Kendra Pierre-Louis
at 12:59 PM Aug 4 2017
Zero G/Steve Boxall
Space // 

I did not throw up. When I tell people that I've ridden in a zero-g plane, invariably they ask, propriety be damned, if I threw up. So, it's best to address that aspect of zero-g straight away. Though I dutifully stick the company issued barf bag in my flight suit's pocket—just in case—my stomach's contents remain my stomach's contents through the many 30-to-40 second cycles of less than Earth's gravity. Five other fliers—all men—are significantly less fortunate.

Marlene Cimons
at 12:59 PM Aug 4 2017
Pexels
Science // 

We already know how prolonged drought, high heat and heavy rains prompted by climate change can wreak havoc on agriculture. But there is more disturbing news.

Cici Zhang
at 12:59 PM Aug 4 2017
Alexey Kljatov on Flickr via CC 2.0
Science // 

Snow can be soft and fluffy or stinging and icy; perfect for skiing or prone to melt. The difference lies in the shape of the flakes. They don't all look like the kind you see in emoji. Researchers have classified as many as 108 types, but according to Kenneth Libbrecht, a physicist at the California Institute of Technology, you can pare them down to four broad categories: plates, columns, needles, and dendrites.

Sara Chodosh
at 12:59 PM Aug 4 2017
NASA/JPL-Caltech
Space // 

Defending Earth from aliens sounds like a big job, but the bigger one is actually defending alien life from us. The position NASA is hiring for—with the amazing title of Planetary Protection Officer—is probably nothing like the image conjured by the trending headlines.

Jeffrey Lin and P.W. Singer
at 10:02 AM Aug 1 2017
Oedo Soldier

As part of its celebration of the People's Liberation Army, the Military Museum of the Chinese People's Revolution in Beijing is showing off a range of exciting exhibitions, offering a peek into the PLA's new self-propelled artillery, cruise missiles, ballistic missile launchers, and—perhaps most notably—tactical unmanned aerial systems.

Aparna Nathan
at 10:02 AM Aug 1 2017
NASA
Science // 

Millions of people are expected to turn their heads skyward to watch the Great American Eclipse on August 21. You might be one of them. But did you know that you can enjoy this natural wonder while also helping scientists out? Here are four ways that you too can be an eclipse scientist—at least for a day.

Sara Kiley Watson
at 10:02 AM Aug 1 2017
Fitness // 

Ever woken up the day after a workout and wondered what you did to deserve such pain?

Kendra Pierre-Louis
at 10:02 AM Aug 1 2017
Deposit Photos
Science // 

  A DNA-based sunscreen that not only stops harmful ultraviolet (UV) light, but also becomes more protective the longer you expose it to UV rays? That's the dazzling premise behind a recent study published in the journal Science Reports.

Kelsey D. Atherton
at 10:02 AM Aug 1 2017
Screenshot by author, from YouTube
Drones // 

Every armory is a potential explosion waiting to happen. And in Eastern Ukraine, a stockpile of ammunition recently ignited, spewing smoke and fire into the sky in a dramatic video. The culprit? A small drone carrying a 1-pound grenade armed with the pyrotechnic substance thermite.

Kate Baggaley
at 10:02 AM Aug 1 2017
Antara Palkar

It takes a hookworm four to six weeks to travel through the human body and reach the gut, where it latches onto the small intestine and sucks blood to sustain itself.

Sara Chodosh
at 10:02 AM Aug 1 2017
Stocksnap
Nature // 

Every year on Easter in the Otago region of New Zealand, people gather to shoot thousands of bunnies. A police officer is on hand, not to arrest the hunters but rather to spur them on. This is the annual Easter bunny hunt, and by the time the day is done there will be literal piles of rabbit carcasses.

Claire Maldarelli
at 10:02 AM Aug 1 2017
Wikimedia Commons
Science // 

There are countless ways for a person to develop cancer, and this tangle of biological routes leading to illness can make it more difficult for researchers to develop treatments and cures. Scientists have already done a lot of work on sequencing the genes of cancer cells. That's given them insight into what a cancer cell looks like and how it grows endlessly. But to know what fuels those cells, and where they come from, scientists had to plot a course back to each cell's source.

Mary Beth Griggs
at 17:00 PM Jul 28 2017
Jianya Li, Adam D. Celiz, David J. Mooney

Listen, Humpty Dumpty, I hate to break it to you, but while there are certain medical situations where a bandage is good enough to stick you back together again, this is not one of them. Sometimes, even the best intentions (and combined efforts of the reigning monarch's horses and men) aren't enough. Please, go consult with the slug mucus experts immediately.

Kendra Pierre-Louis
at 17:00 PM Jul 28 2017
NASA Earth Observatory
Science // 

When we think about how climate change will impact water, we “tend to think about droughts or flooding or extreme rainfall,” says Anna Michalak. “But the linkages between climate and water quality are potentially just as strong as climate and water quantity.”

Aparna Nathan
at 17:00 PM Jul 28 2017
Pixabay
Nature // 

Male territoriality is a pretty well-defined scientific concept. Some animals mark their domain with rocks or urine, others attack intruders (and we've all seen guys who pick fights at the bar).

 
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