Mary Beth Griggs
at 12:13 PM May 4 2017
Nature // 

The skunk does this acrobatic handstand to intimidate threats. It sprays just like other skunks, coming down from its handstand and twisting its body into a U so both it's face and rear are pointed at its antagonist.

Sara Chodosh
at 11:07 AM May 3 2017
Nature // 

You're a lady dragonfly. You've just had sex with some dude (is there such a thing as a female dragonfly orgasm?) who finished and flew away immediately, leaving you to find a safe place to lay your eggs. And now this other guy just will not leave you alone.

Eleanor Cummins
at 11:07 AM May 3 2017
Nature // 

For the ancient Egyptians, eating an onion was like biting into a piece of eternity, so enamored were they of the vegetable's spherical shape and concentric circles, supposedly representative of unending time. For me, biting into an onion has an effect that makes me wish for the calm nothingness of eternity...

Mary Beth Griggs
at 09:49 AM May 1 2017
Nature // 

There are so many excuses. You won a goldfish at a raffle, but you have a herd of curious cats at home. You got the goldfish in the breakup, but you travel too much to meet its needs. Your kids won't take care of the goldfish, and anything is better than watching that poor creature suffer.

Rachel Feltman
at 09:49 AM May 1 2017
Nature // 

You may have seen headlines proclaiming that the great mystery of Antarctica's "Blood Falls" has finally been solved. That's a little silly, because the big mystery—the question of why blood-like bright red liquid oozes out of the otherwise white surface of Taylor Glacier—hasn't been all that mysterious for some time. Two years ago, a study suggested that the water, a salty brine full of interesting microbial life and colored by a high level of iron, seems to come up from an underground waterway that connects visible lakes on the surface.

Mary Beth Griggs
at 09:49 AM May 1 2017
Nature // 

On January 15, 2016, a dead humpback whale was spotted floating off the coast of Virginia Beach. Then Virginia played host to two more stranded humpbacks. So began a terrible trend.

Sara Chodosh
at 10:50 AM Apr 28 2017
Nature // 

It's not clear why dogs look at us when they poop, but it's possible they're trying to make sure you're on the lookout while they're in a vulnerable position. So stop watching them poop and keep guard!

 
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