Marlene Cimons
at 10:00 AM Jun 6 2017
Energy // 

You know it as a white smudge across the lifeguard's nose, or a soothing cream on your baby's bottom. But someday, the white ointment that protects our skin could generate electricity on your roof or in your car.

Kendra Pierre-Louis
at 15:39 PM May 24 2017
Energy // 

In early March, D.C.'s famed cherry blossoms were ready to pop. An unusually balmy February had nudged the trees from the naked skeletal branches of dull dormancy into full flower production mode. Although most of the flowers were still young—little more than buds—some had reached a status worthy of peeping, with full “puffy white” blossoms. And then came a week of not wholly unexpected back-to-back hard freezes. It was early March, after all, and the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration doesn't declare Washington free from frost risk until the end of April.

Mark D. Kaufman
at 11:07 AM May 11 2017
Energy // 

In preparation for war in 1940s, U.S. Army tanks crunched across the wild deserts of Southern California, leaving tracks that will remain for thousands of years. Jeffrey Lovich, a U.S. Geologic Survey research ecologist, has trekked through these harsh desert environs for decades, and sometimes comes across the tank- imprinted past. “It's a consequence of history,” he says.

Mary Beth Griggs
at 10:43 AM May 10 2017
Energy // 

Yes, there was a tunnel collapse at a former nuclear processing facility on Tuesday. No, you don't need to panic. Knowledge is power:

Marlene Cimons
at 08:48 AM May 5 2017
Energy // 

Algae can be used for anything. You can grind it into cattle feed or squeeze it into jet fuel. You can even make it into algae butter. For now, algae-based products remain woefully expensive, but a group of California scientists is working on making them a whole lot cheaper.

Kelsey D. Atherton
at 11:07 AM May 3 2017
Energy // 

On April 1, 2017, the White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico opened its Stallion gate to the public, like it does twice every year. For a few hours, visitors are free to wander the Trinity Test Site, where, on July 16, 1945, the United States tested the first atomic bomb in history, forever altering the destructive power available to humans. On the way in, the over 4,600 visitors were greeted by about two dozen protesters, whose signs bore a simple, stark message: The first victims of an atomic bomb are still living.

Rob Verger
at 09:49 AM May 1 2017
Energy // 

Our smartphones and other gadgets are powered by lithium-ion batteries, but as companies like Samsung know all too well, those charge-holders can be flammable under the wrong conditions. The hazards of lithium-ion batteries are also a concern for another group, one with a strong incentive to keep fires at bay: the U.S. Navy. Now chemists at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory (NLR) have announced a new battery technology that they say is both safe and rechargeable, and could make its way into electric vehicles, bikes, or ships.

 
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