Lindsay Handmer
at 10:01 AM Jul 30 2014
Science // 

Taking apart a microwave and building your own ray gun is a bad idea. A really really bad idea - especially when you use it to explode a radio. But thanks to YouTube, we can watch someone else do it with no danger to ourselves. So what is really going on in the video and why aren't they getting fried?

Douglas Main
at 08:40 AM Jul 30 2014

When you get a vaccine, it's typically injected into the muscle below the skin with a needle. But vaccines administered through the skin can use smaller pin-prick methods that could be useful for those afraid of needles, such as children. These cutaneous vaccines have the potential to be relatively painless, and could also possibly require less vaccine material. Unfortunately, the chemical adjuvants used in intramuscular vaccines can cause scarring and ulceration, and therefore new adjuvants for cutaneous (skin-administered) vaccines are "urgently needed," as various researchers have written. Adjuvants are chemicals like aluminum salts and oils which work by mimicking components of pathogens (like bacterial cell walls) that the immune system has evolved to recognized and react to. 

Francie Diep
at 08:40 AM Jul 30 2014
Nature // 

Crop-munching caterpillars in Brazil are no longer put off by genetically modified plants designed to kill them, Reuters reports. The report is just the latest in a series that have emerged over the past few years.

Douglas Main
at 08:40 AM Jul 30 2014
Science // 

Who doesn't love a good mystery, especially one that stumps researchers? 

Lindsay Handmer
at 13:11 PM Jul 29 2014
Science // 

Last night Sydney enjoyed an amazing winter sunset that slowly faded between endless colours. While beautiful sunsets are common, this one was particularly long lasting and photogenic. Not surprisingly, Facebook and the internet was soon awash with pictures. But what made the Sydney sunset so spectacular?

Alexandra Ossola
at 07:17 AM Jul 29 2014

As a traditionally Catholic country, Peru has been slower than most to accept contraceptives. Over the past decade, most citizens’ ideology has gradually stretched to accommodate the need for birth control, but emergency contraception (AKA the “morning after” pill) is still highly controversial in Peru. Although some question the pill on moral grounds, others are starting to question it based on sinister scientific findings: some of the pills are not the pill.

Emily Gertz
at 12:05 PM Jul 26 2014
Nature // 

If you're not worried about a future without toro sushi or rare tuna steaks, you probably should be. Five of the eight species of this tasty marine predator are endangered, according to the International Union for the Conservation of Nature, source of the Red List of threatened species. In January 2013 an international group of fisheries researchers told the world (PDF) that Pacific bluefin tuna had been fished to their lowest levels in history, with the population near to collapsing as a commercial stock.

 
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