Mark D. Kaufman
at 11:22 AM Apr 7 2017
NOAA
Science // 

  Both vacationers and residents in Galveston, Texas, knew a storm was approaching on September 7, 1900. But there was no evacuation, and most everyone stayed put, not realizing the scale of the coming fury. The next day, surging waters killed 8,000 people.

Rachel Feltman
at 11:22 AM Apr 7 2017
Nature // 

You're a complex organism. You socialize with family and friends, you solve puzzles and make choices. Humans may be some of the most cerebral animals on the planet, but we know we're not alone in having this sort of behavioral complexity. Crows use tools. Primates create incredible social structures. Whales congregate.

Sarah Fecht
at 11:22 AM Apr 7 2017
NASA

A supermassive black hole lurks at the center of our galaxy, but we've never seen it. We know it's there, and that it has the mass of about 4 million suns, and that the stars in our galaxy revolve around it. But no one could tell you exactly what it looks like.

Kendra Pierre-Louis
at 11:22 AM Apr 7 2017
Pexels
Hacks // 

A new study released earlier this week in the journal Nature Nanotechnology may be a major step towards making desalinated water—water in which salt is removed to make it safe for drinking—a viable option for more of the world. Researchers from the University of Manchester modified graphene oxide membranes, a type of selectively permeable membrane that allows some molecules to pass while keeping others behind, to let water through while trapping salt ions. It's essentially a molecular sieve.

Kendra Pierre-Louis
at 11:22 AM Apr 7 2017
Pexels

Airplane passengers are in for an increasingly bumpy ride according to a study released today in the journal Advances in Atmospheric Sciences. Climate change is altering the jet stream, making severe turbulence more likely. The study builds on earlier work which found that climate change would lead to bumpier airplane rides. What makes the new research unique is that it quantifies how much different kinds of turbulence will increase—59 percent in the case of light turbulence, a 94 percent increase in moderate turbulence, and 149 percent increase in severe turbulence.

Sarah Fecht
at 11:22 AM Apr 7 2017
Benson et al., 2017

Forensic scientists are trying to understand what tears and distortions in the fabric around a stab wound can say about the knife type, angle of attack, and stabbing technique that caused the wound. But the patterns have been difficult to work out, partly because researchers have had to do most of their laboratory experiments by hand, manually stabbing different fabric swatches. But inconsistencies and human error are unavoidable. So a team of forensic scientists and engineers invented a stabbing machine to help standardize this type of research.

Sarah Fecht
at 14:35 PM Mar 31 2017
SpaceX
Space // 

On March 30, the first stage of a Falcon 9 rocket sent its second payload into space, after having launched and landed in April 2016. This achievement is an important milestone in the company's road to creating a reusable launch system—and a feat that's 15 years in the making. The launch and subsequent landing on a drone ship proves, as SpaceX CEO Elon Musk noted, "you can fly and re-fly an orbit-class booster."

Sarah Fecht
at 14:35 PM Mar 31 2017
SES

SpaceX made history by launching a used rocket booster on its second mission, then bringing it back for a safe landing on a drone ship. It's a big deal for the company that's betting on reusable rockets to dramatically reduce the cost of going to space.

Mary Beth Griggs
at 14:35 PM Mar 31 2017
Richard Smith/OceanRealmImages
Nature // 

At first glance, a fang blenny looks completely unthreatening. It's small, brightly colored, and looks like it would be an adorable backup character in a Finding Nemo film. Then, it opens its mouth.

Sarah Fecht
at 14:35 PM Mar 31 2017
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center
Space // 

About four billion years ago, Mars was warm. Water flowed in lakes and rivers under a nice thick blanket of atmosphere. But then something cataclysmic happened. Mars' insulating atmosphere all but disappeared. Exposed to the harsh elements of space, the red planet became the dry, frozen wasteland that it is today.

Eleanor Cummins
at 14:35 PM Mar 31 2017
Flickr user Jerry Kirkhart
Science // 

Slime mold, ants, and Amazon's product recommendation system may be making decisions the exact same way, according to a new study.

Sara Chodosh and Kendra Pierre-Louis
at 14:35 PM Mar 31 2017
Pexels

Air Pollution kills. A study released yesterday in the journal Nature found that in 2007, air pollution lead to the premature deaths of 3.45 million people worldwide—a number equivalent to the population of the state of Connecticut. And to add insult to injury, air pollution doesn't respect borders.

Kendra Pierre-Louis
at 14:35 PM Mar 31 2017
Pexels
Science // 

Climate change isn't just bad for the planet and for our bodies. According to a new report by the American Psychological Association, Climate for Health, and ecoAmerica, climate change is bad for our mental health too.

Mary Beth Griggs
at 14:35 PM Mar 31 2017
Pixabay
Nature // 

Mosquitoes are blood-sucking, disease-carrying embodiments of annoyance in insect form. They're also fascinating aerodynamic enigmas.

Julie Seabrook Ream
at 14:35 PM Mar 31 2017
Nature // 

The following are images from Encyclopedia of Rainbows: Our World Organized by Color by Julie Seabrook Ream, a book that shows the world arranged by color. Here are a selection of rainbows curated from the natural world.

 
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