Mary Beth Griggs
at 10:50 AM Feb 24 2017
Nature // 

Here's the buzz: bees are brilliant. And not just because they are a vital part of our ecosystem. Bees are also very clever—and apparently capable of learning one of the fundamentals of football.

Kendra Pierre-Louis
at 10:50 AM Feb 24 2017
Nature // 

A crack along an Antarctic glacier has grown roughly 50 kilometres in a matter of months, leaving NASA researchers to believe that the resulting iceberg—known as Larsen C—may make it to the open ocean in as little as a weeks or months. The 9 km added to the rift since early January has brought it to a staggering 160 km (give or take) in length.

Sara Chodosh
at 10:50 AM Feb 24 2017
Nature // 

The fightin' sea cows are making a comeback. Manatees have been on the endangered species list since 1972, but in the last few years they've been more abundant than ever. So abundant that they may have their status downgraded to 'threatened.'

Mary Beth Griggs
at 10:35 AM Feb 23 2017
Nature // 

It all started with an e-mail. Three years ago, University College London professor Chronis Tzedakis had just explained the basic cycles of an ice age to an undergraduate geology class; how the Earth goes through periods of glaciation followed by warmer periods when glaciers melt. Sometimes, the timing between those periods varies dramatically.

Rachel Feltman
at 10:35 AM Feb 23 2017

When I saw the press release for a new study linking the risk of autism to maternal infection with genital herpes, my heart sunk. Because you can't put two scary buzzwords like "autism" and "herpes" into a press release without creating this kind of media response:

Sara Chodosh
at 10:35 AM Feb 23 2017

Cat owners can sleep easy tonight. Well, maybe they can't if their cat likes to wake them up at 4am by gently clawing their cheeks, but they can at least put their minds at ease: owning a cat isn't actually bad for your mental health.

Mary Beth Griggs
at 10:35 AM Feb 23 2017
Science // 

Today, the seeds of 49,000 varieties of crops—including cabbages, wheat, lentils, sweet peas, and many others—will be wheeled into a vault in a mountainside. There they will lay in in sturdy black plastic boxes in a frigid underground vault high above the Arctic Circle, an insurance policy for the entire world's food supply.

 
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