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  • The Ozone Layer Is On The Mend

    The Ozone Layer Is On The Mend

    An international agreement to phase out use of chemicals that damage the ozone layer appears to be working. A new report finds that ozone-depleting substances in the atmosphere are down by 10 to ... More >
  • Lasers Reveal Underground 'Super Henge'

    Lasers Reveal Underground 'Super Henge'

    Near the prehistoric Stonehenge monument, archeologists have found the buried traces of a "super henge" more than 4,900 feet in circumference. That's about as big around as the Astrodome and ... More >
  • Rosetta Takes A Selfie

    Rosetta Takes A Selfie

    The Rosetta robotic space probe has sent back this amazing photo of itself, illuminated in the sun's light. More >
  • A Google Glass App That Detects People's Emotions

    An App to Detect Emotions?

    Sometimes people are hard to read. Why not leave all that work to a computer? Perhaps you could use this experimental app that works in Google Glass. Aim Glass's camera at a person's face and ... More >
  • Home Built Elysium Style Exoskeleton Makes Lifting Concrete Barbells Easy

    A DIY Exoskeleton

    YouTuber the Hacksmith has built himself a set of Elysium style robot arms. Powered by compressed air, the system lets him easily curl a 77 KG barbell made from steel and concrete blocks. More >
Lindsay Handmer
at 10:06 AM Sep 18 2014
E/V Nautilius
Nature // 

Looking more like a made up animal than something from real life, the creature in question is a Siphonophore. In the order of Hydrozoa, it's actually a colony composed of many individual animals.

Rafi Letzter
at 09:55 AM Sep 18 2014
ESA/Rosetta/NAVCAM
Space // 

Here's a refresher from middle school science class: An asteroid is a huge rock tumbling through the solar system, and that's pretty much all it looks like--a big rock. Meanwhile, a comet is a ball of ice and dust that has a long bright tail, which is caused by the Sun blasting that ice and dust off of the comet's surface as it zooms around.

Emily Gertz
at 09:55 AM Sep 18 2014
Courtesy of Little Black Spot on the Sun Today via Flickr.com
Science // 

Oh Texas. All that juicy low-carbon windpower you're generating – and wiring into the grid – makes us love you.

Emily Gertz
at 09:55 AM Sep 18 2014
Hybrid Medical Animation/Photo Researchers
Science // 

23andMe, a service offering personal DNA testing, announced over the weekend that it is canceling a planned change to its online privacy settings, according to Vox.

Rafi Letzter
at 09:55 AM Sep 18 2014
Zouavman Le Zouave via Wikimedia Commons

Here's why it's so hard: Atoms can easily form solids, liquids, and gasses, because when they come into contact they push and pull on each other. That push and pull forms the underlying structure of all matter. Light particles, or photons, do not typically interact with one another, according to Dr. Andrew Houck, a professor of electrical engineering at Princeton and an author on the study. The trick of this research was forcing them to do just that.

Sarah Fecht
at 09:55 AM Sep 18 2014
Norman Kuring/NASA
Nature // 

A paper in Nature Communications reports that a phytoplankton named Noctiluca scintillans has invaded a dead-zone off the coast of India, where it's threatening to disrupt natural foodchains as well as the local fishing industry.

Francie Diep
at 09:55 AM Sep 18 2014
Shalm/NIST

As if it weren't hard enough already to imagine it in twos, physicists have entangled three photons with each other. Entanglement is a counterintuitive quantum physics phenomenon, in which a particle influences all the others with which it's entangled -- even if the particles are far apart. If one particle is in one state, for example, the others might be in the same state. In this case, however, each photon, which is a particle of light, had the same polarization -- either horizontal or vertical.

Francie Diep
at 09:55 AM Sep 18 2014
Zooniverse Penguin Watch
Nature // 

Check out this latest citizen-science project. It's a site where you can look at photos gathered by an Antarctic network of wildlife cameras and mark if there are penguins in the photos. In other weo you get to look at cute animals online and help environmental science! Sounds like a win-win to me.

Kelsey D. Atherton
at 09:55 AM Sep 18 2014
Air Force Research Laboratory

In World War II, mighty bombers came equipped with gun barrels, manned by gunners at the ready to protect the plane from attacking fighters. The B-52 Stratofortress even came with a tail gun for self defense and last used it in combat over Vietnam in 1972. The change in fighter weapons from guns to missiles made tail guns obsolete, but now Lockheed and DARPA are bringing them back. As freakin’ lasers.

Rafi Letzter
at 09:55 AM Sep 18 2014
Rafi Letzter

When medical research focuses on white people, things get missed, and people die.

Andrew Rosenblum
at 09:55 AM Sep 18 2014
Wikimedia Commons
Gadgets // 

Continuing a sort of cross-country tour to detect phony cell towers, also known as interceptors or IMSI catchers, researchers associated with the security firm ESD America have detected 15 of the covert devices in Washington D.C., plus three more in nearby Virginia.

Lindsay Handmer
at 10:51 AM Sep 17 2014
MacArtney Underwater Technology
Tech // 

Floating turbines and other offshore renewable energy generators can produce a lot of power, but face issues getting that electricity back to shore. The MacArtney 11kV Wet Mate Connector makes connecting and disconnecting cabling simple with what is literally just a really really big plug and socket.

Rafi Letzter
at 09:42 AM Sep 17 2014
Carolco Pictures and Michael Dickey
Tech // 

A team of researchers report that they understand a property of a liquid metal that allows them to manipulate it like the T-1000 from Terminator 2 and even build "scale models" of the violent automaton.

Kelsey D. Atherton
at 09:42 AM Sep 17 2014
Drones // 

Drones soon may be bound together by a common code. Airware, a commercial drone software company with MIT roots, hopes to unify drones in a shared code architecture. Airware already makes an autopilot, but that’s just the first step to creating a drone operating system, allowing hardware from different manufacturers to communicate with one another.

Francie Diep
at 09:42 AM Sep 17 2014
Screenshot from "CSAIL Robotic Arm Slithers Like A Snake Through Pipes" by MITCSAIL on YouTube
Robots // 

So Gizmodo found this morning a seafoam-green, pneumatic, snake/tentacle robot that's able to wiggle its way through a simple, walled maze. Let's take a look:

 
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