Kendra Pierre-Louis
at 11:14 AM Feb 16 2017

Fever, chills, vomiting, headache, mental confusion, and occasionally death: That's the prognosis for more than 200 million people infected with malaria each year. Preventative measures aimed at reducing risk exposure—that is, avoiding mosquito bites—have had some success. But the ultimate solution, a vaccine, has remained elusive for decades. In fact, the 2009 book The Elusive Malaria Vaccine: Miracle or Mirage? tracks the long history of scientific effort in that arena. Now, however, a study published Wednesday in the journal Nature suggests scientists may have cracked the code.

Mary Beth Griggs
at 11:14 AM Feb 16 2017
Nature // 

In January of last year, drones captured video of houses perched perilously on rapidly-eroding cliffs along California's coast. Those houses in Pacifica, California weren't alone, as waves driven by El Niño tore away huge chunks of the shoreline over the winter of 2015-2016.

Claire Maldarelli
at 11:14 AM Feb 16 2017

Ever since CRISPR—the relatively cheap and easy-to-use genome editing technique—made its way to the scientific stage, researchers have grappled with one of its biggest ethical quagmires: Its ability to edit human embryos, thereby potentially altering the DNA of subsequent generations. The question of whether to allow such a drastic and permanent change has been discussed ad nauseum since it became clear that CRISPR would make this (relatively) easy to do. This week, a panel of experts from the National Academy of Science released a report endorsing this type of research—though a long list of caveats and precautions come in tow.

Kendra Pierre-Louis
at 11:14 AM Feb 16 2017

In China, the famed man in the moon is a bunny. Confused? So, it seems, are our eyes, according to a new study in the journal PLOS ONE. The study looks at why people see so many different images when we stare at Rorschach inkblots.

Sarah Fecht
at 14:43 PM Feb 13 2017
Nature // 

While NSW burns, a snowstorm hammered the Northeast US yesterday, dumping as much as a foot of snow in some places. And while the storm closed schools, grounded flights, and inconvenienced a lot of humans, the animals at the Bronx Zoo couldn't be happier about it. These photos of animals playing in the snow were taken today by zoo staff, and they're the perfect ending to a long week.

Eleanor Cummins
at 14:43 PM Feb 13 2017
Science // 

This has been the week that was and these were/are/could be the images that define it, scientifically. What is time? Who knows. All I know is there isn't enough of it.

Claire Maldarelli
at 14:43 PM Feb 13 2017

This week, The Times of India reported on a 42-year-old Indian woman who went to the emergency room complaining of a severely painful “tingling, crawling sensation” in her head. Two sets of doctors couldn't figure out the cause of her pain, but the third set finally made a breakthrough: They determined it was a “foreign body that seemed to be mobile,” ordered a scan, and found a living, fully-grown cockroach lodged inside her nasal cavity. Doctors quickly guided a flexible tube called an endoscope up the woman's nose to remove the bug. Luckily, everything turned out okay for both the woman and sneaky pest, which doctors noted was crawling around a petri dish after it had been removed.

 
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