Kelsey D. Atherton
at 10:12 AM Jun 29 2016
Andrew Porch, U.S. Army, via Wikimedia Common

Most of war is about not dying. For every new development in ways to make people dead, there are other, elaborate ways to keep squishy vulnerable humans intact, in good health, and well rested enough to do their jobs. It is this second science, the science of staying alive in conditions built for death, that forms the whole of science journalist Mary Roach's latest work, Grunt: the Curious Science of Humans at War. For everything other than the killing, it's a masterful, digestible look a the science of war.

Samantha Cole
at 10:12 AM Jun 29 2016
NASA/ESA Hubble

A "tadpole galaxy" has wiggled into view of the Hubble space telescope. Released today, these images show an outstretched galaxy that's rare for our neighborhood of the universe. Its name is LEDA 36252, also known as Kiso 5639.

Coby McDonald
at 10:12 AM Jun 29 2016
Courtesy of Timo Gissibl

If you've ever wanted to take photographs of the inside of your spleen, you may be in luck. Scientists at the University of Stuttgart in Germany have created a camera so tiny it can be injected into your body through a syringe.

Meaghan Lee Callaghan
at 10:12 AM Jun 29 2016
Karen / Flickr
Tech // 

You shake, fill with water, squeeze and pound. You let it sit upside down for a week or two. Trying to get the final dollop of shampoo out of the bottle can be frustrating. We've all been there.

Corey Mueller
at 10:12 AM Jun 29 2016
Flickr user Arizona Shona

Pat Summitt, former women's basketball coach at the University of Tennessee, passed away Tuesday morning at age 64, after having been diagnosed with early onset Alzheimer's disease in 2011.

Mary Beth Griggs
at 10:12 AM Jun 29 2016
Tech // 

Roads here aren't paved with gold, but one day they might be paved with pig manure. And that's not a bad thing.

Kelsey D. Atherton
at 10:12 AM Jun 29 2016
Galina Kantor, Elbit Systems

A robotic ship fired a torpedo into the ocean without any humans aboard. Naval battles, for so long the domain of sailors fighting each other and the elements all at once, can now be in part delegated to machines. The vessel responsible is the Seagull Unmanned Surface Vessel, made by Israel's Elbit Systems. With a splash and a blast, it is leading oceanic warfare into the future.

Mary Beth Griggs
at 10:12 AM Jun 29 2016
Science // 

Today in strange and wonderful videos comes this demonstration of a gel that seems to defy gravity.

Coby McDonald
at 10:12 AM Jun 29 2016
Photo by Rebecca Siegel (CC BY 2.0)

Many urban trains - and in this study, specifically the New York subways - are crowded--and not just with people. Sharing your commute are trillions of invisible microbes. They're on the seats, poles, ticket kiosks; pretty much on anything people hold, lean against, sneeze on, swipe, or bump into. "We're constantly shedding bugs into our environment," says Curtis Huttenhower, an associate professor at Harvard's School of Public Health.

Claire Maldarelli
at 10:12 AM Jun 29 2016
Jeff Miller/UW-Madison

As the Zika virus continues to infect people in many parts of Brazil and South America, ​health officials remain concerned about rising rates of Zika-related birth defects like microcephaly. Babies are still being born with microcephaly (a condition that includes abnormally small skull size and associated brain defects), and the babies born when the outbreak first began are now turning one.

Kelsey D. Atherton
at 10:12 AM Jun 29 2016
ARL / Penn State

Things travel faster through air than they do through water. This would be irrelevant information for sea-bound submarines, were it not for the phenomena of supercavitation, where a submerged vessel creates a bubble around itself and then speeds through the sea. A Russian torpedo that released bubbles traveled as fast as 230 mph. Now, a team of researchers at Penn State are working on adapting the same science to a submarine.

Meaghan Lee Callaghan
at 10:12 AM Jun 29 2016
NASA
Science // 

Brutal winter conditions may be may be keeping scientists from gathering the best data on the flow and impact of carbon emissions in the Arctic.

Xavier Harding
at 10:12 AM Jun 29 2016
Amazon
Gadgets // 

Amazon Echo serves as the retail company's always listening home device, which allows its voice controlled virtual assistant Alexa to serve many of your requests, such as reading out the news or weather forecast, and setting timers.

Ryan F. Mandelbaum
at 10:12 AM Jun 29 2016
George Levay
Gaming // 

Online gaming can be an equalizer, a place where it doesn't matter what you look like so long as you're killing the crap out of every other character. Double arm amputee George Levay knows that better than most. He's the one beating you.

Jason Tetro
at 10:12 AM Jun 29 2016
Source: Wikipedia

Some 35 years ago, researchers were facing a herpesvirus dilemma. They had begun to see resistance to the most common antiviral at the time, acyclovir, and were hoping to find a new drug to keep the arsenals stocked. They came across a rather interesting chemical that seemed to work better than the original drug. It was originally known as DHPG - meaning (9-(1,3-dihydroxy-2-propoxymethyl)guanine - but was eventually named to the much easier-to-say ganciclovir.

 
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