Claire Maldarelli
at 11:12 AM Apr 18 2017
Pixabay
Science // 

Vegetables are an incredibly healthy source of fuel—nutrient-packed and light on the calories. There's no question about that. And they're jam-packed with essential vitamins. But like any food, there's perhaps a million ways one can eat them: raw, steamed, baked, and even fried. But some enthusiasts claim that the process of cooking vegetables causes them to lose a portion of their nutritious value. Is this true? What's the most nutritious way to eat your veggies?

Rachel Feltman
at 11:12 AM Apr 18 2017
Marvin Altamia
Nature // 

In watching the giant shipworm Kuphus polythalamia ooze out of its shell like Tim Burton's idea of cake frosting, a few words might spring into your mind. "Science fiction plague," perhaps, or "dear god, why have you forsaken us," or "put that thing back where it came from, so help me." But Margo Haygood, a research professor in medicinal chemistry at the University of Utah College of Pharmacy, gushes that the worm is "the prize, the unicorn" of the shipworm world.

Sarah Fecht
at 11:12 AM Apr 18 2017
OceanGate
Science // 

Stockton Rush wants to take explorers into the deep sea. Not just scientific researchers or military personnel, but regular (well, wealthy) travelers on a quest of discovery. But don't call them tourists.

Kelsey D. Atherton
at 11:12 AM Apr 18 2017
Phil Schmitten, United States Department of Defense, via Wikimedia Commons

So, the Pentagon used a massive bomb against caves in eastern Afghanistan that currently house ISIS fighters, and previously housed insurgents fighting against British rule in the 19th century and mujahadeen fighting against Soviet control in the 20th century. For centuries, the caves of Afghanistan have made it difficult for outsiders to control the country. But in the early 21st century, the United States considered developing a brand new weapon to nullify these ancient defenses. The “Robust Nuclear Earth Penetrator” was an earthquake in a can, a nuclear bomb designed to seal the caves once and for all.

Rob Verger
at 11:12 AM Apr 18 2017
Google Research

Google went big on art this week. The company launched a platform to help people who are terrible at art communicate visually. It also published research about teaching art to another terrible stick-figure drawer: a neural network.

Kendra Pierre-Louis
at 12:22 PM Apr 13 2017
Pexels
Nature // 

From pesticides to caffeine, chemicals that affect living organisms are making their way into the nation's rivers and streams. That's the conclusion reached by a pair of complimentary studies by the US Geological Survey (USGS) and the US EPA, both published today in the journal Environmental Science and Technology.

Sara Chodosh
at 12:22 PM Apr 13 2017
NOAA/Wikimedia Commons
Science // 

Rare minerals might not sound as exciting as sunken treasure to you, but to the mining industry those materials could be literally more valuable than gold. And there are few regulations in place yet to stop deep sea mining from destroying the seafloor.

Stan Horaczek
at 12:22 PM Apr 13 2017
Adobe
Gadgets // 

Smartphone cameras aren't very good at taking flattering selfies. The wide angle lenses introduce unpleasant distortion, and the small camera sensors can't produce those blurry backgrounds we see in higher-end portraits. Of course, that doesn't stop people from shooting tons of them. Roughly 24 billion selfies were added to the Google Photos service in 2016, according to the company. Most of them, we're not ashamed to say, were garbage.

Sara Chodosh
at 12:22 PM Apr 13 2017
Pexels user Unsplash
Nature // 

Ants are good at lots of stuff. Carrying food, cutting leaves, biting people, and perhaps least well known: farming fungus. They're so good at farming, in fact, that they had unintentionally domesticated their fungus varietals long before humans got wind of farming. Or existed, for that matter.

Kendra Pierre-Louis
at 12:22 PM Apr 13 2017
Pexels
Science // 

Forget SpaceX. Oliver O'Reilly has a dilemma that actually affects our daily lives. “I have a chronic problem with my shoelaces—they keep untying,” he told PopSci. “I never understood quite why that happened.”

Claire Maldarelli
at 12:22 PM Apr 13 2017
Pixabay

Sleep is a time suck. If you multiplied the average recommended number of hours we should sleep in a day—eight for a typical adult—by the number of days in an average lifespan (78.8 years in the United States), that would amount to about 9,587.3 days. That's one third of your life spent unconscious. From an evolutionary standpoint, sleep is quite literally a waste of your time, yet it's fought its way through countless years of adaptation in nearly every living animal on Earth. So it must be important, right?

Sophie Bushwick and Billy Cadden
at 12:22 PM Apr 13 2017
Pixabay
Hacks // 

For most of us, a dishwasher is a magical machine that transforms sauce-crusted plates into clean ones. But if you only use it for tableware, you're wasting this fantastic device. After all, a surprisingly wide range of items can safely sit through a cycle.

Kendra Pierre-Louis
at 12:22 PM Apr 13 2017
NASA

If space travel were gymnastics, we'd say that Expedition 50—which returned early Monday morning from the International Space Station (ISS), stuck the landing. 

Rob Verger
at 11:22 AM Apr 7 2017
Reebok
Tech // 

There's a rush right now for clothing companies—especially those in the outdoor and athletic spaces—to find renewable materials for their wares. Reebok has chosen corn as its preferred sustainable building block for use in an upcoming sneaker, which is part of its Corn + Cotton initiative.

Sara Chodosh
at 11:22 AM Apr 7 2017
CDC/Wikimedia Commons

The Karelia regions of Finland and Russia are remarkably similar. They have unique architecture, they share a common heritage and genes, and speak similar dialects. But if you live on the Finnish side, you'll have around ten times as many neighbors with celiac disease.

 
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