Kate Baggaley
at 09:21 AM May 26 2016
Science // 

A new algorithm can analyze ocean data in real time to sense when a tsunami has formed and is on the way. This could give coastal cities better, more accurate warning that a tsunami is on the way, potentially saving thousands of lives.

Ryan F. Mandelbaum
at 09:21 AM May 26 2016
Science // 

It's long been accepted by physics that nature has supplied us with four fundamental forces. Gravity holds the planets and galaxies together, and the electromagnetic force holds us and our molecules together. At the smallest level are the two other forces: the strong nuclear force is the glue for atomic nuclei, and the weak nuclear force helps some atoms go through radioactive decay. These forces seemed to explain the physics we can observe, more or less.

Kate Baggaley
at 09:21 AM May 26 2016
Nature // 

The “pristine” atmosphere our planet had before the industrial revolution may have been cloudier than expected, reports the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN).

Mary Beth Griggs
at 09:21 AM May 26 2016
Nature // 

It sounds almost like something out of a cartoon. Someone crosses the road on a hot day and gets stuck in the melting asphalt, leaving behind shoes like some kind of Family Circus trail .

Kate Baggaley
at 09:21 AM May 26 2016
Nature // 

When mating time rolls around, most male animals offer a glut of tiny sperm. Fruit flies operate a little differently. They deliver a few gigantic sperm. In fact, male Drosophila bifurca flies can produce sperm that are 5.8 centimeters long—20 times longer than their own bodies.

Ryan F. Mandelbaum
at 09:21 AM May 26 2016
Science // 

The musical instrument of the future might be data from high energy particle physics experiments. Researchers from the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider in Geneva, Switzerland and other universities debuted the Quantizer with live streaming at the Association for Computing Machinery's Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems this month. While there have been other attempts to show physics data with sound, like the "chirp" that accompanied February's gravitational wave announcement, this is the first time that high-energy physics collision data can be live streamed as music.

Mary Beth Griggs
at 11:19 AM May 25 2016
Energy // 

The sun gives us so much, providing both lighting and heating for our planet. We try to take advantage of this constant stream of power by using solar panels to convert light into electrical energy. It's a bright idea. But, could we be harnessing more of the sun?

 
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