Dan Nosowitz
at 06:50 AM Nov 23 2011
Dan Bracaglia
Gadgets // 

Our good friends over at Popular Photography just posted a lengthy expert test of the iPhone 4S's camera. It's been called one of the best phone cameras ever released, and not just by Apple - but how does it stack up against point-and-shoots, superzooms, and the other "best cameraphones"? More importantly, how does it fare in a proper camera test? Check out the story over at PopPhoto.

Rebecca Boyle
at 17:46 PM Nov 22 2011
NASA
Tech // 

Planetary scientists sometimes joke that we know more about Mars than we do about the moon. NASA first landed a spacecraft on the surface of the fourth planet during the US Bicentennial, five years before the first space shuttle ever lifted off. And we've learned plenty in the intervening 35 years:Viking 1 and 2 analysed Mars rocks, Spirit and Opportunity found evidence of ancient water, and Phoenix saw the Martian snow. Yet the biggest question - whether Mars could ever be home to life - still eludes us.

Rebecca Boyle
at 16:41 PM Nov 22 2011
Liquid Robotics
Robots // 

Two pairs of self-propelled oceangoing robots have begun slowly making their way across the Pacific Ocean, setting off Nov. 17 from San Francisco on an epic journey covering 61,000 kilometres. During their 300-day trip, the robots will collect 2.25 million pieces of data, and attempt to break a world record for the longest distance ever traversed by an unmanned vehicle.

Rebecca Boyle
at 14:02 PM Nov 22 2011
INFN
Tech // 

Another new twist in the science of scofflaw neutrinos: A second Italian physics group now says they are not moving faster than light after all. So the foundations of modern physics appear safe for now - but this debate will likely not be settled for some time.

Staff Writers
at 11:47 AM Nov 22 2011
Cryomation
Science // 

A person's carbon footprint keeps growing after death. Burial uses arable land, and cremation releases a body's carbon into the atmosphere. The Cryomator instead chills the body with liquid nitrogen until it breaks apart and then freeze-dries the remains to remove water and kill microbes.

Staff Writers
at 09:44 AM Nov 22 2011
Courtesy Aerovironment
Science // 

Most flying robots use rotors or propellers, limiting the craft's ability to manoeuvre in tight places. The Nano Hummingbird navigates by changing the angle and shape of its paper-thin wings-which beat 20 to 40 times per second - and can hover in place for up to 11 minutes. It is also small enough to fly through windows or other small openings, strong enough to carry a microphone or camera, and stable enough to maintain a highly controlled hover, even in gusts of wind. Once the design, which is still in prototype, matures and goes into production, operators could use the Hummingbird on reconnaissance missions in environments where maneuverability inside buildings or around near-ground obstacles, such as huts or tents, is essential.

Jon Alain Guzik
at 09:13 AM Nov 22 2011
Jon Alain Guzik
Cars // 

One of the highlights of the LA Auto Show was a chance to drive the Rolls Royce 102EX, a one-of-a-kind electric Phantom. Powered by two 145-kilowatt motors, one at each rear wheel, for a total of 82 metre-kilograms of torque, the 102EX has a range of about 201 kms per charge.

Michael Berk
at 07:52 AM Nov 22 2011
Bose
Gadgets // 

Looked at one way, the Bose VideoWave is a 46" LED backlit LCD TV that costs $7,999, a rare bird in a market where such things have become commodity products at a tenth that price. Sure, it's got integrated speakers and does virtual surround decoding, but hey, they make soundbars for that, right? But the VideoWave offers a lot more - and a lot less, which poetically is a lot more. This isn't an all-in-one. It's just the simplest-working, best-sounding out-of-the-box TV you've ever heard.

Corinne Iozzio
at 04:00 AM Nov 22 2011
Ren Ng
Tech // 

The Lytro Light-Field Camera, a US $400 gadget that allows photographers to re-focus pictures after they're taken, is the product of a decade of work from Ren Ng, a computer-science grad student at Stanford University. As a student, Ng saw potential for a consumer camera in a light-field setup, which then necessitated a room-filling array of lenses - already the product of more than 50 years of light-based physics research. About 10 years later, his company has introduced a personal shooter that could be the biggest change in photography since the digital-image sensor.

James Bullen
at 12:58 PM Nov 21 2011
Paolo Lombardi
Science // 

Two months after scientists first announced they had recorded neutrinos travelling faster than the speed of light, they have repeated the experiment and claim the two tests have very comparable results.

James Bullen
at 11:03 AM Nov 21 2011
Dan Little HRL Laboratories
Tech // 

Perched on top of this dandelion is the world’s lightest material, a newly developed metal that is 99.99 per cent air.

Sean Kane
at 08:40 AM Nov 19 2011
U.S. Navy photo by Joe Schmitt
Tech // 

Apparently, Russian hackers are targeting Springfield, Illinois's water in the US. According to Wired's "Threat Level," last week a group of hackers breached the Springfield, Illinois water utility system and remotely destroyed a water pump.

Staff Writers
at 06:30 AM Nov 19 2011
Jeff Harris

A bad burn needs new skin to heal, but that skin has to come from somewhere. ReCell Spray-On-Skin solution grows cells quickly. Surgeons take a healthy sample from a patient and place it in ReCell's liquid suspension. After 20 minutes, the cells will have multiplied enough to spray onto an area that's 80 times the sample size where the cells can attach and heal.US$20/kit

Paul Adams
at 05:19 AM Nov 19 2011
Science // 

Remember in September when neutrinos were observed moving faster than the speed of light, potentially overturning everything we thought we knew about physics? It was met with all sorts of scepticism and dubiety, so the physicists decided to replicate their experiment and take new measurements.

Staff Writers
at 03:20 AM Nov 19 2011
Jeff Harris
Science // 

Several big-wave surfers have been killed while attempting to conquer giant swells. Billabong's V1 wetsuit significantly reduces that risk. After a wipeout, the surfer pulls an attached ripcord, puncturing a carbon dioxide cartridge that inflates a bladder in the back of the suit.

 
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