Sara Chodosh
at 10:38 AM Mar 29 2017

Spinach could be good for your heart in more ways than one. It's packed with fiber, vitamin A, and the branching vasculature necessary for cells to absorb nutrients.

Kendra Pierre-Louis
at 10:38 AM Mar 29 2017
Nature // 

Cherries grow on trees, strawberries on vines, but how do cashews grow? Thanks to our current food system, we can get crops from almost anywhere in the world—vanilla from Madagascar, bananas from Ecuador. Of course, the downside of receiving produce from far-off lands is that we can't exactly run into the fields to see how they're grown. For many, the manner in which fruits and veggies emerge from the earth can be something of a mystery. Here are some of the more unexpected ways plants propagate before they make their way into our meals:

Kendra Pierre-Louis
at 09:58 AM Mar 23 2017
Nature // 

At 582,578 square miles, Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument is not just the United States' largest marine protected area—it's currently the largest marine protected area in the world. The monument, a stepladder-shaped oceanic expanse dotted with atolls, shoals, and islands northeast of Hawaii's island of Kauai, was created by President Bush in 2006 and expanded by President Obama in 2016. The goal of Papahānaumokuākea, and of marine protected areas more broadly, is to spare it from the spoilage that frequently happens in unprotected areas: overfishing, pollution, and degradation.

Eleanor Cummins
at 09:58 AM Mar 23 2017
Nature // 

Sure, we'd all love to traipse over to Europa and go hunting for alien lifeforms. But in the meantime, we can enjoy the weirdos that already live right here on Earth. Here are 10 of our favorite Earth-dwelling aliens—organisms so strange they seem otherworldly.

Mary Beth Griggs
at 09:58 AM Mar 23 2017
Science // 

The Earth is about 4.5 billion years old, give or take a few million years. But most of what we see today on our planet's surface is much younger—only a few billion years old, if that.

Kendra Pierre-Louis
at 12:07 PM Mar 22 2017
Science // 

In August of 2005, as the dog days of summer lollygagged towards fall, waters agitated by the winds and currents of Hurricane Katrina rose up and over the Mississippi Gulf Coast. A flurry of criticisms followed—complaints of mediocre warnings, a lackluster disaster response on the part of the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), poorly made levees, and grief at the sheer loss of human life. Amidst the enormity of the disaster, it was easy to overlook the efforts of a small department, the National Homeland Security Research Center (NHSRC), in helping to put the region back together again. Its name, a tangle of government speak, seems designed to make the NHSRC forgettable.

Marlene Cimons
at 12:07 PM Mar 22 2017

Global warming, already linked to countless human health problems, may be increasing the prevalence of Type 2 diabetes, according to a new study published in the journal BMJ Open Diabetes Research & Care.

 
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