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  • Cooking With Lava

    Lava Cooking

    British art and design duo Bompas and Parr love crazy cooking projects and lava seemed like the ideal way to give their steak a unique flavour. Teaming up with Professor Robert Wysocki from ... More >
  • Welcome To Mars. Here's Where You'll Be Staying

    Welcome To Mars. Here's Where You'll Be Staying

    NASA has plans to put humans on Mars in the 2030s or 2040s, and the private company Mars One is already interviewing applicants for its one-way trip to the Red Planet. But a couple of crucial ... More >
  • Japan's Military Will Patrol Earth's Orbitals

    Japan's Military Will Patrol Earth's Orbitals

    Japan's military plans to take defense to the heavens in 2019. According to a report by Japan's Kyodo News Agency, Japan's Self-Defense Forces plan to add a space monitoring branch, to be ... More >
  • New Mars Rover Will Have Lasers, X-Ray Vision, And More

    New Mars Rover Does Cool Tricks

    The Curiosity rover (or Mars Science Laboratory, as NASA wonks call it) has been an immensely successful mission so far. But now NASA is planning the next mission to Mars, and today the agency ... More >
  • Milky Way Has The Mass Of 800 Billion Suns, Study Finds

    How Much Does The Milky Way?

    Astronomers have performed yet another checkup on our home galaxy, this time asking it to step on a scale. The Milky Way has a mass equal to 800 billion suns, according to the team of ... More >
Popular Science Staff
at 07:02 AM Aug 22 2014
The Verge/NASA

While the Mars rovers’ drivers sit in relative comfort here on Earth, the rovers themselves do get beat up a bit. In honor of Curiosity’s second anniversary on Mars, The Verge put together a cool story showing the before and after pics of the toll the harsh environment has exacted on the rover. Scroll through for yourself to see some of the dents, scratches and holes that Curiosity has accumulated over the years. Oh, and all the dust it picked up. There’s a lot of dust. 

Kelsey D. Atherton
at 07:02 AM Aug 22 2014
The0JJ/imgur.com

Over the hills, across the stone bridge, past the giant pony, around the lake of questionable test, and beyond the giant rainbow barrier sits a work of great artifice on a grey plain. Far larger than any single inhabitant of this virtual world, the contraption is a complete, working computer, run entirely within the rules and universe of Minecraft. The hard drive stores up to 4 kilobytes of data, and it is covered in torches to keep zombies from attacking it at night.

Francie Diep
at 07:02 AM Aug 22 2014
Nebraska Early Development Network
Science // 

The U.S. National Center for Health Statistics released today its latest report on American teenagers having babies. The results are both happy and strange. American teens are having babies at their lowest rate ever -- and that rate is falling fast. Yet, as Vox discovered, nobody knows why this is happening. One of the steadiest trends in American life is inexplicable.

Sarah Fecht
at 07:01 AM Aug 22 2014
Popular Science/NASA/Nickelodeon

Cosmonauts have apparently discovered plankton and other microorganisms on the outside of the International Space Station’s windows, according to an announcement from a Russian official.  NASA has not yet confirmed or denied the findings. 

Francie Diep
at 07:01 AM Aug 22 2014
Reed Scherer, National Science Foundation
Nature // 

Over the past week, scientists have published the results of studies analyzing two very strange -- and very different -- lakes. One is Pitch Lake, a lake made of asphalt and filled with hydrocarbon gases on the Caribbean island of Trinidad. The other is Lake Whillans, a freshwater body located 800 meters under the surface of a glacier in West Antarctica. You might say the lakes seem unearthly, although they're located right on our home planet. Titan, Saturn's moon, has hydrocarbon lakes like Pitch Lake, and several moons in our solar system are thought to host liquid water underneath a thick layer of ice.

Neel V. Patel
at 07:01 AM Aug 22 2014
Erik Jepsen/UC San Diego Publications
Hacks // 

As it turns out, the scanners are actually pretty easy to fool.

Kelsey D. Atherton
at 07:01 AM Aug 22 2014
Screenshot of video by John Kristensen, YouTube

Fortunately for everyone who isn't a fighter pilot, John Kristensen, a Danish Air Force pilot who flew missions in Afghanistan between 2002 and 2003, brought along his GoPro for a flight in an F-16 Fighting Falcon over Greenland. The resulting video is stunning, as he races past icebergs, glaciers, ice floes, snow-covered plains, and fjords. There's a lot that's frozen on the Greenland ice sheet, it turns out. He also flies in formation with other pilots from Fighter Wing Skrydstrup

Lindsay Handmer
at 10:59 AM Aug 21 2014
ESA/NASA
Space // 

With its re-supply mission to the International Space Station complete, the Cygnus Orbital-2 spacecraft Janice Voss burns up as it re-enters Earth's atmosphere. Fortunately for us German Astronaut Alexander Gerst managed to snap this amazing picture of the resulting fireball.

Francie Diep
at 09:31 AM Aug 21 2014
Image by Shaddad, accessed via NASA
Space // 

The objects that dominated the Solar System early in its history may have been small…but they didn't lack flair. A new study has found that at least one early Solar System object -- likely hundreds of kilometers or smaller in diameter -- hosted volcanic activity.

Emily Gertz
at 09:31 AM Aug 21 2014
elizaIO on Flickr
Hacks // 

Used car batteries can leech chemicals and create lead pollution when they're incorrectly trashed. A team at MIT believes that this lead can be cut out of the waste stream entirely -- and put to good use creating emissions-free energy.

Loren Grush
at 09:30 AM Aug 21 2014
NASA
Space // 

On August 14, researchers from University California, Berkeley, announced an amazing discovery from NASA’s Stardust probe: During its deep space voyage, the ship had captured seven tiny pieces of interstellar rocks, making them the first confirmed samples of intact dust from beyond the Solar System.

Sarah Fecht
at 09:30 AM Aug 21 2014
Paul Clement via Flickr By CC 2.0
Nature // 

Now Iceland is warning airlines that another volcano named Bárðarbunga may be about to blow. On Monday scientists registered the area’s largest earthquake since 1996, and they’ve spotted magma welling beneath the ground, causing Iceland’s Met office to issue a code orange risk level to the aviation industry, Reuters reports. On the scale, which comes from the International Civil Aviation Organization, the only thing riskier than orange is red. Now, the Iceland Review reports that areas north of the volcano are being evacuated. 

Francie Diep
at 09:30 AM Aug 21 2014
Warren Rachele (Wrachele) via Flickr

It's a chemical compound so new, it doesn't have a name.* In a paper, its creators call it either V116517 or Compound 37. (Like Chanel's No. 5 perfume! Except a drug.)

Kelsey D. Atherton
at 09:30 AM Aug 21 2014
Popular Science

One hundred years ago, the Panama Canal opened for the first time. A triumph of turn-of-the-century engineering, it connected Pacific and Atlantic, expanding the worlds of maritime commerce and re-writing the sea lanes of the Western Hemisphere.

Loren Grush
at 09:30 AM Aug 21 2014

This camouflage trick is a trait shared by all cephalopods – squids and cuttlefish included -- but now humans are getting in on the color-changing action too.

 
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