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  • Why the Soviet space shuttle was left to rot

    Why the Soviet space shuttle was left to rot

    Just before dawn on the morning of November 15, 1988, the Energiya rocket stood fueled and ready on the launch pad at Baikonur, the Soviet Union's launch site. Mated to the booster was the Buran ... More >
  • The Looming 8th Pandemic – Climate Change and Cholera

    The Looming 8th Pandemic

    Throughout history, only a few pathogens have made historical impacts on human health. One of these is cholera. Caused by the bacterium Vibrio cholerae this potentially fatal disease has ... More >
  • First Ever Glass Deposits Found On Martian Surface

    First Ever Glass Deposits Found On Martian Surface

    It seems like Mars has just about everything:auroras, water, and now... glass? More >
  • Apple Set To Take On Spotify With New Music Streaming Service

    Apple Set To Take On Spotify

    Apple just made itself relevant to music lovers—again. At its annual World Wide Developer Conference (WWDC) on Monday, the company announced a new streaming music service for the iPhone, ... More >
  • One-Armed Robot Beats Samurai In Sword Competition

    One-Armed Robot Beats Samurai

    For thousands of years, nothing on Earth was deadlier with a sword than a human. People have since largely moved on from slicing weapons to firearms and explosives, but the art of swordsmanship ... More >
Amy Shira Teitel
at 11:09 AM Jul 8 2015
Space // 

From the moment NASA introduced its seven Mercury astronauts to the nation at a press conference on April 9, 1959, the manned program dominated more than a decade of the space agency's activities. The astronauts graced magazine covers and became national heroes as the enraptured (and sometimes cynical) public waited to see if Apollo would successfully land on the Moon by the end of the decade. But behind this highly publicized space race was a program to begin visiting our planetary neighbours, Venus and Mars, which gave rise to the Mariner Mars exploration program.

Jason Tetro
at 11:09 AM Jul 8 2015
Source: Wikipedia; Modifications: Jason Tetro

Up until recently, anyone suffering from high cholesterol had a fairly easy option to improve health. All they needed was a prescription for a group of chemicals known as statins. For decades, this was the go-to drug to cost-effectively keep low density lipoprotein (LDL) levels in check and prevent the onset of cardiovascular disease. Although this view has changed somewhat with the FDA providing advice on the potential risks associated with their use, the number of people taking these drugs continues to be high.

Sarah Fecht
at 11:09 AM Jul 8 2015
Hubble Heritage Team (STScI / AURA), Y. Chu (UIUC) et al., NASA

It's never too early to start planning ahead. Hubble is nearing the end of its lifespan, and the James Webb Space Telescope is just gearing up to take its place in 2018. But what comes after that?

Kelsey D. Atherton
at 11:08 AM Jul 8 2015
NASA

Announced yesterday, NASA is moving ahead with funding to study several ambitious space research projects, including one that would transform an inhospitable lunar crater into a habitat for robots — and eventually, human explorers. Located on the moon's South Pole, Shackleton Crater isn't just prime real estate for terraforming experiments, it's Optimus Prime real estate. NASA wants to fill the crater with solar-powered transformers, and then use the fleet of robots to turn the crater into a miniature hospitable environment.

Levi Sharpe
at 11:08 AM Jul 8 2015

Dogs are pretty good at sniffing out cancer, but now researchers have developed an “optical dog's nose” that uses lasers to detect a range of diseases by analyzing the molecules in ones breath.

Kelsey D. Atherton
at 11:08 AM Jul 8 2015
Drones // 

In 20 years time we will look back on the gimmick drone video as a strange artifact of the 2010s. Sometimes a marketing concept, sometimes just a joke, the gimmick drones all share in common a simple unmanned flying machine and the idea that that is enough for a technological revolution. The Whopper Dropper from 2014, recently rediscovered by The Independent, is one such artifact: A multi-copter with a claw that drops burgers to the homeless.

Mary Beth Griggs
at 11:08 AM Jul 8 2015
Drones // 

The waves of Hawaii are a big draw for tourists and surfers, but now they're also a source of electricity. For the first time in the United States, energy collected from waves is being turned into electricity that is heading onto the grid, and powering homes in Hawaii.

Alexandra Ossola
at 10:51 AM Jul 7 2015
USDA

Dengue fever is so excruciating that it is often called the “bone breaker,” causing severe pain in the joints and abdomen, vomiting, and circulatory system failure. It's nearly impossible to treat, so the only way to cut down on incidences of the disease is to decrease the number of mosquitoes that carry it. One startling effective way to do that: genetically modifying mosquitos so their offspring won't survive. A year-long trial with genetically modified mosquitoes in northeast Brazil has been the most successful yet, reducing the population of the disease-carrying insects by 95 percent, according to a study published last week in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases.

Dave Gershgorn
at 10:36 AM Jul 7 2015
Google
Cars // 

With large tech companies like Google and Uber circling driverless cars, the conversation has mostly been one of “how soon can we do this?” and not “should we?” Of course, autonomous cars would be cool, but what are the advantages besides the obvious luxury of not needing an error-prone, human hand behind the wheel?

Alexandra Ossola
at 10:36 AM Jul 7 2015
University of Florida

If you've ever woken up with a weird headache and pain in your jaw during a particularly stressful time, it might be because you were grinding your teeth, a condition called bruxism. Don't worry, though, you're not alone—one in five of us does it. Now a team of researchers from the University of Florida has created an easier way to diagnose bruxism using a smart mouthguard.

Dave Gershgorn
at 10:36 AM Jul 7 2015
Gaming // 

If you get bored building the entirety of Westeros or the limited story options in Minecraft, your prayers have been answered. Minecraft, the game defined by its thriving 70,000,000+ community of builders, is adding a separate Story Mode game, where players will be able to navigate a traditional storyline developed by Telltale Games.

Levi Sharpe
at 10:36 AM Jul 7 2015
Deepdream Bot/ Twitter

Transport yourself to a magical land of slug people, dog monsters, and other psychedelic scenes as you scroll though the Deepdream bot Twitter feed. Be forewarned, a significant portion of your day may be lost.

Kelsey D. Atherton
at 10:36 AM Jul 7 2015
Suidobashi/YouTube
Robots // 

Last week, American giant robot makers Megabot challenged Japanese giant robot makers Suidobashi Heavy Industry to a giant robot battle. The video, subtitled in Japanese and filled with waving American flags, coincidentally happened to come out right before a striking Women's World Cup championship match where the U.S. handily beat the Japanese national team. Yesterday, Suidobashi Heavy Industries posted their response:

Alexandra Ossola
at 10:36 AM Jul 7 2015

In 2003, Carly Heyman fell ill with some bizarre symptoms. She was depressed, gained 50 pounds, would sleep all day but would wake up with a start from horrible nightmares and suicidal thoughts. Her parents took her to doctor after doctor, who would only treat the symptoms but couldn't identify the cause of her illness. After several years of this, a doctor finally diagnosed her with the rare genetic disorder Fragile X syndrome—all it took was a simple hormone patch to alleviate her symptoms.

Mary Beth Griggs
at 10:36 AM Jul 7 2015
Cars // 

In terms of iconic city sights, London's double-decker bus is right up there with Paris' Eiffel Tower. And with the Eiffel Tower adding wind turbines earlier this year, it's no surprise that London is also going green, but not with envy. Or paint either.

 
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