht
at 11:54 AM Apr 24 2017
ESA/Hubble, NASA

Although the night sky often seems so peaceful and still, a closer look reveals constant movement and change. The Intermediate Palomar Transient Factory (iPTF) in California looks for ephemeral phenomena in the heavens, like stars that fluctuate in brightness, or planets passing in front of their stars.

 
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