Alexandra Ossola
at 08:30 AM Feb 11 2016

In recent years, scientists have been developing new and creative ways to put electronics in the brain. These devices are useful for paralyzed patients to control prosthetic limbs with their minds, to help locked-in patients communicate with the outside world, or to help researchers better predict seizures in epileptic patients. But implanting them requires opening the skull, an intrusive procedure. Now researchers from the University of Melbourne have created a device that can be inserted into the brain through the blood vessels, no invasive surgery required. The study was published this week in Nature Biotechnology.

Mary Beth Griggs
at 08:29 AM Feb 11 2016
Energy // 

The Supreme Court voted 5-4 to issue a temporary stay on President Obama's Clean Power Plan. The move blocks the plan's implementation until a lower court can hear objections to the plan in June.

Annabel Edwards
at 08:29 AM Feb 11 2016
Nature // 

Chaser—the border collie who knows more than 1,200 words—has been called the world's smartest dog. Could she lose her title as she enters her teen years? Researchers in Vienna studied aging dogs' cognition, and the results are promising.

Alexandra Ossola
at 08:29 AM Feb 11 2016

Surgeons at Johns Hopkins will perform the first-ever organ transplant between a HIV-positive donor and recipient.

Mary Beth Griggs
at 09:45 AM Feb 10 2016
Nature // 

Someone's got good taste. A hungry sea lion pup wandered into a beachfront restaurant in San Diego last week, charming the chef and taking a seat (and a nap) in one of the booths.

Jason Tetro
at 09:45 AM Feb 10 2016

Two and a half months after the announcement of the Zika virus outbreak in Brazil, concern over the effects of infection seem to be spreading faster than the virus. This incredibly rapid rise of worry is justified as the virus continues to demonstrate potential links to a variety of serious conditions. In the last few weeks, in addition to the original reports of microcephaly, the virus appears to be implicated in the potentially fatal Guillain-Barré Syndrome. Now there is evidence of the virus in saliva and urine, suggesting human to human transmission may also occur.

Mary Beth Griggs
at 09:36 AM Feb 10 2016
Nature // 

You don't need eyes to see--at least, not if you're a cyanobacteria.

 
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