Kendra Pierre-Louis
at 10:07 AM Jul 18 2017
Deposit Photos
Science // 

If there's one meal guaranteed to meet the needs of picky toddlers, harried parents, and broke college students alike, it's mac-n-cheese. Whether you prefer the classic stuff in the blue box or the organic brand famous for its pasta bunnies, you probably realize that mac-n-cheese isn't healthy, exactly. But given the fast food alternatives, we tell ourselves, it's isn't that bad. And yet, because everything we love is secretly conspiring to kill us, a recent report suggests that each serving of America's favorite processed cheese food also serves up a hefty dose of phthalates, a class of chemicals increasingly thought to interfere with the body's hormones. But does this mean that you should give up eating that orange goo?

Marissa Shieh
at 10:07 AM Jul 18 2017
Fabio Manucci
Nature // 

Move over Tyrannosaurus rex: There's a new prehistoric carnivore in town. Meet the Razanandrongobe sakalavae, an ancient crocodile from Madagascar measuring as much as 20 feet long by 5 feet wide. Razana's name comes from the native Malagasy for “giant lizard ancestor from Sakalava.” This croc had steak knives for teeth, and was the first of its subfamily to live mostly on land.

Stan Horaczek
at 09:31 AM Jul 17 2017
Stan Horaczek
Drones // 

This carrying case is part of the $699 Fly More Combo, which comes with extra propellers (shown), an extra battery, propeller guards, a dedicated battery charger, and the $150 remote.

Kendra Pierre-Louis
at 09:31 AM Jul 17 2017
NASA Earth Observatory image by Jesse Allen, using Landsat data from the U.S. Geological Survey
Nature // 

As big as the state of Delaware. Twice as big as Luxembourg. When Larsen C, a Western Antarctic ice shelf—otherwise known as a floating mass of ice attached to land—finally separated itself from the mother shelf earlier this week, the news didn't just send waves rippling across the Wendell Sea. It also launched a thousand size analogies (it's twice the volume of Lake Erie, in case you were still having a hard time visualizing it).

Rachel Feltman
at 09:31 AM Jul 17 2017
Wikipedia
Nature // 

Not everyone is familiar with the tardigrade (also known as the water bear, also known as the moss piglet, previously known as "animalcules"), and that's a damn shame. They're less than a millimeter long, sure, but they're almost certainly the most indestructible animals on the planet. You can expose them to the unforgiving vacuum of space, starve them for decades, dehydrate them for literally-who-knows-how-long, boil them, mash them, stick them in a stew, whatever, and as soon as you return them to normal conditions they'll perk right back up and go on their merry way. Their abilities are so obscenely awesome that some scientists are convinced they contain an unprecedented ratio of DNA that's "stolen" from other organisms by way of horizontal gene transfer, though these results proved controversial.

Cassidy Mayeda
at 09:31 AM Jul 17 2017
Depositphotos

A new study published this month in Nature marks a key milestone in Alzheimer's research. It demonstrates the first complete model of a tau filament, a protein structure found in the brain cells of Alzheimer's patients and thought to be the cause of the neurodegenerative disease.

Aparna Nathan
at 09:31 AM Jul 17 2017
David Samson

If your sleep is getting worse with age, evolution might be to blame.

Sara Chodosh
at 09:31 AM Jul 17 2017
Pixabay
Science // 

Kids have no fun anymore, amiright? Back in the day we used to play in the streets! We chased cars! We climbed trees and we fell and sometimes we got hurt—but that was okay! If only we could go back to those days. Life was so great when we didn't really understand the risks involved in cherished childhood activities.

Mary Beth Griggs
at 09:31 AM Jul 17 2017
Pixabay
Nature // 

As the sun starts to set on the 'jungle paradise' of Australia's Orpheus Island, a sweet song fills the air. But instead of leading a beloved wife out of the underworld, this melody leads cane toads to their doom.

Rob Verger
at 09:31 AM Jul 17 2017
Tesla.
Energy // 

By the end of the year, South Australia will be home to the world's biggest battery, if Elon Musk and Tesla make good on an ambitious commitment. The battery installation will be hooked up to a 99-turbine wind farm (which is still being built) and serve as an energy reservoir to ensure that the region has enough power, even during times when power demand peaks.

Sarah Fecht
at 09:31 AM Jul 17 2017
Illustration by Moon Express

A lander like this will fly in Moon Express's first launch, slated for later this year. It can carry up to 66 pounds of equipment and scientific instruments to the lunar surface. Or it can stay in orbit or travel deeper into space.

Mary Beth Griggs
at 09:31 AM Jul 17 2017
NASA / JPL / Björn Jónsson / Seán Doran © PUBLIC DOMAIN
Space // 

This week, NASA's Juno spacecraft got an up-close look at that planet's most iconic feature: the Great Red Spot.

Sara Chodosh
at 09:31 AM Jul 17 2017
Pixabay
Nature // 

A flock of ravens ravaging a carcass may technically be called an unkindness, but the real unkindness is using that term. Everyone is always hating on the smarty pants, but ravens are not terrifying. Do they have sharp, curved beaks that they use to tear dead animals to pieces? Yes. Are their calls reminiscent of a creepy laugh? Most definitely. But just because they're masterminds doesn't make them evil—it just makes them awesome.

PopSci Staff
at 10:39 AM Jul 5 2017
Philips
Gadgets // 

Alongside its Hue smart light bulbs, Philips has been quietly selling stand-alone lamps for a few years now. The Wellness and Wellner are two of the company's latest tabletop offerings. Both come with White Ambiance LED bulbs, which can mimic a range of natural daylight color temperatures and are meant to help you wake up, concentrate, relax, and fall asleep.

Mary Beth Griggs
at 10:32 AM Jul 5 2017
Pixabay
Science // 

The first time I tried to make ice cream, I forgot to add the cold. Friends had just given me a free ice cream machine and I was hyped up on the thrill of being able to make ice cream in my own kitchen. I read the recipe over and over, but neglected to read the directions to the brand-new appliance quite as carefully. After 40 minutes spinning in the machine, my cream contained no ice, and was just a well-stirred, soupy mess.

 
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