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  • When We Weren't Looking, A Star Passed Within 0.8 Lightyears Of Earth

    The Star that 'Nearly' Hit Earth

    Around 70,000 years ago, earth was a pretty bleak place. Homo erectus had just gone extinct, and we were all in mourning. But while we were distracted by things like the near-extinction ... More >
  • This Winter Is One Of The Warmest On Record

    This Winter Is One Of The Warmest On Record

    Winter on the East Coast of the United States has been brutal, and it isn't over yet. Freezing temperatures are predicted to break even more frigid records over the next two days. Boston has been ... More >
  • World Health Organization Approves 15-Minute Ebola Detection Test

    A Super Fast Test for Ebola

    Today, the World Health Organization gave the green light to doctors in West Africa to use the first ever rapid test for diagnosing the Ebola virus. More >
  • Thermal Solar Towers Are 'Vaporising' Birds

    Thermal Solar Towers Are 'Vaporising' Birds

    The Crescent Dunes Solar Energy Project in Nevada is set to come online in March. Once completed, it will use thousands of mirrors to focus sunlight on a tower, melting millions of pounds of salt ... More >
  • Farmers Eye Drones For The Future

    Farmers Eye Drones For The Future

    Even though humans have been farming for thousands of years, there's always a new trick to learn or a new technology to try. In modern times, these tricks often come attached to small flying ... More >
Kelsey D. Atherton
at 08:20 AM Feb 27 2015
Walter, via Flickr CC BY 2.0
Drones // 

Acting as cheap flying cameras, drones already raise a lot of questions about privacy. But it's not just aerial photography people should worry about with drones. Earlier this month, AdNear, a Singaporean marketing company, flew drones with sensors that could detect cell phone signal strength and WiFi over part of Los Angeles. The drones identified and located people by the devices in their pockets, so that businesses could send highly-specific ads to their smartphones. The company praised this cyberpunk dystopian idea in a blog post, saying:

Mary Beth Griggs
at 08:20 AM Feb 27 2015
Nature // 

You make contact with a lot of cyclic volatile methyl siloxanes every day, and you probably don't even know it. The mouthful of a name refers to groups of chemicals found in numerous human-made items including lotions and other personal care products.

Sarah Fecht
at 08:20 AM Feb 27 2015
NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/MPS/DLR/IDA
Space // 

You can't trick us, Ceres. Out there in the asteroid belt, in the dark space between Mars and Jupiter, you've been keeping secrets. Scientists thought your shiny white spot was probably some kind of ice or a glassy deposit from a volcanic eruption. Others said Death Star. Now it turns out your one spot is actually two, and that's supposed to convince us Ceres is harmless? Riiight, nice try. We know the truth -- that you've only just begun to fire up your planet-destroying multi-beam superlaser.

Mary Beth Griggs
at 08:20 AM Feb 27 2015
REUTERS/Vladimir Pushkarev/Russian Centre of Arctic Exploration
Nature // 

They're baaack... Remember those weird craters that suddenly appeared in Siberia last year? They just showed up in the middle of nowhere, unannounced and unexpected. At the time, scientists got some awesome exploration pictures that don't AT ALL look like they could be the start of a Hollywood horror movie.

Kelsey D. Atherton
at 08:20 AM Feb 27 2015
Piaggio Aerospace
Drones // 

The laws of aerodynamics require a certain smoothness of form, a kind of mandatory design elegance. The Piaggio Aerospace Hammerhead stands in contrast to this romantic notion of flight, with canards and pusher propellers combining into an airplane uglier than the sum of its parts. And yet, as Piaggio announced at the International Defence Exposition held in Abu Dhabi, the Hammerhead flies!

Dan Moren
at 08:20 AM Feb 27 2015

After years of struggling and debate, the US Federal Communication Commission today voted to reclassify broadband providers under Title II of the Telecommunications Act, paving the way for new rules on net neutrality. But what does that actually mean?

Kelsey D. Atherton
at 08:20 AM Feb 27 2015
Mikael Altemark via Flickr CC BY 2.0
Science // 

Just how scary is the future? In a question posed on Twitter, the Science Friday radio show asked people to come up with #CrimeHeadlinesFrom2025. There were a lot of great responses, running the gamut from copyright law and clones to accidents involving driverless cars. The only problem? Some of the headlines are almost appropriate today. Here are three.

Lindsay Handmer
at 10:01 AM Feb 26 2015
Threadsmiths
Science // 

Aussie start-up Threadsmiths have changed the garment world with The Cavalier - a premium white or black cotton t-shirt that uses nanotechnology to repel water and other spills with a hydrophobic coating. But how well does it really work? We raided the kitchen and tested The Cavalier with every liquid we could lay our hands on.

Mary Beth Griggs
at 15:27 PM Feb 25 2015
Energy // 

In a move that surprised no one, President Obama vetoed legislation that would have permitted construction of the Keystone XL pipeline.

Mary Beth Griggs
at 10:35 AM Feb 25 2015
Cars // 

In 2003 Popular Science asked readers: "Will most Americans be driving hydrogen-powered cars by 2015?" The results to that poll are lost to time, but we already know the answer, even if 2015 isn't over yet. Unfortunately, the green technology hasn't been adopted in the past 12 years--but the next decade looks promising.

Lydia Ramsey
at 10:35 AM Feb 25 2015
Courtesy Emilie Dressaire/New York University
Science // 

Ever wonder why you always made a mess of your work clothes while carrying a cup of coffee, while your latte-drinking friends generally manage to keep it together? As it turns out, scientists were also interested in finding out why this happened (perhaps they were frustrated beverage spillers as well). They found that adding foam to the top of a beverage drastically cut down on the spillage that occurred from moving around.

Dan Moren
at 10:35 AM Feb 25 2015
Pebble
Gadgets // 

The folks from Pebble are back, and this time they've got something new up their sleeves, if you'll pardon the expression. The Pebble Time is the third incarnation of the company's smartwatch, and the first to feature a color E Ink screen.

Mary Beth Griggs
at 10:35 AM Feb 25 2015
Energy // 

On the morning of March 20, 2015, a solar eclipse will pass over all of Europe, visible from Turkey to Greenland. A decade ago, that probably wouldn't have mattered to anyone except people who love astronomy (and all the schoolchildren building pinhole cameras to observe the sun.) But now, three percent of Europe's electricity grid comes from solar power, making the March event a proving ground for this renewable energy technology.

Kelsey D. Atherton
at 10:35 AM Feb 25 2015
FNSS

No one wants to be the first to discover the use of a chemical weapon on a battlefield, but if anyone must have that job, the new Par Chemical Biological Radioactive Nuclear (CBRN) Reconnaissance Vehicle is the car to do it in. Developed by Turkish defense contractor FNSS, the CBRN version is a light armored vehicle ready for the end of the world. Even if its name is a jargony mess.

Lydia Ramsey
at 10:35 AM Feb 25 2015

From 1997 to 2010, the number of Americans with peanut allergies quadrupled. To combat the surge, the American Academy of Pediatrics created guidelines in 2000, suggesting children under the age of 3 should refrain from eating peanuts. In 2008, when this didn't seem to have any impact on the rising number of peanut allergies, the AAP retracted the recommendation. Now, a team of allergists has published a study that flies in the face of those recommendations, arguing that it is actually beneficial to feed peanuts to infants with a high risk of developing the allergy.

 
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