James Bullen
at 00:00 AM Sep 19 2011
Cornell Creative Machines Lab

Your friends may be forgiven in thinking you a little strange when you boldly claim you’ll be printing your dinner tonight. But Cornell Creative Machines Lab have already succeeded in printing foods, and are interested in bringing their 3D printers into your home.

Danika Wilkinson
at 00:00 AM Sep 19 2011
NASA
Space // 

A five tonne piece of space junk is hurtling out of control towards Earth and is expected to hit the ground sometime this weekend.NASA says that the defunct Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS), which was launched in 1991 to study climate change, will make impact somewhere between 57° south latitude and 57° north latitude - basically the entire populated world.

Nick Gilbert
at 00:00 AM Sep 19 2011
NASA/James Drake

Short of actually getting a ticket on a shuttle headed to space, this just might be the best view you're ever likely to get of our little corner of the universe.

Nick Gilbert
at 00:00 AM Sep 19 2011
Fold.it

It turns out that gaming really can help cure the world's ills, after online problem-solvers helped decypher the structure of an enzyme that may hold clues to fighting HIV.

Dan Nosowitz
at 19:15 PM Sep 17 2011
NASA

According to some tricky calculations from Guillaume Robuchon and Francis Nimmo at the University of California, Santa Cruz, Pluto may actually have a liquid ocean underneath its frigid, -230 °C exterior.

John Mahoney
at 05:57 AM Sep 17 2011
John Mahoney
Cars // 

I'm a 28-year-old gadget nerd. Like many of my generation, I don't often read instruction manuals. In dealings with parents, relatives and older friends, I've often struggled to wrap my head around what it is about technology that so fundamentally baffles members of generations past. Is it a fear of experimentation with the unknown? How can something that feels imprinted on my DNA be so utterly foreign to someone else? It's a feeling shared by any son or daughter visiting home who, after a quick hug from mom and dad, is led unsubtly by the arm over to the computer desk: "Fix this. Please."

Denise Ngo
at 03:35 AM Sep 17 2011

Venture into any apartment, and you're likely to find an object used for something other than its intended purpose. We've seen ground coffee used to repel ants, curtain fabric used as wallpaper, cardboard boxes used as coffee tables, and to the delight of DIY enthusiasts everywhere, a La-Z-Boy converted into a motorised easy chair. While most of us don't possess the expertise needed to turn chairs into moving vehicles, we've all struggled with the question of whether to dispose of an old household item, or to save it in case it came in handy later. Care to guess what PopSci would tell you to do?

Dan Nosowitz
at 01:25 AM Sep 17 2011
Sergei Ilnitsky/AP
Space // 

The Russian Soyuz TMA-21 spacecraft, carrying three astronauts (Commander Andrei Borisenko and Alexander Samokutyayev, both Russian, and American Ron Garan) safely landed this morning in Kazakhstan, bringing them home after five months on the International Space Station. The landing, about 151 km southeast of the smallish Kazakh city Zhezkazgan, wasn't entirely flawless--mission control lost contact with the capsule briefly--but the landing itself was very smooth.

Julie Beck
at 00:15 AM Sep 17 2011
Kate Charlton-Robb et al, PLoS One
Science // 

A new species of dolphin was discovered by Australian zoologists off the coast of Melbourne, after they realized the 150 or so porpoises that were previously thought to be bottlenose dolphins actually differed significantly in skull shape and DNA. That, kids, is why you should always double-check your homework. Or, you know, dolphin skull shape. Same thing.

Dan Nosowitz
at 07:25 AM Sep 16 2011
Science/AAAS
Science // 

A cache of feathers preserved in amber, dating from around 70 to 85 million years ago, was just found in Canada, showing that border between winged dinosaurs and the earliest avians. The study indicates that these feathers, relatively modern, were already appearing even before the non-avian dinosaurs were extinct.

Julie Beck
at 07:00 AM Sep 16 2011
Arman Hajati
Energy // 

The rumbling you feel driving along a bridge may soon serve a purpose beyond just waking you up behind the wheel. Researchers at MIT have developed a tiny energy-harvester that is able to harness low-frequency vibrations like those made by a bridge or pipeline and converting them to electricity for wireless sensors.

Julie Beck
at 05:45 AM Sep 16 2011
Wikimedia Commons
Gadgets // 

There may already be iPads in cockpits, but there will soon be Androids among us, the passengers. Boeing has announced that all of its 787 Dreamliner planes currently in production are being outfitted with Android servers and touchscreens.

Dan Nosowitz
at 05:00 AM Sep 16 2011
Dan Nosowitz
Science // 

In literature and folklore (and the occasional video game), the blue rose signifies the impossible, or mystery, or the unquenchable. It's not much of a leap, really; roses are ubiquitous, but due to a genetic barrier, a blue rose is naturally impossible. Of course, there's no particular reason to do what that meddling bully nature wants us to do, so a Japanese company has genetically modified a rose to create...well, it's not quite blue, but it's certainly closer than any previous effort.

John Mahoney and Katie Peek
at 04:00 AM Sep 16 2011
NASA/JPL-Caltech
Space // 

A mournful French horn blows. An angsty Luke Skywalker stomps out of his aunt and uncle's sand hut and peers up at Tatooine's double sunset, his hair blowing in the breeze. It's a memorable scene from Star Wars-but now, a precedent for such a sky with two suns has been found in our universe.

Dan Nosowitz
at 02:20 AM Sep 16 2011
Canon
Tech // 

Canon's S90 ushered in a new era of point-and-shoots, where a pocketable camera offered control and quality almost equal to a DSLR. The newest model in this line, the S100, continues the trend: the sensor gets a bump from 10-megapixel to 12.1, it has a new processor (claimed to be faster, more accurate in low light, and with better color reproduction), the ISO and video resolution have improved, and it's got built-in GPS geotagging, so you'll know where your photos were taken. Our friends at Popular Photography call it a "robust update," and considering it's updating just about the best point-and-shoot on the market, that's saying something. Read more at PopPhoto.

 
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