Sara Chodosh
at 09:56 AM Jun 20 2017
Asher Flatt
Nature // 

The abyss is back, and this time it spat up a penis (worm). At the end of May, we brought you a roundup of the strangest creatures dragged from the depths of the Australian abyssal zone, and you probably thought nature couldn't get any weirder. But then over the weekend, Twitter got itself all in a tizzy over this:

Kendra Pierre-Louis
at 09:56 AM Jun 20 2017
Nature // 

It killed 739 people in Chicago 1995. In Europe in 2003, it claimed another 70,000 lives. Just seven years later, it would take down 55,000 more in Russia. Extreme heat can and does kill. And while those heatwaves garnered global attention, according to a study released today in the journal Nature, they're more common than we think. The study's authors note that worldwide, some 30 percent of people are exposed to life-threatening extreme heat for at least 20 days of each year. If we do nothing to reduce climate changing emissions that are helping to push the mercury higher, they write, 74 percent of people will experience routine extreme heat events by 2100. And as is already the case today, at least some of those people will die.

Kelsey D. Atherton
at 09:56 AM Jun 20 2017
Royal Navy, via Wikimedia Commons

Every missile is a carefully packaged bad day traveling at high speeds. Hypersonic missiles are a modern development in the long-running military arms race to figure out just how certain that bad end is for the humans on the receiving end. Russia's Zircon missile could enter arsenals as early as 2018. Despite headlines to the contrary, not enough about the missile is known yet to definitely claim that it poses an uncounterable threats ships in the sea.

Sarah Fecht
at 09:56 AM Jun 20 2017
Böhringer Friedrich via Wiki Commons
Nature // 

Fortune doesn't always favor the bold. Whereas male elk tend to live fast and die by age 5, some female elk have been known to live to the ripe old age of 20.

Sophie Bushwick
at 09:30 AM Jun 17 2017
NASA
Science // 

From a Chinese satellite drifting through suborbital space, a laser beamed pairs of entangled photons to two separate locations on the ground. Although 746 miles separated each member of the pair, the light particles remained mysteriously connected. The experiment, the results of which were published today in the journal Science, smashed the previous distance record for a phenomenon called entanglement. It may sound esoteric, but it could pave the way for breakthroughs, most specifically a super-secure global communications network with uncrackable quantum encryption that protects every message from prying eyes.

Corinne Iozzio
at 09:30 AM Jun 17 2017
Amazon
Science // 

Amazon has unveiled the second generation of its Dash Wand, an Alexa-enabled home barcode scanner that adds grocery items to an AmazonFresh cart. Yesterday, the Dash was a promotional tool, a way for Prime members in five urban markets (New York, Philadelphia, Seattle, and Northern and Southern California) to get back-doored into the $15/month AmazonFresh grocery delivery service.

Jeffrey Lin and P.W. Singer
at 09:30 AM Jun 17 2017
Grassroots (artist)

American and Chinese defense giants are moving quickly to reach the edge of space, aiming to launch hypersonic aircraft that can cross continents in under an hour. What exactly does hypersonic mean? Speeds of over Mach 5, or more than 3,835 miles per hour.

Sarah Fecht
at 09:30 AM Jun 17 2017
lin padgham via Wiki Commons
Nature // 

El Niño has given us a preview of West Antarctica's future, and things do not look good. For two weeks in January of 2016, unusually warm weather caused a 300,000 square mile patch of the Ross Ice Shelf to partially melt. The roughly Texas-sized area, blanketed in a slushy mixture of ice and water, represents one of the first times scientists have been able to catch such widespread Antarctic melting in action. The findings were published this week in Nature Communications.

Cassidy Mayeda
at 09:30 AM Jun 17 2017
By Brian Skerry
Science // 

The week, the science, the images, the technology, the future, the vibe - it's all here in convenient consumable form!

Stan Horaczek
at 09:30 AM Jun 17 2017
TaylorMade
Gadgets // 

In 2007, Nike introduced a driver called the Sumo. It was immediately identifiable because of its square head shape as well as the signature sound it made when impacting the ball. The noise in question was a loud “clank” that many players found annoying. “The Sumo had a very strong frequency content around 2,000-3,000 hertz,” says Daniel A. Russell, a professor of acoustics at Pennsylvania State University's College of Engineering. “That's right where the human ear is most responsive to sound.”

Aparna Nathan
at 09:30 AM Jun 17 2017
Alan D. Wilson
Nature // 

Imagine: vast expanses of frozen sea, stretching from the northern coast of Alaska into the Arctic horizon. Welcome to the Southern Beaufort Sea—or at least, the Southern Beaufort Sea as it used to be. This icy Arctic ecosystem is dominated by the majestic polar bear, but warmer temperatures are changing both the landscape and its inhabitants.

Marlene Cimons
at 09:30 AM Jun 17 2017
Jefferson Patterson Park and Museum
Fitness // 

On a recent Sunday morning, 93-year-old Bernie Fowler laced up his white sneakers and waded into Maryland's Patuxent River, a tributary of the Chesapeake Bay, just as he has done every June for the past 30 years. He was conducting his annual test of water clarity by seeing how deep he could go and still see the tops of his shoes.

Mary Beth Griggs
at 09:30 AM Jun 17 2017
Christopher Johnson, Berkeley Seismological Laboratory, UC Berkeley
Science // 

Natural forces shape every inch of our globe, but in California, the two big players are water falling out of the sky (or the lack thereof) and earthquakes.

Sara Kiley Watson
at 09:30 AM Jun 17 2017
Pexels
Science // 

I think we can all admit to getting a little emotional after a few too many glasses of wine. But according to a study done at the University of Adelaide, our emotional response to wine actually begins much earlier. They found that wine descriptions could make study subjects feel more emotional about booze, perhaps making them more likely to buy it as a result.

Kendra Pierre-Louis
at 09:30 AM Jun 17 2017
Pexels
Science // 

Lentil soup may be the mental fruit and ginger root might be good for the youth, to paraphrase an old hip-hop song, but hearing about how nutritious a food is will only make Americans pass on the peas. According to a research letter published earlier this week in the Journal of American Medical Association Internal Medicine, to actually get Americans to eat their fruits and veggies we need to give up on the health labels—and instead market them as indulgences. The researchers found giving veggies labels like "twisted citrus-glazed carrots," "sweet sizzilin' green beans and crispy shallots,” and “dynamite chili and tangy lime-seasoned beets” made us more likely to put them on our plate.

 
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