Oops! Something went wrong. Please scroll down to find your content.
  • Wyoming is basically trying to outlaw clean energy

    Wyoming is basically trying to outlaw clean energy

    It's often said that in New Zealand, there are more sheep than people. In Wyoming, there's way more energy than people. More >
  • James Bond has been teaching kids to smoke for over half a century

    Does James Bond Teach Kids to Smoke?

    Over the course of six decades, James Bond dodged thousands of enemy bullets, averted global wars and deactivated some potent bombs. But he may have also encouraged kids to try smoking cigarettes. More >
  • These 5 finalists will race to the moon in Google's Lunar XPrize competition

    And Now, The Lunar X Prize

    This team from Israel was the first to book its ticket to the moon. Instead of rolling like a rover, this dishwasher-sized spacecraft will "hop" using retro-thrusters to move 500 meters across the ... More >
  • Using Tech to... Talk to Toddlers?

    Using Tech to... Talk to Toddlers?

    In a classroom at a transitional housing program in San Mateo, California, Brianna is talking about her 2-year-old daughter, Hope. She's having trouble getting Hope to talk to her—but the ... More >
  • This is What it Could Look Like to Land on Pluto

    This is What it Could Look Like to Land on Pluto

    After a 10-year journey, NASA's New Horizons spacecraft sped past Pluto for just a few short hours in July 2015. It was going far too fast to enter an orbit around the dwarf planet—let alone ... More >
Mark D. Kaufman
at 09:54 AM Jan 25 2017
Don Davis, Southwest Research Institute
Space // 

The history of our solar system is a history of collisions. Massive, world-shattering collisions. Evidence of these collisions rains down on us every day in the form of meteorites—rocks hurled into space when massive asteroids crash into each other. For the first time, researchers have examined some of the rocky relics of a particularly colossal crash that occurred 466 million years ago. The results, published in Nature Astronomy, show that some of the rarest meteorites of the modern world were once commonplace, making up more than a third of the total space debris.

Eleanor Cummins
at 09:54 AM Jan 25 2017
Specific Love Creations
Make // 

Did you plan on getting lost in the middle of the woods, where no one could hear your calls for help? Of course you didn't.

Kelsey D. Atherton
at 09:54 AM Jan 25 2017
National Highway Traffic Safety Administration
Cars // 

“The Automatic Emergency Braking (AEB) or Autopilot systems may not function as designed, increasing the risk of a crash.” It's a simple sentence, delivered with the calm finality of bureaucratic certainty. It is a literal post-mortem, the bottom-line-up-front from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration's investigation into the first fatal crash of an autonomous car—one made by Tesla Motors. The investigation into the crash closed today, and it will likely cast a long shadow over the future of self-driving cars, which have long been heralded as potentially life-saving devices.

Eleanor Cummins
at 09:54 AM Jan 25 2017
MTA
Science // 

New York City's transportation problems are being vacuumed away. Or at least, the Metro Transit Authority hopes they are.

Sarah Fecht
at 09:54 AM Jan 25 2017
NASA / Southwest Research Institute / Alex Parker

After a 10-year journey, NASA's New Horizons spacecraft sped past Pluto for just a few short hours in July 2015. It was going far too fast to enter an orbit around the dwarf planet—let alone land on it—but along the way it grabbed some pretty amazing photos of this mysterious world.

Katharine Gammon
at 09:54 AM Jan 25 2017
Josh Willink

In a classroom at a transitional housing program in San Mateo, California, Brianna is talking about her 2-year-old daughter, Hope. She's having trouble getting Hope to talk to her—but the toddler is perfectly happy to converse with the television while she watches Little Einstein.

Jeffrey Lin and P.W. Singer
at 09:54 AM Jan 25 2017
=GT via China Defense Forum

This picture of a landing gear assembly on a lab test rig shows how big it is; the foot pad's diameter is easily 2.5-3 feet.

Kelsey D. Atherton
at 09:44 AM Jan 25 2017
Screenshot by author, from YouTube
Tech // 

A burning car on a bridge is two kinds of traffic problems: it's a danger for everyone around it, and it's an obstacle for traffic trying to get around it and out of the way. The combination can slow a fire truck driving to extinguish the burn. To solve this problem, Dubai in the United Arab Emirates reached into the future. How do you stop a car burning on a bridge? Send a fireman on a jet ski through the water, and then have them fly on a jetpack so they can tackle the flame.

Mary Beth Griggs
at 09:44 AM Jan 25 2017
NOAA/NASA
Space // 

We've got a whole new view of our planet. The GOES-16 satellite, launched on November 19, sent back its first pictures of the Earth this week. The satellite—a joint project between NOAA and NASA—is designed to observe conditions here on Earth, capturing images of our planet in an unprecedented 16 channels of light. The different wavelengths will let scientists monitor atmospheric conditions on the planet, helping to improve NOAA's forecasts. It's a big jump forward from previous iterations of the geostationary GOES satellites, which regularly send back images and data of conditions on Earth.

Kendra Pierre-Louis
at 09:44 AM Jan 25 2017
Pexels
Science // 

In the summer of 2015 a tropical storm slammed into the mountains of Myanmar and triggered one of the largest landslides not caused by an earthquake in a decade. We know this because of pictures—stunning in their devastation—taken with a satellite run by NASA. We know this because of government science.

Mary Beth Griggs
at 09:44 AM Jan 25 2017
Jose C. E. Mendoza
Nature // 

There's a new crab in town, and it's no muggle. A paper published Monday in ZooKeys described the recently identified crab Harryplax severus, named after two Harry Potter characters.

Sarah Fecht
at 09:44 AM Jan 25 2017
Heptner and Sludskiy 1972
Nature // 

Caspian tigers once roamed all over Central Asia, ranging from modern day Turkey to northwestern China. The huge cats stalked through tall reeds and shrubbery, hunting boar and deer. But in the first half of the 1900s, hunting and poisoning decimated the subspecies, and the Soviet Union's agriculture projects drained the tiger's swampy terrain to grow cotton and other crops. Disappearing habitats and food sources had wiped the Caspian tiger off the map by the 1950s.

Jeffrey Lin and P.W. Singer
at 09:44 AM Jan 25 2017
Xinhua News Agency
Space // 

A Chinese space launch company, Landspace, has won the first Chinese private space launch contract from a foreign company.

Sarah Fecht
at 09:44 AM Jan 25 2017
Courtesty SpaceIL

This team from Israel was the first to book its ticket to the moon. Instead of rolling like a rover, this dishwasher-sized spacecraft will "hop" using retro-thrusters to move 500 meters across the lunar surface. SpaceIL has commissioned a ride with Spaceflight Industries.

Kate Baggaley
at 09:02 AM Jan 18 2017
John B. Carnett
Science // 

A gentle pulse of electricity can make bacteria dance (or rather, swim) to scientists' tune. Researchers reported on Tuesday in Nature Communications that electricity can flip certain genes in Escherichia coli cells on or off, making the microbes wave their limb-like flagella or relay info to their neighbors on command.

 
1 2 3 4 5 ... 645
Sign up for the Pop Sci newsletter
Australian Popular Science
ON SALE 03 NOVEMBER
PopSci Live