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  • The Moon May Be The Result Of Earth's Collision With Its Long-Lost Twin

    Did Earth Collide with a Long Lost Twin?

    Our beloved Moon, often the staple of a peaceful and tranquil nighttime scene, has a pretty violent origin story. In 1970, researchers proposed the “giant impact” hypothesis, which ... More >
  • Shark Attacks Are So Unlikely, But So Fascinating

    Shark Attacks Are So Unlikely, But So Fascinating

    Sharks are incredibly unlikely to bite you. They're even less likely to kill you. However, we remain fascinated with their ability--and occasional proclivity--to do just that. With so many things ... More >
  • Navy's Long-Awaited Drone Moves Closer To Reality

    Don't Let This TERN Poop On You

    DARPA's latest drone program just took a turn for the better. The Tactically Exploited Reconnaissance Node (TERN) is designed as a Medium Altitude Long Endurance (MALE) flyer for the US Navy. Like ... More >
  • Warming Climate Could Change How Food Tastes

    Warming Climate Could Change How Food Tastes

    There might be some very tangible, selfish reasons for foodies to care about climate change. It turns out that warming temperatures could not only impact our food supply, but they might also ... More >
  • Did The Future Begin In 1610?

    Did The Future Begin In 1610?

    Time is a valuable commodity for humans. We like our news up to the minute and our technology up-to-date. But when it comes to some temporal boundaries scientists are still trying to figure out ... More >
Chandra Clarke
at 10:31 AM Apr 28 2015
Photo Credit: Shyamal via Wikimedia Commons

At first glance, it might seem like an odd grouping: ants, space, and high school students. But Stanford University biologist Deborah M. Gordon is hoping that the combination will produce results that will help save lives.

Jeffrey Lin and P.W. Singer
at 10:31 AM Apr 28 2015
pinterest

The first 052D destroyer, the 7,500 ton Kunming, was launched in late 2013 and commissioned in March 2014 (its hull number, 172, was not painted on then).

Loren Grush
at 10:31 AM Apr 28 2015
NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Carnegie Institution of Washington
Space // 

NASA's MESSENGER spacecraft has been enjoying the past four years zipping around the planet Mercury. Launched in 2004, the probe traveled for six and a half years to reach the closest rock to the Sun, inserting itself into orbit around the planet in March 2011. During its time in rotation, the probe has collected valuable data about this little world, including information that indicates ice and other crazy materials in the planet's polar regions.

Dan Moren
at 10:31 AM Apr 28 2015
Courtesy TMT International Observatory
Hacks // 

It appears the stars have not yet aligned for the Thirty Meter Telescope project, which saw its main website targeted by an alleged cyberattack this weekend. The site was unavailable for several hours, a project spokesperson confirmed, and a group known as Operation Green Rights--associated with the popular Anonymous movement--has claimed responsibility.

Alexandra Ossola
at 10:31 AM Apr 28 2015
Nature // 

For the past 30 years, Nikon has held a contest for the year's best microphotography images, and competition has been fierce. In 2011, they brought those still images to life, creating a separate category for videos, called the Nikon Small World In Motion competition.

Alexandra Ossola
at 10:30 AM Apr 28 2015

In 2001, a doctor in New York completed what may seem like a routine surgery to remove a patient's gallbladder. But in fact that procedure wasn't routine at all, because the patient was in France. That was the first successful long-distance robotic surgery, or telesurgery, ever performed, and since then the field has taken off. Though robotic surgery is not yet the industry standard, sales of medical robots are increasing by 20 percent each year, and by 2025 the Department of Defense wants to have deployable Trauma Pods that could allow surgeons to operate on soldiers from hundreds or thousands of miles away.

Dan Moren
at 10:30 AM Apr 28 2015

Virtual reality has typically focused on matters of sight and sound, but increasingly people are investigating a way to make those experiences tactile as well. A team of student engineers at Rice University has developed a clever pair of VR gloves that make it feel like you're actually interacting with virtual objects.

Mary Beth Griggs
at 10:30 AM Apr 28 2015
Science // 

People have brewed beer for thousands of years, but there are some things that brewers still don't have down to a science. Despite the best efforts of brewers everywhere, sometimes a tiny, nefarious bacterium will manage to squirm its way into a batch of beer, ruining it for everyone.

Kelsey D. Atherton
at 09:37 AM Apr 27 2015
U.S. Naval Research Laboratory/Jamie Hartman

It's a transparent armor so good it might turn the phrase “glass cannon” on its head. The Naval Research Laboratory developed a manufacturing process to reliably make a strong, transparent ceramic that also allows infrared cameras to look through it, which most commercial glass can't do. Now that the process is complete, the NRL is sharing the technology with industry so they can scale it up to make giant sheets of transparent, lightweight, bulletproof clay.

Mary Beth Griggs
at 09:36 AM Apr 27 2015
USGS

Just days after Oklahoma's government embraced the idea that human actions could, in fact, cause earthquakes, the United States Geological Survey (USGS) released a report outlining how they could potentially map people-induced earthquake hazards.

Jeffrey Lin and P.W. Singer
at 09:36 AM Apr 27 2015
Air Power Australia

China and Russia, as part of closer strategic ties, have finalized a long-awaited deal for very long range S-400 surface to air missile (SAM) system. The deal is not only the largest Sino-Russian arms deal in over a decade, but S-400 missile defense capabilities would provide China with a quick missile defense upgrade at the moment neighboring states like North Korea acquire more ballistic missiles, and the U.S. and Japan look to buy stealthy anti-ship missiles.

Kelsey D. Atherton
at 09:36 AM Apr 27 2015
Animal Planet, used with permission
Drones // 

The normal human response to reports of a deadly shark in the water is to boil the sea, move inland, and spend the rest of one's life in peaceful isolation at the top of a remote desert mountain. (Okay, perhaps that's just me). For Animal Planet's River Monsters show, Jeremy Wade instead goes into the ocean to look for salmon sharks.

Alexandra Ossola
at 09:36 AM Apr 27 2015
CDC

In 2013, almost 600,000 people died of malaria, a disease caused by a parasite passed to humans through mosquito bites. But these deaths--mostly among children in Africa--are preventable. For years researchers have been working on different tactics to reduce malaria's prevalence, such as creating innovative drugs or highly effective repellants as well as engineering the mosquitoes themselves to prevent the disease from spreading. After four years of tests on thousands of infants and children, an anti-malarial vaccine has emerged as one of the most promising candidates to prevent the spread of the disease. The results of the clinical trial are published this week in The Lancet.

Alexandra Ossola
at 09:36 AM Apr 27 2015
Science // 

People find all sorts of inventive ways to continue the legacy of their recently deceased relatives. Some start charity funds; others hang on to photographs or old keepsakes. But as Katia Apalategui, a 52-year-old French insurance saleswoman, mourned the death of her father seven years ago, she was inspired to try to capture his scent in a perfume. She teamed up with researchers from the Université du Havre, who have also been working on distilling the human scent.

Kelsey D. Atherton
at 09:36 AM Apr 27 2015
Jason Roadman, NREL
Energy // 

Falcons are perfected aerial machines, evolved over millennia to be very, very good at being falcons. Unfortunately, upstart Homo sapiens have put a few obstacles in the path of these raptors, like intruding quadcopters or deadly wind turbines. What's the best way to still capture all the renewable energy from the wind while leaving the creatures of the air alive and unharmed? Recruit a falcon as a guide and strap a GPS on his back, according to the National Renewable Energy Laboratory.

 
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