Alexandra Ossola
at 11:06 AM Sep 2 2015
Science // 

In 2005, a forensic pathologist named Bennet Omalu published a paper about a disease he had just discovered called Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE). You might have heard of it—CTE causes the brain to break down as a result of repeated head trauma and has been found to affect dozens of former football players. But when Omalu published his paper, he faced staunch opposition from the National Football League (NFL), which wanted to suppress the discovery even though the organization was putting 1,700 players at risk every year, a story chronicled in the 2009 GQ article "Brain Game."

Mary Beth Griggs
at 11:06 AM Sep 2 2015
Nature // 

Termites get a bad reputation in the housing business. They are often looked at as signs of the domestic apocalypse, causing billions of dollars in damage to houses every year. But when it comes to building their own homes, termites are master engineers. Such is their architectural prowess as some of their mounds even have solar-powered ventilation systems.

Lindsey Kratochwill
at 11:06 AM Sep 2 2015
Nature // 

Think about how jellyfish or squid move. You're imagining a graceful display of jet propulsion, right? It's not uncommon for underwater species to take advantage of their environment to propel themselves through it. In a study released in Nature Communications today, researchers from the Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole, Oregon University, and Stanford University detail how colonies of tiny hydrozoans use jet propulsion in concert with each other.

Lindsey Kratochwill
at 11:05 AM Sep 2 2015
Nature // 

Last week, scientists on Twitter started the #JunkOff hashtag, filling Twitter with well, animal genitalia. But this week, there's a more adorable hashtag to follow along. It's appropriately named #CuteOff, and here are a couple of our favorite contenders. It's certainly a tough field.

Mary Beth Griggs
at 11:05 AM Sep 2 2015
Nature // 

If you think scorpions are scary today, be very glad that you weren't around 467 million years ago. Today, these stealthy stingers are found on land, but back then, scorpion ancestors ruled the seas.

Mary Beth Griggs
at 11:05 AM Sep 2 2015
Science // 

Rainfall can be wonderful, but only in moderation. Heavy, prolonged downpours can end in disaster, causing severe flooding, and even landslides. Unlike other natural disasters like hurricanes, volcanos and earthquakes, landslides weren't historically tracked or noted. But NASA is slowly changing that.

Mary Beth Griggs
at 10:06 AM Aug 31 2015
Nature // 

Eleven of the fifteen largest cities in the world are located on the coast. The tenuous barrier between land and sea was a boon for humanity in the past, providing access to ports around the globe, building lifelines of trade between countries, and raising triumphs of steel and concrete high into the air. Now, sea levels are also on the rise, putting millions of people who live in those cities in harm's way.

 
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