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  • Cooking With Lava

    Lava Cooking

    British art and design duo Bompas and Parr love crazy cooking projects and lava seemed like the ideal way to give their steak a unique flavour. Teaming up with Professor Robert Wysocki from ... More >
  • Welcome To Mars. Here's Where You'll Be Staying

    Welcome To Mars. Here's Where You'll Be Staying

    NASA has plans to put humans on Mars in the 2030s or 2040s, and the private company Mars One is already interviewing applicants for its one-way trip to the Red Planet. But a couple of crucial ... More >
  • Japan's Military Will Patrol Earth's Orbitals

    Japan's Military Will Patrol Earth's Orbitals

    Japan's military plans to take defense to the heavens in 2019. According to a report by Japan's Kyodo News Agency, Japan's Self-Defense Forces plan to add a space monitoring branch, to be ... More >
  • New Mars Rover Will Have Lasers, X-Ray Vision, And More

    New Mars Rover Does Cool Tricks

    The Curiosity rover (or Mars Science Laboratory, as NASA wonks call it) has been an immensely successful mission so far. But now NASA is planning the next mission to Mars, and today the agency ... More >
  • Milky Way Has The Mass Of 800 Billion Suns, Study Finds

    How Much Does The Milky Way?

    Astronomers have performed yet another checkup on our home galaxy, this time asking it to step on a scale. The Milky Way has a mass equal to 800 billion suns, according to the team of ... More >
Lindsay Handmer
at 10:59 AM Aug 21 2014
ESA/NASA
Space // 

With its re-supply mission to the International Space Station complete, the Cygnus Orbital-2 spacecraft Janice Voss burns up as it re-enters Earth's atmosphere. Fortunately for us German Astronaut Alexander Gerst managed to snap this amazing picture of the resulting fireball.

Francie Diep
at 09:31 AM Aug 21 2014
Image by Shaddad, accessed via NASA
Space // 

The objects that dominated the Solar System early in its history may have been small…but they didn't lack flair. A new study has found that at least one early Solar System object -- likely hundreds of kilometers or smaller in diameter -- hosted volcanic activity.

Emily Gertz
at 09:31 AM Aug 21 2014
elizaIO on Flickr
Hacks // 

Used car batteries can leech chemicals and create lead pollution when they're incorrectly trashed. A team at MIT believes that this lead can be cut out of the waste stream entirely -- and put to good use creating emissions-free energy.

Loren Grush
at 09:30 AM Aug 21 2014
NASA
Space // 

On August 14, researchers from University California, Berkeley, announced an amazing discovery from NASA’s Stardust probe: During its deep space voyage, the ship had captured seven tiny pieces of interstellar rocks, making them the first confirmed samples of intact dust from beyond the Solar System.

Sarah Fecht
at 09:30 AM Aug 21 2014
Paul Clement via Flickr By CC 2.0
Nature // 

Now Iceland is warning airlines that another volcano named Bárðarbunga may be about to blow. On Monday scientists registered the area’s largest earthquake since 1996, and they’ve spotted magma welling beneath the ground, causing Iceland’s Met office to issue a code orange risk level to the aviation industry, Reuters reports. On the scale, which comes from the International Civil Aviation Organization, the only thing riskier than orange is red. Now, the Iceland Review reports that areas north of the volcano are being evacuated. 

Francie Diep
at 09:30 AM Aug 21 2014
Warren Rachele (Wrachele) via Flickr

It's a chemical compound so new, it doesn't have a name.* In a paper, its creators call it either V116517 or Compound 37. (Like Chanel's No. 5 perfume! Except a drug.)

Kelsey D. Atherton
at 09:30 AM Aug 21 2014
Popular Science

One hundred years ago, the Panama Canal opened for the first time. A triumph of turn-of-the-century engineering, it connected Pacific and Atlantic, expanding the worlds of maritime commerce and re-writing the sea lanes of the Western Hemisphere.

Loren Grush
at 09:30 AM Aug 21 2014

This camouflage trick is a trait shared by all cephalopods – squids and cuttlefish included -- but now humans are getting in on the color-changing action too.

Sarah Fecht
at 09:30 AM Aug 21 2014
Valcrow

NASA has plans to put humans on Mars in the 2030s or 2040s, and the private company Mars One is already interviewing applicants for its one-way trip to the Red Planet. But a couple of crucial questions remain. One is, How do we get there? And another is, How the heck will we survive once we’re there?

Lindsay Handmer
at 10:52 AM Aug 20 2014
Bompas and Parr
Science // 

British art and design duo Bompas and Parr love crazy cooking projects and lava seemed like the ideal way to give their steak a unique flavour. Teaming up with Professor Robert Wysocki from Syracuse University, they successfully cooked what they described as the best steak they have ever had. But how do you create lava, let alone control it enough to cook with it?

Francie Diep
at 09:31 AM Aug 20 2014
Dreamstime

Maybe you've heard of King Henry VIII's tendency to blame his wives for giving birth to baby girls instead of male heirs. That the sex of a baby is somehow a mum's fault is a belief that's cropped up in a number of pre-scientific societies. It's total bull, of course. The sex of babies is random. For those conceiving in the old fashioned manner, there's no way to control the outcome.

John Silas Lankford
at 09:31 AM Aug 20 2014
Library of Congress, via Wikimedia Commons
Tech // 

When it opened in August 1914, the 48-mile Panama Canal provided a vital shortcut between the Atlantic and Pacific oceans, transforming trade, transportation, and even wartime strategy. France began construction on the canal in the 1880s, but failed in part because malaria, yellow fever, dysentery, and other diseases claimed the lives of approximately 20,000 workers. The U.S. took over the project in 1904 and implemented some sanitation practices -- including draining wetlands and dumping oil into lakes, puddles, and streams to keep mosquitoes from breeding. Such practices would be frowned upon today, but apparently these methods saved thousands of lives in the early 1900s. In this essay from the September 1913 issue of Popular Science, Dr. John Silas Lankford from the University of Texas describes how "the country where death with grim terror reigned as king, queen and prime minister has yielded to modern methods of sanitation and has become the home of health and happiness." You can read it in its original format here.

Kelsey D. Atherton
at 09:31 AM Aug 20 2014
DARPA

The heavy, treaded, gun-swinging battlefield behemoths know as tanks haven't changed much since their invention a century ago. Using a crapload of armor, the tank is meant to keep soldiers inside safe from bullets and other projectiles, while shooting a cannon at anything that poses a threat. But the problem with all this armor is that it makes vehicles slow and therefore more vulnerable. DARPA wants to change that. Their new Ground X-Vehicle Technology (GXV-T) initiative aims to get vehicles beyond armor, figuring out new ways to keep the people inside safe without sacrificing mobility.

Benjamin Wolfe
at 09:29 AM Aug 20 2014
Victor Kerlow
Science // 

At that moment, separated from the physical seashore by 150 miles, I began to ponder what actually accounts for the telltale flavors of the sea. People often describe the taste of uni as a meaty, in-your-face beach flavor. Nori has that green sea taste. And oysters are best when they append the bright brininess of their growing environment with their own sweet butteriness. What are the chemicals that actually create these ocean flavors?

Neel V. Patel
at 09:29 AM Aug 20 2014
Adam Rifkin/Flickr

Facial-recognition software cut its teeth on criminal mugshots, but now it offers an arguably more civic service: uniting people with potential life partners. Algorithms search for a match based on your prior dating or pet-ownership preferences. Friends accuse you of living in the past? Now you can relive it. 

 
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