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  • The First Stage Of The Hyperloop Contest Will Be In Texas

    The Hyperloop wars begin!

    Remember that Hyperloop Pod Racing competition we mentioned in June? Yeah, that's still happening. More >
  • What's the Deal With the Apollo Milkstool?

    What's the Deal With the Apollo Milkstool?

    The sight of a rocket standing tall on its launchpad ready to carry men to the Moon is an iconic and powerful image of the Apollo era. The sight of a rocket sitting on a stool on the same ... More >
  • A Drug Meant For Narcolepsy Can Boost Brain Function

    Is Modafinil really a 'smart pill'?

    In 1998, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the drug modafinil as a treatment for narcolepsy, a condition in which the brain has trouble regulating its sleep-wake cycle that results ... More >
  • Why NASA Helped Ridley Scott Create 'The Martian' Film

    Why NASA Helped Create 'The Martian'

    The day Ridley Scott called NASA was a great day for NASA. Scott, or Sir Ridley, or the dude who has directed several of the greatest sci-fi movies of all time, plus Thelma and Louise, ... More >
  • Tiny, Sophisticated Human Brain Grown In A Dish

    Tiny, Sophisticated Human Brain Grown In A Dish

    Researchers from Ohio State University have made the most sophisticated lab-grown brain yet, according to results presented yesterday at the 2015 Military Health System Research Symposium. It ... More >
Kelsey D. Atherton
at 09:23 AM Aug 28 2015
Kelsey D. Atherton
Drones // 

Judging by headlines flying around the internet, it'd be easy to think that North Dakota is a futuristic cyberpunk wild west, where deputized police robots shoot first and ask questions later. Stories like the Daily Beast's “First State Legalizes Taser Drones for Cops, Thanks to a Lobbyist,” the Verge's “Police in North Dakota can now use drones armed with tasers,” and Reason's “Watch Out for Drones with Pepper Spray in North Dakota” all allude to a dark, dismal world of legally-sanctioned robot assault. That's especially strange, because since 2012, any drone use in North Dakota has had to go through an ethics review board at the University of North Dakota.

Mary Beth Griggs
at 09:23 AM Aug 28 2015
Space // 

OMG NASA, SRSLY? The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (aka, NASA) has fittingly named their latest mission OMG, or Oceans Melting Greenland. It's a funny name for a very serious project mapping the seafloor around the 27,000 miles of Greenland's coastline. The researchers hope to document ice loss and predict future sea level rise with the data from a repurposed fishing boat and airplane flyovers. OMG, indeed.

Xavier Harding
at 09:23 AM Aug 28 2015
Apple
Mobile // 

Apple has confirmed the iPhone 6s announcement event for September 9 at 10am PST at San Francisco's Bill Graham Civic Auditorium. Although the company isn't saying what will be featured at the event, it has left several hints in the iPhone's voice assistant Siri. When you say to Siri "Give me a hint," the voice assistant replies with a cryptic message.

By John Coyle/Motor Authority
at 09:23 AM Aug 28 2015
Cars // 

Self-driving trucks from Pennsylvania firm Royal Truck and Equipment will be on Florida roads by the end of the year.

Xavier Harding
at 09:23 AM Aug 28 2015
Instagram
Gadgets // 

Instagram now supports portrait and landscape photos in its app. Meaning it's more than squares who can take part in the filter fun.

Alexandra Ossola
at 09:23 AM Aug 28 2015

Cannabis is one of the oldest domesticated plants, but we know surprisingly little about it. That's because, given marijuana's status as an illicit substance in most of the world, gaining permission to conduct research into its medicinal properties or genetic heritage has been notoriously difficult. Now a team of Canadian researchers has peered into the plant's genome to understand the different species that may account for marijuana's famous variations, and lend some insight into the plant's ancestry. The study was published yesterday in PLOS One.

Claire Maldarelli
at 09:23 AM Aug 28 2015
Pixabay

One of the pillars of scientific research--perhaps the one that makes science as definitive as it is--is that any study should be capable of being repeated under the same methods and conditions and if the research holds true, the same result will be found every time the experiment is performed--something known as a study's reproducibility.

Alexandra Ossola
at 09:23 AM Aug 28 2015
Gadgets // 

The internet is flooded with photos—of your brunch, of your cat, of your estranged elementary school friend's cousin's wedding. 1.8 billion photos are uploaded daily, and most of them are objectively pretty terrible. Now a team of computer scientists from Princeton University and software company Adobe have created a program to make those photos just a little better, by identifying and eliminating distracting elements, according to a paper presented recently at this year's Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition Conference in Boston.

Sarah Fecht
at 09:23 AM Aug 28 2015
NASA, ESA, and G. Bacon (STScI)

The brightest objects in the universe have massive black holes at their hearts.

Mary Beth Griggs
at 09:23 AM Aug 28 2015
Energy // 

Renewable energy generated by solar panels and wind turbines is great for humans, but not so awesome for flying creatures. There have been reports of solar farms vaporizing birds and wind turbines smashing bats who confuse the turbines for trees. US States are now required to start incorporating more clean energy (and low carbon) solutions into their power supply, but no one wants cleaner air to come at the expense of wildlife populations. So what's to be done?

Mary Beth Griggs
at 00:51 AM Aug 28 2015
Brian Metscher
Nature // 

Sure, it might look like the Tick, but the blue bug pictured above is more creepy-crawly than dramatic superhero. It's a new species of millipede, identified using a novel high-tech scanning technique and described today in a study in PLOS ONE.

Alexandra Ossola
at 00:51 AM Aug 28 2015
Fitness // 

Sugar is dietary enemy number one at the moment. The delicious compound can be found in many foods and beverages (even those that don't taste sweet) and has been blamed for the obesity epidemic in the U.S. and beyond. Now an Israeli startup, DouxMatok, has devised a way to deliver sugar so that your tongue tastes the same amount of sweetness, but you're ingesting only half the sugar, according to an article from Fast Company.

Kristen Hall-Geisler
at 00:51 AM Aug 28 2015
Bugatti Automobiles SAS
Gaming // 

Bugatti doesn't build cars for just anybody. Its most recent supercar, the Bugatti Veyron, was limited to a run of just 450 cars, and when they were gone, they were gone. Of course, with a $2 million-plus price tag, it did take a while for those 450 Veyrons to find homes.

Kelsey D. Atherton
at 00:51 AM Aug 28 2015
Oshkosh, used with permission

This side of a tank, there is no more iconic U.S. Army vehicle that the High Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicle (HMMVV), or as it's better known, the Humvee. Design on them started in the late 1970s, with the Jeep-like vehicles first delivered in the mid-1980s. Humvees invaded Iraq twice, carrying soldiers and marines rapidly over desert. A wide range of equipment configurations made the HMMVV at times a troop carrier, an ambulance, and anti-tank tool, and an artillery pack mule. As useful as the vehicle was fighting against Saddam Hussein's Iraqi military during the Iraq War, it suffered on counterinsurgency patrols, as its light weight left it vulnerable to powerful roadside bombs. Yesterday, the Army announced the contract for the Joint Light Tactical Vehicle program: Oshkosh's Light Combat Tactical All-Terrain Vehicle, or L-ATV.

Alexandra Ossola
at 00:51 AM Aug 28 2015

The colonies of bacteria living in our throats could indicate whether or not a person has schizophrenia, according to a study published yesterday in the journal Peer J.

 
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