Rob Verger
at 11:54 AM Oct 25 2017
Primer

Consider the job of an intelligence analyst—someone who has to sift through vast amounts of information and figure out the bigger narrative. The raw data this hypothetical analyst looks at could be anything from a report on the ground, to government statements, to items in the local media. The analyst's job—looking at data, synthesizing it in a report—is rich territory for artificial intelligence to help out, according to a new company called Primer.

Kendra Pierre-Louis
at 11:54 AM Oct 25 2017
Larry C. Price
Science // 

It isn't just air pollution that's a problem—water pollution like that pictured here in Bangladesh accounts for more than a million deaths per year.

Sara Chodosh
at 11:54 AM Oct 25 2017
Pixabay
Nature // 

You already know about antibiotic and pesticide resistance. You've heard that mice and rats evolve immunity to poisons. But there are other, sneakier ways that the rest of our planet's ecosystem has adapted to humanity's presence.

Claire Maldarelli
at 11:03 AM Oct 23 2017
Deposit Photos

Before any medication, vaccine, or other drug therapy reaches human use, it goes through extensive testing in the lab—often in animals, and typically in mice. This step in the evaluation process is extremely important. The way a drug affects a cluster of cells in a Petri dish often has little to do with the way it will behave inside a living organism, where multiple organ systems are at play.

Lacey Wallace/The Conversation
at 11:03 AM Oct 23 2017
Depositphotos
Science // 

When Stephen Paddock opened fire Oct. 1 on concertgoers in Las Vegas, killing 59, the city became the unfortunate host of one of the deadliest mass shootings in U.S. history. Investigators are still trying to piece together the events that took place that evening, and why.

Kendra Pierre-Louis
at 11:03 AM Oct 23 2017
Depositphotos
Nature // 

Mosquitoes are weird fliers. Your typical air-jackey —a sparrow or a fruit fly, for instance—takes flight by jumping into the air. Only once aloft do they begin to flap their wings.

Sara Chodosh
at 11:03 AM Oct 23 2017
Pixabay
Nature // 

The problem with dogs is that they're a lot like babies that never grow up. This is both a great strength and a huge annoyance, mostly because they can't talk. Researchers who study infant learning and behavior have to rely on other cues, like how long subjects look at an object, because asking them questions is just a big waste of time. Dogs are the same, and that makes it very difficult to come to definitive conclusions about their behavior and what it means.

Jane A. Flegal and Andrew Maynard/The Conversation
at 10:57 AM Oct 23 2017
Still from 'Geostorm'
Science // 

Hollywood's latest disaster flick, “Geostorm,” is premised on the idea that humans have figured out how to control the Earth's climate. A powerful satellite-based technology allows users to fine-tune the weather, overcoming the ravages of climate change. Everyone, everywhere can quite literally “have a nice day,” until—spoiler alert!—things do not go as planned.

Mary Beth Griggs
at 10:57 AM Oct 23 2017
NASA
Space // 

Earth is a planet of habit. It rigorously adheres to a whirlwind of a daily schedule, spinning through its tasks (mostly: spinning.) In terms of long-term plans, it has those down too. It orbits the Sun every 365 days 5 hours 48 minutes 46 seconds, thank-you-very-much.

Stan Horaczek
at 10:57 AM Oct 23 2017
Adobe

Every year at its Max conference, Adobe gives "sneak peeks" at new tech that will one day make its way into apps like Photoshop, and its video editing software Premiere. These demos gave us our first look at Adobe's seemingly magic Content Aware Fill tool, which automatically replaces objects when you Photoshop them out. This year's tech demos show off some truly impressive image editing feats, all of which is powered by the machine learning tech Adobe calls Sensei. Here are some of the most impressive.

Nicole Wetsman
at 10:57 AM Oct 23 2017
Deposit Photos
Fitness // 

Before the mile run each year in middle school, on the dreaded walk down from the classroom to the course, my classmates would argue over the best way to prevent a side stitch. More so than turning an ankle or coming in last, that repetitive stabbing pain is what the majority of us dreaded most. Our cures ranged across the map from taught techniques, like breathing in through the nose and out through the mouth and not eating for three hours prior, to my favorite: Punching yourself in the stomach at the slightest hint of pain (don't try it, it doesn't work).

Stan Horaczek
at 10:57 AM Oct 23 2017
Microsoft
Gadgets // 

The $400 Lenovo Explorer headset is built for Mixed Reality with front-facing cameras to integrate the environment.

Kate Baggaley
at 10:57 AM Oct 23 2017
Depositphotos

Earlier this year, the US Air Force Office of Special Investigations reported that a cold case of nearly 14 years had finally been cracked. In 2015, a woman who was attacked by her Air Force instructor in 2000 had been able to describe a family portrait she noticed in his home. The instructor denied that it had ever hung on his wall—until the prosecution projected a photo of his family sitting on their living room sofa with the portrait visible behind them.

Kendra Pierre-Louis
at 10:57 AM Oct 23 2017
Pexels
Nature // 

Bugs, well, bug a lot of people. There's nothing quite as irritating as a fly buzzing around a room (except, perhaps, the constant itching of a bug bite). It's hard to look at a mosquito, with its habit of spreading diseases like malaria and Zika, and not think we'd be better off without them.

Rob Verger
at 10:57 AM Oct 23 2017
Apple
Mobile // 

Your smartphone is powered by a chip. The new iPhones, including the upcoming iPhone X, use one called an A11 Bionic, and other handsets, like the Pixel 2, pack a Snapdragon 835. But chips in modern phones are not homogeneous pieces of silicon—they have specialised components, or hardware blocks, on them. Because of these multiple elements, processors like these are referred to as a “system on a chip.” One of those blocks is the image signal processor, which takes the data from your camera and makes it into a photograph. Another part of the chip is the graphics processing unit, or GPU, and it's responsible for an increasing number of your phone's fanciest features.

 
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