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  • MIT Students Claim Astronauts Will Starve On 'Mars One' Mission

    Mars One Colonists Could Starve

    The students, part of a research group specializing in large-scale multi-billion dollar space programs, used publically available information about the Mars One mission plans to simulate ... More >
  • From The Archives: How The $10 Million Ansari X Prize Was Won

    The New Right Stuff

    Ten years ago this week, commercial spaceflight took off when a private spaceflight company won the Ansari X Prize: a space competition that was offering a $10 million reward to any ... More >
  • How An Evangelical Christian Researcher Reconciles Science With Her Faith

    The Christian Scientist

    Editor's note: Our profile of Bill Nye [September 2014] elicited an impassioned response from readers. We received more than 100 letters, many from readers grappling with how to reconcile ... More >
  • In Africa, Ebola Patients Need More Than Medicine

    Ebola Patients Need More Than Medicine

    The dusty hills around Lima sprout concrete at all angles. There are many words here for the gray delineation of poverty-struck areas: áreas tugurizadas (slum zones), the less formal tugurios ... More >
  • Space Combat Won't Look At All Like 'Star Wars'

    Space Combat Won't Look At All Like 'Star Wars'

    If humanity brings war into space, what will those battles look like? Well, if our understanding of physics is anything close to correct, they won’t look at all like Star Wars. In this six ... More >
Mary Beth Griggs
at 09:56 AM Oct 18 2014
Rubén Díaz

Scared of needles? You aren’t alone. According to some estimates, as many as 1 in every 10 people are frightened of needles, and experts fear that the fear of pain may deter people from getting important injections at the doctor’s office. 

Loren Grush
at 09:55 AM Oct 18 2014
NASA

It’s easy to forget that the International Space Station isn’t just a place for astronauts to hang out and take epic selfies. Because of its unique microgravity environment, the station is actually a valuable hub for research and development, housing hundreds of ongoing experiments that involve everything from human tissue growth to protein crystal formation. Except there’s one little snag when it comes to conducting experiments on the ISS: It’s kind of far away. Getting critical samples from the station to Earth can be a lengthy process, and researchers usually have to wait anywhere from six months to a year before samples can make the trip to laboratories on the ground. These long waits can be risky, as live biological samples have a perishable lifespan and often need to be reviewed quickly before they degrade.

Mary Beth Griggs
at 09:55 AM Oct 18 2014
UC Berkeley
Science // 

The magnetic poles of the earth have switched back and forth many, many times during the 4.54 billion years that the Earth has been around. Previous research suggested that the process of reversing the poles took place over a long time period, potentially over a few thousand years. But new research shows that the reversal could actually happen much faster than that, with the magnetic North Pole migrating to the South Pole in a time span as short as a century. 

Alissa Zhu
at 09:55 AM Oct 18 2014
Rubén Díaz
Science // 

10: Percent of people who are frightened of needles. They could benefit from a new technology which may make injections pain-free.

Kelsey D. Atherton
at 09:55 AM Oct 18 2014
NOAA, Vancouver Aquarium.
Drones // 

Here's a roundup of the week's top drone news: the military, commercial, non-profit, and recreational applications of unmanned aircraft.

Loren Grush
at 08:24 AM Oct 17 2014
ESA/Rosetta/Philae/CIVA
Space // 

After more than 10 years of traveling through space, the Rosetta spacecraft -- the first space vehicle to travel to a comet -- is finally taking a load off. Well, part of it is, anyway.

Francie Diep
at 08:24 AM Oct 17 2014
Christopher & Dana Reeve Foundation

More than 30 people who have been paralyzed by spinal-cord injuries could soon get an experimental treatment that involves sending electric currents to their spines. The Christopher and Dana Reeve Foundation is raising funds to add volunteers to an ongoing study of the treatment.

Rafi Letzter
at 08:24 AM Oct 17 2014
LincolnGroup11 via Wikimedia Commons
Science // 

Science chases progress. Researchers live under pressure from grant agencies, their peers, and the public to produce exciting results. New finds make headlines; checking old work usually does not. But when a recent study of human behavior by Sarah Brown-Schmidt and Sid Horton failed to reproduce a result from the authors' earlier research, they published a paper in the online journal PLOS ONE saying so. The response has been almost unanimously positive.

Francie Diep
at 08:24 AM Oct 17 2014
Nature // 

Can you tell the difference between robot fish and real ones? You can take this online test to find out. Here's the catch: For every question, both fish schools are rendered as green dots on the screen. It's just that one set of dots corresponds to the actual movements of Pacific Blue Eye fish researchers filmed. The other set of dots moves according to algorithms researchers wrote.

Mary Beth Griggs
at 08:24 AM Oct 17 2014
Prometheus/Twentieth Century Fox

It sounds practically perfect in every way, but there’s still a considerable amount of time and research that needs to happen before we send astronauts off to Mars via the shores of sleep. The technology that SpaceWorks is looking at is a form of therapeutic hypothermia that will drop the temperature of the astronauts’ bodies by just 5 to 10 degrees Fahrenheit, reducing their metabolism and putting them in a kind of hibernation. “It doesn’t take much to get the body to start slowing down,” says John Bradford, President of SpaceWorks Enterprises. 

Francie Diep
at 08:24 AM Oct 17 2014
NASA
Space // 

Human eyes can't (or at least shouldn't) look directly at the sun, but NASA's IRIS can. The Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph mission is the latest to fly into space to observe the solar atmosphere. Now, a little more than a year after it launched, the satellite has sent back a complex picture of a special region of the sun, just below its corona.

Mary Beth Griggs
at 08:24 AM Oct 17 2014
NAID via Wikimedia Commons

While most of the recent coverage of the ongoing Ebola outbreak has focused on rising death tolls and a few infected U.S. citizens, other segments of the population have passed mostly unnoticed from the harsh glare of the media spotlight: Survivors, and those who are seemingly immune to Ebola. 

Kelsey D. Atherton
at 08:24 AM Oct 17 2014
Rob Felt/Georgia Tech
Energy // 

How thin can an electrical generator possibly be? Thanks to a study published yesterday in Nature, the answer is about as thin as possible. Using molybdenum disulfide, researchers from the Georgia Institute of Technology and Columbia Engineering proved that a layer just an atom thick can generate an electric charge.

Dan Moren
at 19:25 PM Oct 16 2014

Minecraft has become home to any number of experiments in the can-do spirit, everything from a huge model of the U.S.S. Enterprise to working hard drives and computers. The latest venture, created by a German man, is a massive working iPhone, which you can interact with by jumping and running on a “touchscreen.”

Loren Grush
at 09:52 AM Oct 15 2014
NASA/GSFC/Arizona State University

Our cold, lifeless Moon just turned the corner into pretty hot and tempting. It turns out Earth’s satellite was once rife with volcanic activity, and some of its eruptions occurred within the past 100 million years – perhaps even within the past 50 million years. That’s about a billion years earlier than what researchers had originally assumed.

 
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