G. Clay Whittaker
at 10:42 AM May 20 2016
YouTube
Science // 

Imagine a world where wildlife drawn to six-pack rings aren't slowly killed, but treated to a delicious snack.

Jason Lederman
at 10:42 AM May 20 2016
CBS
Science // 

We know that CBS' new, still-untitled Star Trek series will premiere in January 2017, both on television and CBS' streaming service All Access. We know after the first episode, one episode will come out per week exclusively on All Access, which costs $5.99 per month. We know the show will TV series creator Bryan FullerHannibalbe run by , who worked on both Star Trek: Deep Space 9 (DS9) and Star Trek: Voyager. And now, we have our first look of the newest addition to the 50-year-old franchise.

Mary Beth Griggs
at 10:40 AM May 20 2016

Today, the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) announced the winners of its Wearable Alcohol Biosensor Challenge, which was designed to create an easily wearable monitor for alcohol research studies, or personal use to monitor drinking.

Kelsey D. Atherton
at 10:40 AM May 20 2016
Bill Solomou, Commonwealth of Australia, Department of Defence

Humans have only flown for a few centuries. Balloons, the earliest human fliers, were not what anyone would call fast. Airplanes, first flown in 1903, started slow, and even now, the majority of human flight is subsonic, with only the highest-end military jets regularly clearing the sound barrier.

Mary Beth Griggs
at 10:40 AM May 20 2016
Tech // 

A multitude of Hyperloop projects are springing up across the country, at startups and universities.

G. Clay Whittaker
at 10:40 AM May 20 2016
YouTube
Robots // 

A Harvard-turned-MIT researcher and his colleagues just dropped some pretty cool Spider-Man tech in the latest issue of Science magazine: surface clinging via "electrostatic adhesion." It's a widely applicable breakthrough that will, for instance, keep future robots perched while they wait for instructions.

Dave Gershgorn
at 10:40 AM May 20 2016
Google

Yesterday at Google's I/O developers conference, CEO Sundar Pichai briefly spoke about a custom-built chip that helps give Google its edge in machine learning and artificial intelligence. The chip, dubbed a TPU or Tensor Processing Unit (in keeping with Google's A.I. platform TensorFlow), is specifically wrought for running Google's decision-making algorithms. Most companies like Facebook and Microsoft use GPUs for their machine learning and artificial intelligence.

Kelsey D. Atherton
at 10:40 AM May 20 2016
Craig Chandler, University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Drones // 

Nature surrounds itself in kindling and expects to burn. The North American plains benefit from periodic fires, and to maintain that balance, U.S. Forest Service regularly prescribes burns because they “reduce hazardous fuels, protecting human communities from extreme fires, minimize the spread of pest insects and disease, remove unwanted species that threaten species native to an ecosystem.” Setting those fires can be risky for humans, which is why a team at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln designed a drone to do the job.

G. Clay Whittaker
at 10:40 AM May 20 2016
YouTube
Science // 

Ah, summer. The season of waterballoons, and trampolines, and... both at the same time? Sure why not.

Kelsey D. Atherton
at 10:40 AM May 20 2016
Screenshot by author, from YouTube
Make // 

The robot looked at the woods and saw a home. Cameras scanned the trees and algorithms plotted the shape of the wood, finding the center lines and individual strength. Mechanical brains tessellated the shape into a working form, and the robot knew what it must build.

Carl Franzen
at 10:40 AM May 20 2016

"Augmented reality" is a phrase that you've probably come across if you read Popular Science. It's kind of a loose, ill-fitting blanket term, but it basically refers to technologies that layer digital images and information over a person's view of the real world (instead of virtual reality, which cuts you off from the real world and replaces it with an entirely virtual one). Companies like Microsoft and Google are putting millions of dollars into this tech, and Snapchat already kind of has it in the form of the "Lenses," those weird filters that let users distort their faces with funny (sometimes racist) digital costuming.

Mary Beth Griggs
at 10:40 AM May 20 2016
Alexis Rodriguez
Space // 

Over three billion years ago, Mars had water. A lot more water than it has now.

G. Clay Whittaker
at 10:40 AM May 20 2016

Glasses and contacts will become a lot more common in the next few decades, as will cataracts, according to the National Institutes of Health.

G. Clay Whittaker
at 10:40 AM May 20 2016
US Patent and Trademark Office
Cars // 

If you are ever struck by a self-driven car in the future, then you might finally understand how a bug feels on your windshield--except you'll have a better chance of surviving.

Shannon Stirone
at 10:40 AM May 20 2016
NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute/Steve Gribben
Space // 

The Pluto flyby was arguably one of 2015's top scientific achievements, maybe even one of the most memorable moments in the last decade. We now know what our ex-ninth planet looks like, and it's spectacular. Pluto turned out to have some surprising features like glaciers, nitrogen lakes, ice volcanoes, and the list is growing. The New Horizons mission to Pluto has surpassed everyone's expectations, and the good news is, the team has no plans of stopping yet. This summer, they're hoping to win an extended mission to explore another strange new world.

 
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