Brooke Borel
at 12:45 PM Apr 24 2015
Energy // 

In recent years, foodies and earth-conscious eaters alike have grown increasingly interested in entomophagy (for the uninitiated, that's the practice of eating insects). There are several reasons why, but a big one is that we're facing a looming global food crisis. According to entomophagy proponents, insects could be one answer to this crisis because the critters require fewer resources—specifically, feed, land, and water—than other popular sources of protein such as poultry, pigs, and cattle. Part of the reasoning behind this hinges on the idea that insects are better at converting feed to protein compared to larger livestock.

Mary Beth Griggs
at 12:44 PM Apr 24 2015
Energy // 

From plants to people, every living thing on this planet needs water. But getting enough to survive, and survive comfortably, that can be a little tricky. Just look at the furor around California's new water restrictions. If a state as wealthy as California is having to get creative in order to start saving water, you can bet that governments and municipalities with less money and clout are having to turn to even more inventive methods to get clean water without breaking the bank.

Mary Beth Griggs
at 12:38 PM Apr 24 2015
Energy // 

On March 30, Elon Musk sent out this tweet:

Mary Beth Griggs
at 09:08 AM Apr 10 2015
Energy // 

Instead of tilting at windmills, how about living in one? The Dutch Windwheel is a giant proposed wind turbine for the city of Rotterdam in the Netherlands, which will feature apartments and hotel rooms along the outside of the structure.

Mary Beth Griggs
at 09:59 AM Apr 8 2015
Energy // 

Generally when you think of solar power, the sun beating down on a dry, dusty desert might come to mind. But in Brazil, a new project will see solar panels installed on a much wetter surface: the surface of a reservoir.

Dan Moren
at 09:59 AM Apr 8 2015
Energy // 

Almost all of the electronic devices that we carry around with us all day now rely on one key, but increasingly antiquated, technology: the lithium-ion battery. A mainstay of rechargeable power for the last couple decades, this battery technology has gotten only minor refinements. But a substantial improvement in stored power may be in the offing, thanks to researchers at Stanford University, who have developed a new battery technology based on aluminum.

Mary Beth Griggs
at 10:49 AM Apr 7 2015
Energy // 

Maryland has a big, stinking problem. Every year, the poultry industry produces about 650 million pounds of manure within that state alone. Chicken manure is a great fertilizer, but in Maryland, there is so much of it that what once was seen as a resource has become the target of investigations by groups worried about the effect of this phosphorus-rich substance polluting the nearby Chesapeake Bay and destroying local seafood industries.

 
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