Cassidy Mayeda
at 09:36 AM Aug 22 2017

The shivers, the shakes, the chills—we've all experienced a fever at one time or another. When we take our temperatures and the thermometer reads anything above 99 degrees, many of us immediately believe we are afflicted with some kind of infectious microbe. But, in fact, having a fever doesn't always signal infection. Yes, contagions like strep throat or the flu, are the most common reason for an elevated temperature, but it's surely not the only one. More uncommon ailments like brain injury, reactions to legal and illegal drugs, and even cancer can raise your body temperature above its natural level. But don't freak out, yet. Knowing what the causes are and how they can occur can help you make the most informed decision about your elevated body temperature.

Sara Chodosh
at 12:34 PM Aug 18 2017

Look, do what you want with your pubic hair. Shave it off, give it a coconut oil hair mask, braid it, bedazzle it, whatever. Do what makes you feel good. But for heaven's sake, be safe when you're doing it.

Sara Chodosh
at 12:34 PM Aug 18 2017

There's a decent chance you'll get some kind of cancer at some point. If you're a man, your odds are one in two. If you're a woman, one in three. Your risk of dying from cancer is only slightly lower: one in four and one in five, respectively.

Sara Chodosh
at 10:11 AM Aug 15 2017

“Bubonic” is almost onomatopoeic. It sounds bulbous and grotesque and ancient. It sounds like something your great great grandmother might have contracted as a child, along with “the consumption.” So when headlines proclaim that the bubonic plague is alive in Arizona (or New Mexico, or wherever) it feels like some archaic monster has risen from the grave. The reality is that it never actually died.

Aparna Nathan
at 10:11 AM Aug 15 2017

Once difficult and expensive even for the most technologically advanced labs, genetic testing is fast becoming a cheap and easy consumer product. With a little spit and 200 dollars, you can find out your risk for everything from cystic fibrosis to lactose intolerance.

Kate Baggaley
at 08:00 AM Aug 8 2017

If you look at your skin, most of what you will see is actually dead cells. This thin outermost sheet protects the living cells underneath as they develop.

Kate Baggaley
at 10:02 AM Aug 1 2017

It takes a hookworm four to six weeks to travel through the human body and reach the gut, where it latches onto the small intestine and sucks blood to sustain itself.

 
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