Eleanor Cummins
at 10:46 AM Jan 9 2018
Wikimedia Commons
Nature // 

Though it sounds like a factoid ripped straight from Ripley's Believe It Or Not, experts confirmed that Jacksonville, Florida really was colder than Anchorage, Alaska on Tuesday. With strange weather fronts and severe storms blowing across the country, the biggest city in the frigid “Last Frontier” state hit 49 degrees. Meanwhile, parts of the so-called “Sunshine State” only eked out a high around 41 degrees. As the Associated Press succinctly put it, the weather is currently “upside down”.

Stan Horaczek
at 10:46 AM Jan 9 2018
Swix
Tech // 

Ryan Knapp is a senior staff meteorologist and weather observer at the Mount Washington Observatory in White Mountains, New Hampshire. When we talked on the phone, the temperature at the observatory—which is at the mountain's summit— was hovering between -20 and -30 degrees. Most of us experience painfully frigid temperatures like that rarely, if ever, but it's not out of the ordinary for Knapp and the Mount Washington crew. Sitting at 6,267 feet above sea level, the facility has an average low of -4 degrees and a record low of -47 degrees. And that's before you add in the punishing winds which gust to 70 miles per hour and beyond. Brutal.

Claire Maldarelli
at 10:46 AM Jan 9 2018
Deposit Photos
Fitness // 

Every January, fat's in the crosshairs of health columnists, fitness magazines, and desperate Americans. This year, PopSci looks at the macronutrient beyond its most negative associations. What's fat good for? How do we get it to go where we want it to? Where does it wander when it's lost? This, my friends, is Fat Month.

Rachel Feltman
at 10:46 AM Jan 9 2018
DepositPhotoshttps://depositphotos.com/149698760/stock-photo-woman-drinking-water.html)
Science // 

Do you ever feel like your drinking water is just too clean? Last week, The New York Times reported on a trendy new beverage known as raw water. Yes: people are spending loads on unfiltered, untreated, and totally unsterilized spring water.

Sara Chodosh
at 10:46 AM Jan 9 2018
Pixabay
Science // 

Extreme diets are just the nutritional version of 30-day fitness challenges. Nearly everyone tries them at some point, but they don't generally turn your life around. We seek out both for the same reason: because it's often not good enough for us to make a change. It also has to feel like we've made a change.

Jeffrey Lin and P.W. Singer
at 10:46 AM Jan 9 2018
CCTV+
Drones // 

At the close of the Global Fortune Forum in Guangzhou on Dec. 7, the event's hosts set a world record for the largest drone swarm ever deployed. For 9 minutes, 1,180 drones danced and blinked out an aerial show. It was cool. It was also an interesting look into the potential future of aviation.

Peter Gwynne
at 10:46 AM Jan 9 2018
Popular Science, December 1980

How will the universe end? Will it sputter out in a realm of ice, cooling continually as it expands until it reaches the absolute zero of temperature throughout its vast expanse? Will it die in a fiery blast as its component parts rush together faster and faster until they all meet in an enormous fireball? Or will the cosmos live on forever, expanding and contracting in relentless succession?

Rob Verger
at 11:22 AM Dec 1 2017
Google Street View / Stanford University

Google Street View images are filled with cars. That is a simple and pedestrian truth, and one which artificial intelligence researchers have taken advantage of to do something surprising. By analyzing car type, they were able to make predictions about the demographic information of the people in the cities they studied.

Nicole Wetsman
at 11:22 AM Dec 1 2017
Deposit Photos

Ask Jodi Sherman to identify a culprit in global climate change, and you'll get an unexpected answer. The anesthesiologist from Yale University doesn't name the usual suspects—carbon dioxide, like the kind that spews out of our cars, or methane, the gas packed into every cow burp. Instead, she points a finger at anesthesia, the tool most essential to her trade. “And it's just being released into the atmosphere with no control,” she says.

Sara Chodosh
at 11:22 AM Dec 1 2017
Deposit Photos
Science // 

If something claims to be a miracle cure—for cancer, for overeating, for run-of-the-mill acne—you should start by assuming it isn't. Life is hard and long and there are no easy shortcuts, especially when it comes to your health. That includes the internet darling that is apple cider vinegar.

Claire Maldarelli
at 11:22 AM Dec 1 2017
Fred Lewsey (Cambridge University)
Nature // 

One would assume that many of the strongest members of our species are elite athletes. And if particularly strong arms are what you're after, collegiate rowers—who routinely exert many times their body weight in power to propel a boat forward as fast as humanly possible—are about as good as it gets. But according to a new study, even elite female rowers have nothing on the arms of prehistoric women.

Ellen Airhart
at 11:22 AM Dec 1 2017
Wieger Wamelink
Nature // 

A Dutch scientist found two baby earthworms wriggling around in soil that is supposed to replicate the surface of Mars. But we're still pretty far away from gardening on the red planet.

Sara Chodosh
at 11:22 AM Dec 1 2017
Abdullah Khan, Snow Leopard Foundation
Nature // 

It would be easy to dismiss the myth of the yeti as just that: a myth. There's no conclusive evidence that a giant, ape-like creature lives in the Himalayas (or anywhere else, for that matter). But the beauty of science is that we don't just have to roll our eyes. We can test the hypothesis.

Mary Beth Griggs
at 11:22 AM Dec 1 2017
NASA
Space // 

It will be a glorious day when we finally get definitive proof of alien life. It's going to be absolutely amazing, whether we make contact with a species that rivals or exceeds us in intelligence or we accidentally squish an alien bug on a spaceship window.

Rob Verger
at 11:22 AM Dec 1 2017
NASA/JPL-Caltech
Drones // 

In a California warehouse in October, quadrocopter drones zoomed and buzzed, racing through an obstacle course of black-and-white checkered arches. On one team: drones guided by software and AI, the work of a team from NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. On the other: a drone steered by a human professional—Ken Loo, a Google engineer and Drone Racing League pilot.

 
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