Sophie Bushwick
at 11:36 AM Oct 5 2017
Pixabay
Science // 

So I was happy to hear about #NoRedOctober, a punny initiative started by PopSci's editor in chief that encourages people to cut red meat out of their diets for 31 days. But then I did a little math, and realized that we already have a better option: Meatless Mondays.

Rob Verger
at 11:36 AM Oct 5 2017
Apple
Fitness // 

Last week I splashed into an underground university pool with an Apple Watch Series 3. As the company's wearable has matured, Apple has marketed it more and more as a fitness device, one that's, thanks to a partnership with Nike, particularly well-suited as a running companion. But the Apple Watch also tackles something more dynamic and varied than your morning jog: exercise in the water.

Mary Beth Griggs
at 11:36 AM Oct 5 2017
NASA

It was 8:07 p.m. on a Friday night in Riverhead, Long Island, when the operators at an RCA Communications outpost picked up a signal that had never been heard before on Earth. A sharp, insistent beep sang out over short-wave radios, filling up our ears with the knowledge that humans had succeeded in sending something to the wispiest edge of our protective blanket of nitrogen, oxygen, and carbon dioxide.

Dennis Mersereau
at 15:53 PM Sep 20 2017
Dennis Mersereau
Science // 

The second scale-topping hurricane to make landfall in the past two weeks will tear through Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands on Wednesday, bringing to a climax one of the most severe hurricane seasons in recent memory. On Monday evening, Hurricane Maria rapidly strengthened into a category five shortly before striking the small island of Dominica. The tiny eye of the storm happened to hit the island of more than 70,000 people head-on, creating the latest in a string of humanitarian crises set forth by an unusually intense hurricane season. The island nation's prime minister reported on Tuesday morning that his country was devastated, grimly stating on Facebook that “we have lost all what money can buy and replace.”

Sara Chodosh
at 15:53 PM Sep 20 2017
Pexels
Science // 

About 36 million years ago, an asteroid slammed into Canada and created a fake diamond, which over the millennia degraded and transformed into a shiny black rock. Now, geologists have used that gem to confirm a new temperature record for the Earth's surface: 2370 degrees Celsius.

Mary Beth Griggs
at 15:53 PM Sep 20 2017
NASA
Space // 

We have discovered a planet. It gathers in light from its sun, and refuses to let go. In return, the star strips away the planet's atmosphere, slowly devouring it.

Kelsey D. Atherton
at 15:53 PM Sep 20 2017
Egan Airships

In 1908, five years after the Wright Brothers first flight at Kitty Hawk, U.S. Army Lieutenant Thomas Etholen Selfridge earned the dubious distinction as the first person to die in an airplane crash. In fact, the early years of aviation are littered with bodies. Last week, a pair of brothers in Washington state debuted an aircraft they see as the answer to the long-sought dream of perfectly safe flight. With a rigid, winged body held underneath a massive helium-containing envelope, their craft is billed as a fusion of both airplane and blimp technology. It is called “Plimp.”

David Nield
at 15:53 PM Sep 20 2017
Apple
Mobile // 

This week marks the official arrival of iOS 11, and Apple's latest operating system boasts quite a few party tricks that you're going to want to try out. Here are some of the best new features, from playing with the magic of augmented reality to adding a dock to your iPad interface.

Rob Verger
at 15:53 PM Sep 20 2017
Apple

Have you heard? Siri, the virtual persona that speaks from your iPhone, sounds different now. The new voice officially rolls out today as a part of Apple's latest mobile operating system, iOS 11. Her new pipes make her sound higher in pitch and younger. She's perkier and more personable. Most important, she sounds more human.

Nicole Wetsman
at 15:53 PM Sep 20 2017
Deposit Photos

In March, an episode of Law & Order SVU dove into murky scientific waters when it introduced a character claiming to have a gene that made him commit sexual assault. The story was never clear on what specific gene had supposedly doomed the defendant to such a life. But claiming to have DNA that predisposes one to commit a crime is decidedly non-fictional.

Mary Beth Griggs
at 15:53 PM Sep 20 2017
NASA

It sent back data until the last possible moment, struggling against the atmospheric forces that would soon vaporize the spacecraft into dust. Then, it was gone. Cassini's perfectly executed dive last week shuttered one of our few windows to the solar system.

Ellen Airhart
at 15:53 PM Sep 20 2017
Deposit Photos
Science // 

For all of 2016, Andrew Taylor ate only potatoes. There were a few caveats: He ate both white potatoes and sweet ones, and sometimes mixed in soymilk, tomato sauce, salt and herbs. He also took B12 supplements. But, overall, he ate potatoes for breakfast, lunch, and dinner. He took four blood tests over the year which he claims all came back normal. He even lost weight and felt more energized.

Sara Chodosh
at 15:53 PM Sep 20 2017
Deposit Photos
Fitness // 

The trouble with alcohol is that it's everywhere. We don't treat any other drug the way we treat alcohol, marijuana included, and in part that's because we mostly don't think of it as a drug. It's what you down a shot of to loosen up on the dance floor, or to ease your social anxieties at your company's holiday party. You know it's not good for you, sure, but it's a part of daily life. It's easy to stop thinking of alcohol like a drug—but it is one. And like any drug, you can become addicted to it without even realizing.

Jeremy Deaton
at 14:26 PM Sep 7 2017
Pixabay
Science // 

  Labor Day weekend delivered record-breaking temperatures to California as a heat wave swept the state, fanning the flames of the largest wildfire Los Angeles has seen in decades. The unusually warm weather bears the mark of climate change, which is fueling record heat around the globe.

Kelsey D. Atherton
at 14:26 PM Sep 7 2017
KCNA, via DPRK Today

Over the weekend, North Korea unveiled a new weapon. It is small, maybe small enough to fit in the nose cone of a missile. It is powerful, detonating with the force of possibly 140 kilotons, or almost 10 times the destructive power as “Little Boy,” the bomb dropped on Hiroshima in 1945. This thermonuclear warhead is shiny, bare metal like the naked skins of the early jets that first fought in the skies above Korea almost 67 years ago.

 
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