Jeffrey Lin and P.W. Singer
at 09:08 AM Jun 7 2017
China Daily
Drones // 

Meet China's huge solar-powered drone, a 130-foot-wide machine designed to fly at more than 65,000 feet, for days on end. How? A super lightweight body and renewable energy tech that can power all eight of its electrical propellers.

Claire Maldarelli
at 09:08 AM Jun 7 2017

Binge and excessive drinking almost always get a bad rap—and for good reason. Heavy alcohol consumption is known to lead to a multitude of problems, including poor brain health. But the effects of moderate drinking on a person's cognitive abilities have gotten less attention. In a study out this week in the British Medical Journal (BMJ), researchers following the brain health of 550 individuals found that subjects who were considered moderate drinkers—those who drank five glasses of wine or four pints of beer a week—showed a reduction in the volume of their hippocampi, an area of the brain associated with memory and learning.

Sara Kiley Watson
at 09:08 AM Jun 7 2017
North Carolina State University
Science // 

What started with a trip to the pediatrician has now led North Carolina State University researchers to develop new ways of figuring out the age of young human skeletal remains. The new technique uses X-rays of the frontal sinus, a large cavity behind the forehead which fills with mucus that drains into the nose, to determine the age of developing skulls.

Rachel Feltman
at 09:08 AM Jun 7 2017
Pexels

Tattoos are, to use a scientific term, flippin' sweet. And they're increasingly popular: more than a third of U.S. adults ages 18 to 40 have at least one. But side-eye from your old-school boss isn't the only thing you risk when you get new ink: these living pieces of art are open wounds as they heal, which leaves you vulnerable to all sorts of discomfort—and infection.

Kendra Pierre-Louis
at 09:08 AM Jun 7 2017
Pexels
Science // 

One size fits all nutrition may be a thing of the past. For instance, whole-wheat bread is better for you than white bread, right? Maybe. According to a study published today in the journal Cell Metabolism, the answer depends on the bacteria in your gut.

Aparna Nathan
at 09:08 AM Jun 7 2017
Zack Johnson
Nature // 

You might not expect it, but the prairie vole has something to teach you about relationships. A recent study of these rodents, published last week in Nature, helps unveil what happens when love (or at least something like it) is on the brain.

Sara Chodosh
at 10:00 AM Jun 6 2017
Pixabay

'FDA approval' has a certain glow of authority to it. To be FDA approved is to be safe, effective, and proven. Or at least, it technically is. Technically, FDA approval is a stringent process that requires a degree of proof. You might like to think that you couldn't get away with claiming something went through that process if it never really did. But you'd be wrong. And if you wanted to, say, market an unproven negative ion bracelet as a treatment for 'harmful' electromagnetic fields that aren't actually harmful, you could totally get away with it.

Kendra Pierre-Louis
at 10:00 AM Jun 6 2017
NASA

Close your eyes and picture what the Earth looks like. You're probably picturing a circle, mostly blue thanks to the ocean, with swirls of clouds and the occasional green and brown land mass. The entire sphere is floating in a mass of impossible black. You're picturing Earth in a way that you've never actually seen with your own two eyes. Maybe you're getting the sketch from this famous shot, below, known as the blue marble image. Astronauts aboard the Apollo 17 space mission snapped the picture on December 7th, 1972. Countless other images of our home planet have been taken, which have forever shaped our imagination of it. Still, only a handful of humans have seen it with naked eyes.

Marlene Cimons
at 10:00 AM Jun 6 2017
Pixabay
Energy // 

You know it as a white smudge across the lifeguard's nose, or a soothing cream on your baby's bottom. But someday, the white ointment that protects our skin could generate electricity on your roof or in your car.

Mary Beth Griggs
at 10:00 AM Jun 6 2017
NASA/JPL-Caltech/R. Hurt (IPAC)

About 650 light years away, a planet hotter than many stars is hurtling around its sun, leaving a glowing trail of gas in its wake like some sort of superheated comet.

Kate Baggaley
at 10:00 AM Jun 6 2017

The vaccines we have today are pretty incredible. They've eradicated smallpox, purged rubella from the Americas, and save millions of people each year from dying of diphtheria, tetanus, whooping cough, and measles. When enough people get vaccinated, infectious diseases can't spread easily and everyone benefits from herd immunity.

Mary Beth Griggs
at 09:29 AM Jun 5 2017
Gao/Li/Wu/Brown University/Tsingua University
Tech // 

It's light enough to balance on a fuzzy blade of grass, incredibly heat-resistant, and can be squished like a marshmallow. It's also a ceramic.

Sara Chodosh
at 09:29 AM Jun 5 2017
Pixabay

This should go without saying, but because it apparently doesn't, here goes: don't stick random items into your vagina. Tampons, certified body-safe sex toys, physician-approved devices, and penises should really be the only things that go in there. And honestly be careful with some of the penises because they're not all as clean as they should be.

Claire Maldarelli
at 09:29 AM Jun 5 2017
NASA/JPL
Science // 

Come September, NASA will be saying goodbye to one of its best image-churning machines, the Cassini spacecraft. In honor of its impending retirement, we've collected 52 of our favorite Cassini images for your viewing pleasure. The image above is a false color image of Saturn's rings. The purple color indicates that those areas are dominated by particles larger than two inches, while green shows areas where particles are less than two inches across.

Jeffrey Lin and P.W. Singer
at 09:29 AM Jun 5 2017
Paramount Pictures

In Tom Clancy's book (and, later, the 1990 film) The Hunt For Red October, a Soviet submarine debuts a revolutionary, ultra-quiet engine that uses pumpjets and electrical propulsion technology to elude its foes. Chinese state media has reported that the nation is fitting its newest nuclear sub with an engine that sounds a lot like Clancy's imaginings in the real world.

 
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