Mary Beth Griggs
at 08:44 AM Oct 30 2014
Science // 

Forensic scientists often have to reconstruct the events leading up to and following a person's death, in case of foul play. The state of the body can reveal when the person died, how, and where the body was disposed of.

Mary Beth Griggs
at 08:44 AM Oct 30 2014
Nature // 

Compared to most natural disasters, a lava invasion does not move all that fast. Nowhere is that more evident than the small Hawaiian community of Pahoa, where a lava flow has been approaching the town since June 27. Now, the lava has finally arrived on the outskirts of town, overrunning private property. In the picture above, the lava behind the fence is chest-high. Geologists are keeping a close eye on the progress of the flow, which currently seems to be headed straight for Pahoa Village Road, one of the village's main streets, and beyond that, for Highway 130, a traffic artery travelled by 10,000 cars a day. It's already crossed over one road, Cemetery Road, and a cemetery (presumably the road's namesake). 

Francie Diep
at 08:44 AM Oct 30 2014

After U.S. government researchers discovered six forgotten vials of smallpox in a freezer this past June, the plan was to destroy the vials. That's still the plan… but the demolition date has been pushed back, Nature News reports.

Francie Diep
at 10:18 AM Oct 29 2014
Energy // 

Hanging out in the kitchen? Chances are, you—and your smartphone—are within five metres of the refrigerator. Right now, two companies are planning for a future in which that means you could get the charge on your phone topped off.

Francie Diep
at 10:18 AM Oct 29 2014
Nature // 

The Commonwealth has been working on a plan for taking care of the Great Barrier Reef over the next four decades—but scientists say it's inadequate. The Australian Academy of Science released today an 11-page critique of the government's latest draft of its Reef 2050 Long-Term Sustainability Plan.

Alissa Zhu
at 10:18 AM Oct 29 2014

In the 90s kids show The Magic School Bus, eccentric teacher Ms. Frizzle took her class for a wild ride in a sick student’s immune system -- only to be attacked by white blood cells. White blood cells tracked the bus using the same chemical traces they follow to find infected sites or navigate their way to viruses. If microscopic robots could replicate this complex navigation system, which is shared by many different cells and bacteria, doctors could use them to provide real-time updates on internal structures or distribute drugs to specific targets within a body.

Francie Diep
at 10:05 AM Oct 28 2014
Science // 

Fresh evidence suggests there exists a type of chemical bond that nobody has ever seen before, Chemistry World reports

 
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