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  • MIT Students Claim Astronauts Will Starve On 'Mars One' Mission

    Mars One Colonists Could Starve

    The students, part of a research group specializing in large-scale multi-billion dollar space programs, used publically available information about the Mars One mission plans to simulate ... More >
  • From The Archives: How The $10 Million Ansari X Prize Was Won

    The New Right Stuff

    Ten years ago this week, commercial spaceflight took off when a private spaceflight company won the Ansari X Prize: a space competition that was offering a $10 million reward to any ... More >
  • How An Evangelical Christian Researcher Reconciles Science With Her Faith

    The Christian Scientist

    Editor's note: Our profile of Bill Nye [September 2014] elicited an impassioned response from readers. We received more than 100 letters, many from readers grappling with how to reconcile ... More >
  • In Africa, Ebola Patients Need More Than Medicine

    Ebola Patients Need More Than Medicine

    The dusty hills around Lima sprout concrete at all angles. There are many words here for the gray delineation of poverty-struck areas: áreas tugurizadas (slum zones), the less formal tugurios ... More >
  • Space Combat Won't Look At All Like 'Star Wars'

    Space Combat Won't Look At All Like 'Star Wars'

    If humanity brings war into space, what will those battles look like? Well, if our understanding of physics is anything close to correct, they won’t look at all like Star Wars. In this six ... More >
Kelsey D. Atherton
at 09:17 AM Oct 22 2014
Hacks // 

In the documentary film "Citizenfour" by Laura Poitras, it’s revealed that Edward Snowden’s longtime girlfriend Lindsay Mills also left the United States and joined Snowden in Russia. Cheekily, Vogue suggests a trio of outfits for Mills, to match both the climate and the need for discretion that comes with proximity to the source of a major intelligence leak.

Mary Beth Griggs
at 09:17 AM Oct 22 2014
tiegeltuf via Flickr

After crossing multiple time zones it can feel like your entire body is worn out. And it turns out, that’s true, even down to the bacteria in your gut. In a study published last week in the journal Cell, researchers found that in both humans and mice, the gut microbiome was affected by changes to the test subjects' biological clocks. The human subjects went on a trip from the U.S. to Israel -- an eight- to ten-hour time zone difference. The mice in the study didn't get to go anywhere (humans have all the fun), but they had their feeding habits and the light in their habitats disrupted. In both the humans and the mice, the researchers took fecal samples before and after to see which bacteria were thriving in their guts. Not only did they find that the bacteria in the gut changed, they found that the bacteria who thrived under the changing conditions were the ones most associated with obesity and other health issues.  

Kelsey D. Atherton
at 09:17 AM Oct 22 2014
Screenshot, "3D Printed Guns First in the world 3D Zig Zag Revolver Made in Japan"
Hacks // 

When the first working gun was 3-D printed in the United States, the government responded not through the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms, but instead through the State Department. Guns, it turns out, aren’t terribly hard to get in the United States, so a 3-D printed gun doesn’t radically change gun access here. In countries with stricter gun control laws, though, printing a gun is a new risk. This week, Japan sentenced 28-year-old Yoshitomo Imura to two years in prison for printing guns and instructing others on how to print them.  

Mary Beth Griggs
at 09:17 AM Oct 22 2014
Nicholls Spinal Injury Foundation (nsif)

The treatment, developed by researchers in the UK and Poland, involved removing one of Fidyka's olfactory bulbs (the structures in the brain that allow you to smell) growing cells from the bulb, and then injecting those cells into the damaged area of Fidyka's spinal cord. The researchers were interested in cells from the olfactory bulb in particular because the nerves in the olfactory system are the only part of the human nervous system known to regrow after being damaged, with the help of olfactory ensheathing cells

Loren Grush
at 09:16 AM Oct 22 2014
Flickr

Now a group of scientists are decoding the mystery surrounding this bizarre disorder. By mapping the genome of each individual in the Pakistan family, researchers from Uppsala University in Sweden identified a single genetic mutation responsible for the condition. Known as ITPR2, the gene is responsible for controlling sweat production, and knocking it out can stop sweat secretion altogether.

