Josh Chamot
at 10:52 AM Aug 26 2016
Pixabay
Nature // 

As the planet warms, insects will migrate into new habitats and environments as they adapt. However, the cockroach is already among the most adapted animals on the planet—will it weather climate change unfazed? For some insight into the not-so-humble cockroach and its future, Nexus Media News reached out to journalist Richard Schweid, author of The Cockroach Papers: A Compendium of History and Lore.

Stacy Morford
at 10:52 AM Aug 26 2016
Pixabay
Tech // 

Large-scale groundwater pumping is opening doors for dangerously high levels of arsenic to enter some of Southeast Asia's aquifers, with water now seeping in through riverbeds with arsenic concentrations more than 100 times the limits of safety, according to a new study from scientists at Columbia University's Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, MIT, and Hanoi University of Science.

Mary Beth Griggs
at 10:52 AM Aug 26 2016
Jeff Williams

Jeff Williams' father was a seasonal Park Ranger with the National Park Service, taking his family out to Wyoming every summer.

Kate Baggaley
at 10:52 AM Aug 26 2016
Nature // 

As climate change warps the preferred habitats of mammals, birds and amphibians, these animals will be forced to flee. A beautiful but troubling new map predicts what this massive migration might look like for North and South America.

Charles Q. Choi
at 10:52 AM Aug 26 2016

The dramatic announcement that a small rocky planet might exist in the nearest star system to the sun, Alpha Centauri, raises the hope that we might be able to send probes to an alien world in our lifetimes.

Carl Franzen
at 10:52 AM Aug 26 2016
Xavier Harding/Popular Science
Mobile // 

If you have an iPhone, stop what you're doing and update it to the latest operating system, iOS 9.3.5 (to do this, go to your Settings app, tap "General," and then "Software Update." Then tap "Download and Install"). Why? As Motherboard reports today, security researchers have found a new malicious program that can secretly bypass the security on your iPhone and capture almost all of your data, including all your texts, phone calls, emails, even burrowing into your Facebook and Gmail apps.

Kate Baggaley
at 10:52 AM Aug 26 2016
Oculus
Nature // 

The National Park Service's 100th birthday celebration continues. In case Google's 360-degree tours haven't sated your appetite for natural landscapes, you can now take a virtual reality tour of Yosemite narrated by President Obama.

Kate Baggaley
at 10:52 AM Aug 26 2016
Kaori Wakabayashi of Hiroshima University, originally published in Plankton and Benthos Research.
Nature // 

To protect themselves from the stinging jellyfish they dine on, young lobsters swath their poop in a special membrane, scientists in Japan reported today in the journal Plankton and Benthos Research.

Mary Beth Griggs
at 10:52 AM Aug 26 2016
Nature // 

Just in time for the National Park Service's 100th birthday Google has released a new interactive project that takes viewers into five different national parks.

Kate Baggaley
at 10:52 AM Aug 26 2016
Tech // 

A man has used his thoughts to activate tiny robots inside a cockroach. This technology could eventually give people more control over when and where a medication is active in their body. The experiment, published August 15 in PLOS ONE, demonstrates how nanobots made out of DNA can open and shut as needed to dispense drugs inside an animal.

Kelsey D. Atherton
at 10:52 AM Aug 26 2016
Screenshot by author, from YouTube

When all of life feels like a war, every missile is a success. North Korea, a tightly controlled dictatorship locked in a shadowboxing match with the entire western world, keeps building and testing new missiles. Worse still, the missiles keep getting better. On Wednesday, a North Korean submarine fired missile traveled over 300 miles towards Japan, demonstrating an uncomfortable degree of success with the technology.

Kelsey D. Atherton
at 10:52 AM Aug 26 2016
DigitalGlobe

On a clear day, the sky hides nothing from space. For more than half a century, spy satellites have circled the globe, taking pictures of the world below. First launched by the United States and the Soviet Union as ways to keep tabs on each other, satellite photography progressed from a state secret to a common mapping tool, with public photos taken from space available to anyone with an internet connection. But what if satellites did more? What if, instead of just showing us what the world looks like from above, they interpreted those images to identify buildings and other objects?

Kelsey D. Atherton
at 10:52 AM Aug 26 2016
United States Patent and Trademark Office
Tech // 

Artillery is a tool of destruction. Howitzers, in particularly, are a kind of weapon great for lobbing explosions up through the air and over objects to crash down on foes. So why is defense and aviation giant Boeing looking to howitzers as a way to fight forest fires?

Jeffrey Lin and P.W. Singer
at 10:52 AM Aug 26 2016
xyz at China Defense Forum

On August 23, the Chinese National Space Administration announced details of China's first Martian probe; a lander and rover. The Martian probe, whose name will be selected after a global contest, will be launched in 2020. That target is set for when Earth and Mars reach the closest proximity in 26 months. It will take off from the Wenchang Launch Center on Hainan island, and reach Mars in 2021 after a seven month voyage.

Dennis Mersereau
at 10:52 AM Aug 26 2016
NOAA/NASA
Nature // 

How do you warn people in the path of a potential tropical storm or hurricane to get out of the way when that potential storm is nothing but a messy blob of clouds hundreds of miles away, and only several days from possible landfall in the U.S.?

 
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