Kendra Pierre-Louis
at 09:56 AM Jun 20 2017
Nature // 

It killed 739 people in Chicago 1995. In Europe in 2003, it claimed another 70,000 lives. Just seven years later, it would take down 55,000 more in Russia. Extreme heat can and does kill. And while those heatwaves garnered global attention, according to a study released today in the journal Nature, they're more common than we think. The study's authors note that worldwide, some 30 percent of people are exposed to life-threatening extreme heat for at least 20 days of each year. If we do nothing to reduce climate changing emissions that are helping to push the mercury higher, they write, 74 percent of people will experience routine extreme heat events by 2100. And as is already the case today, at least some of those people will die.

Sarah Fecht
at 09:56 AM Jun 20 2017
Nature // 

Fortune doesn't always favor the bold. Whereas male elk tend to live fast and die by age 5, some female elk have been known to live to the ripe old age of 20.

Sarah Fecht
at 09:30 AM Jun 17 2017
Nature // 

El Niño has given us a preview of West Antarctica's future, and things do not look good. For two weeks in January of 2016, unusually warm weather caused a 300,000 square mile patch of the Ross Ice Shelf to partially melt. The roughly Texas-sized area, blanketed in a slushy mixture of ice and water, represents one of the first times scientists have been able to catch such widespread Antarctic melting in action. The findings were published this week in Nature Communications.

Aparna Nathan
at 09:30 AM Jun 17 2017
Nature // 

Imagine: vast expanses of frozen sea, stretching from the northern coast of Alaska into the Arctic horizon. Welcome to the Southern Beaufort Sea—or at least, the Southern Beaufort Sea as it used to be. This icy Arctic ecosystem is dominated by the majestic polar bear, but warmer temperatures are changing both the landscape and its inhabitants.

Aparna Nathan
at 09:08 AM Jun 7 2017
Nature // 

You might not expect it, but the prairie vole has something to teach you about relationships. A recent study of these rodents, published last week in Nature, helps unveil what happens when love (or at least something like it) is on the brain.

Marlene Cimons
at 15:00 PM May 31 2017
Nature // 

There's an old childhood ditty about eating beans that starts off “beans, beans, they're good for your heart,” and ends with a snicker-inducing line about their other well-known effects. It turns out, though, that beans are good for more than your heart. Eating them could also be good for the climate.

Sara Chodosh
at 15:00 PM May 31 2017
Nature // 

Good luck studying glassfrogs. Even the largest ones are barely two inches long, they live only along secluded streams inside dense jungles, and their translucent green skin blends perfectly with the leaves they like to hide under. And just to make life even harder for biologists, some of them have completely transparent skin.

 
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