Douglas Main
at 11:12 AM Apr 23 2014
Energy // 

Right. The United Kingdom's Environment Agency has determined in a report released to The Guardian that the "dump is virtually certain to be eroded by rising sea levels and to contaminate the Cumbrian coast with large amounts of radioactive waste." The report also noted, in a somewhat underwhelming fashion, that "it is doubtful whether the location of the [dump] site would be chosen for a new facility for near-surface radioactive waste disposal if the choice were being made now." Tanks for nuttin', EA! JK.

John Perlin
at 09:51 AM Apr 23 2014
Energy // 

The great Scottish scientist James Clerk Maxwell wrote in 1874 to a colleague: “I saw conductivity of Selenium as affected by light. It is most sudden. Effect of a copper heater insensible. That of the sun great.”

Colin Lecher
at 00:00 AM Jun 8 2013
Energy // 

In October, at the Deschutes National Forest in central Oregon, a team of scientists and engineers began pumping 11 million gallons of water underground, right near the caldera of the famed Newberry Volcano...

Anthony Fordham
at 09:57 AM May 31 2013
Energy // 

After nearly 50 years of service, Australia's first reactor, called HIFAR (the High Flux Australian Reactor) was turned off in 2006. Now, we have a newer and more technically sophisticated reactor called OPAL - the Open Pool Australian Lightwater reactor.Google it and you'll find a series of newspaper articles carrying on about water leaks and organisational politics, and not so much about what the reactor actually does.

Colin Lecher
at 05:06 AM Mar 28 2013
Energy // 

To find a way of fending off global warming, scientists sometimes look to nature. Plants, after all, use photosynthesis to snap up carbon dioxide, the biggest source of our climate change woes. So we get inventions like artificial leaves and ambitious projects like a plan to give fish photosynthesizing powers. One of the more interesting plans: genetically alter microorganisms so they can chow down on some CO2, too.

Shaunacy Ferro
at 08:45 AM Mar 13 2013
Energy // 

Japanese officials report they've produced natural gas from underwater methane hydrate, a frozen mix of water and methane known as "burning ice." Previous experiments have successfully extracted gas from on-shore deposits, but this is the first time we've been able to do it with deep sea reserves.

Shaunacy Ferro
at 03:30 AM Feb 14 2013
Energy // 

President Obama promised to make "meaningful progress" on the issue of climate change in the State of the Union Address last night.

 
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