Mary Beth Griggs
at 09:16 AM Oct 22 2014
Ryosuke Yagi via Flickr
Fitness // 

Of sports played on ice, hockey tends to get the most attention when it comes to injuries. But figure skaters are also pretty injury-prone, and because of the aesthetic nature of their sport, most figure skaters eschew pads and protective gear while on the ice. This means avoiding injuries can be difficult for practitioners of the sport, in which skaters can exert forces of more than six times their body weight during a jump.  

Dan Moren
at 09:43 AM Oct 21 2014

New York City is the city that never sleeps, and if a new study from the University of Southern California’s Viterbi School of Engineering is any indication, it’s home to plenty of active Internet connections around the clock. But there are plenty of places around the globe where the Internet actually does sleep at night.

Edward Wright
at 09:43 AM Oct 21 2014
Katadikazo, CC BY-NC

The World Health Organization has declared Nigeria to be free of the Ebola virus, after six weeks with no new cases being detected.

Cliff Ransom
at 09:43 AM Oct 21 2014
Marius Bugge
Science // 

About a year ago, Popular Science introduced a robot into the office (the fancy Park Ave New York office, that is - Australian Ed). One of the many virtues of working at a magazine such as ours is that we’re free to test all sorts of cool stuff. So we called the guys at Suitable Technologies and asked them to send us a BeamPro, the telepresence robot made famous by Edward Snowden (no doubt, he got the idea from us).

Loren Grush
at 09:43 AM Oct 21 2014
Tech // 

Humans love their LEDs. So much so, they’re winning Nobel Prizes in physics. Given their electrical efficiency and long lifespan, these remarkable light-emitting diodes are being used more and more as primary light sources, and experts argue they could help reduce the world’s overall electricity and material consumption for lighting.

Sarah Fecht
at 09:43 AM Oct 21 2014
Neil Milne via Flickr CC By SA-2.0

In a paper in Physical Biology, scientists have published the first mathematical model of how human nails grow. The researchers have found that nail health is a delicate balance between the adhesive forces that hold the nail securely in the finger, versus the nail’s movement as it slides forever forward toward the fingertip. Other factors, like thickness, biomechanical stress, and the way you trim your nails can influence whether you develop nail problems.

Mary Beth Griggs
at 09:56 AM Oct 18 2014
Rubén Díaz

Scared of needles? You aren’t alone. According to some estimates, as many as 1 in every 10 people are frightened of needles, and experts fear that the fear of pain may deter people from getting important injections at the doctor’s office. 

Loren Grush
at 09:55 AM Oct 18 2014
NASA

It’s easy to forget that the International Space Station isn’t just a place for astronauts to hang out and take epic selfies. Because of its unique microgravity environment, the station is actually a valuable hub for research and development, housing hundreds of ongoing experiments that involve everything from human tissue growth to protein crystal formation. Except there’s one little snag when it comes to conducting experiments on the ISS: It’s kind of far away. Getting critical samples from the station to Earth can be a lengthy process, and researchers usually have to wait anywhere from six months to a year before samples can make the trip to laboratories on the ground. These long waits can be risky, as live biological samples have a perishable lifespan and often need to be reviewed quickly before they degrade.

Mary Beth Griggs
at 09:55 AM Oct 18 2014
UC Berkeley
Science // 

The magnetic poles of the earth have switched back and forth many, many times during the 4.54 billion years that the Earth has been around. Previous research suggested that the process of reversing the poles took place over a long time period, potentially over a few thousand years. But new research shows that the reversal could actually happen much faster than that, with the magnetic North Pole migrating to the South Pole in a time span as short as a century. 

Alissa Zhu
at 09:55 AM Oct 18 2014
Rubén Díaz
Science // 

10: Percent of people who are frightened of needles. They could benefit from a new technology which may make injections pain-free.

 
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