Francie Diep
at 09:51 AM Oct 15 2014
Nature // 

It's a love story—so who cares if the lovers are a little unattractive? We can't all be Snow Whites and Prince Charmings. I'm talking about the love affair between fruit flies and brewer's yeast, which scientists so kindly described in a paper published last week in the journal Cell Reports.

Loren Grush
at 09:51 AM Oct 15 2014
Nature // 

Lions may be the kings of the animal world, but at least elephants could make for spunky meteorologists. New research is revealing that elephants have a radar-like spidey sense, capable of detecting an approaching rainstorm up to 150 miles off.

Francie Diep
at 07:30 AM Oct 14 2014
Nature // 

We may hate our invasive cane toads, they might be the poster-bufo of how introducing species can get out of hand, but damn if they aren't the best bloody cane toads in the world! Australian toads have evolved to hop straighter and farther than ever before. That means they're spreading faster than ever through Australia, sparking worries that they'll harm native species in places where they've never lived before. Twenty-six years after the debut of Cane Toads: An Unnatural History, it seems scientists are still struggling to control the large, poisonous toad.

Alissa Zhu
at 10:09 AM Oct 13 2014
Nature // 

What’s slow, fuzzy, and deadly like a cobra? The slow loris, of course! Researchers are arguing that these endangered Asian primates evolved to mimic venomous snakes.

Kelsey D. Atherton
at 13:14 PM Oct 8 2014
Nature // 

Giant clams loom large on coral reefs, their gaping maws filled with bright lights. On other mollusks, this iridescence is a camouflage, guiding the eye away from the creature’s body. Recent research published in the Royal Society of Science’s journal Interface reveals that these patches of iridescence filter and distribute light for algae that grows inside the clams.

Sarah Fecht
at 09:35 AM Oct 4 2014
Nature // 

The America bison (whose scientific name, we’re delighted to report, is Bison bison bison) used to roam across the prairies by the millions, but hunting culled them to near extinction. Bison have since bounced back, often by interbreeding with cattle. Yellowstone’s population of 5,000 bison is the largest and most genetically pure, but it has a problem: Although the 145 bison to be given away have a clean bill of health, many of the park's bison are carrying a disease that devastates livestock herds

Loren Grush
at 08:09 AM Oct 2 2014
Nature // 

Even after a breakup, past boyfriends can still have a hold over your future relationships (usually by providing a negative point of comparison). But for some types of flies, ex-lovers can pop up in a much more permanent way – by passing on traits to another male’s offspring.

 
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