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  • The Moon May Be The Result Of Earth's Collision With Its Long-Lost Twin

    Did Earth Collide with a Long Lost Twin?

    Our beloved Moon, often the staple of a peaceful and tranquil nighttime scene, has a pretty violent origin story. In 1970, researchers proposed the “giant impact” hypothesis, which ... More >
  • Shark Attacks Are So Unlikely, But So Fascinating

    Shark Attacks Are So Unlikely, But So Fascinating

    Sharks are incredibly unlikely to bite you. They're even less likely to kill you. However, we remain fascinated with their ability--and occasional proclivity--to do just that. With so many things ... More >
  • Navy's Long-Awaited Drone Moves Closer To Reality

    Don't Let This TERN Poop On You

    DARPA's latest drone program just took a turn for the better. The Tactically Exploited Reconnaissance Node (TERN) is designed as a Medium Altitude Long Endurance (MALE) flyer for the US Navy. Like ... More >
  • Warming Climate Could Change How Food Tastes

    Warming Climate Could Change How Food Tastes

    There might be some very tangible, selfish reasons for foodies to care about climate change. It turns out that warming temperatures could not only impact our food supply, but they might also ... More >
  • Did The Future Begin In 1610?

    Did The Future Begin In 1610?

    Time is a valuable commodity for humans. We like our news up to the minute and our technology up-to-date. But when it comes to some temporal boundaries scientists are still trying to figure out ... More >
Kelsey D. Atherton
at 10:56 AM Apr 17 2015
Screenshot by author, from YouTube
Nature // 

Don't call it Ishmael; the remotely operated underwater vehicle is named Hercules. Used by the Nautilus Live expedition to explore the depths of the sea, Hercules is one of a pair of robots live-streaming the depths of the ocean. Yesterday, south of Louisiana in the Gulf of Mexico and at a depth of almost 2000 feet, Hercules (and anyone lucky enough to be watching the live stream at the time) caught something extraordinary on camera: a sperm whale.

Mary Beth Griggs
at 10:56 AM Apr 17 2015

In a country as dry as Saudi Arabia, cool watering holes are a big attraction--drawing in locals, their graffiti, and their cameras. The latter two might be an annoyance for folks just looking to cool off, but for scientists in Europe, they can also be valuable data.

Yao-Hua Law
at 10:56 AM Apr 17 2015
(H. Krisp)

Konrad Rykaczewski, an assistant professor of engineering at Arizona State University, has strived for years to develop a better anti-icing solution for airplanes. His drive is more than academic: He was once stranded for two days in London when a long snowfall depleted Heathrow Airport of the supplies of antifreeze it uses to keep ice off airplane wings.

Mary Beth Griggs
at 10:55 AM Apr 17 2015
Science // 

Have you ever been walking down the street, minding your own business, when you suddenly run into a person, or a telephone pole? Maybe you were texting a friend or fantasizing about what you would have for lunch, but now you feel like an idiot.

Kelsey D. Atherton
at 10:55 AM Apr 17 2015
Screenshot by author, from YouTube

The Navy is building a system of trucks that will fight drones with lasers, and they're advertising them with all the thrill and excitement of a second-quarter earnings report. The “Ground-Based Air Defense Directed Energy On-the-Move” weapons program, or GBAD for short, puts a laser on the back of a Humvee (or other light vehicle) and puts sensors on a couple of other Humvees. That way, when Marines drive into the battlefield, they can shoot down any cheap and hostile drones that may try to attack them.

Mary Beth Griggs
at 10:55 AM Apr 17 2015
YouTube
Nature // 

Octopuses are already hailed as masters of escape and predictors of soccer matches, but now these brilliant creatures can add another talent to their resume: photographer.

Sarah Fecht
at 10:55 AM Apr 17 2015
Science // 

Alex Bellini is an explorer. He's rowed a boat across the Atlantic Ocean, walked 1,200 miles across Alaska pulling a sled, and ran 2,300 miles across America. Next, he plans to camp out on an iceberg for a year--or as long as he can before it melts. Outside magazine reports that while there, Bellini will live inside an aluminum ball that was originally designed to protect against tsunamis.

Sarah Fecht
at 10:55 AM Apr 17 2015
Space // 

Out in the asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter, Ceres is the largest unexplored rock in our solar system. The Dawn mission arrived in Ceres' orbit back in March, but we have yet to see any great close-ups of the asteroid. That's because the spacecraft's trajectory brought it swinging around Ceres' dark side for a little while. It's still out there in the dark, but it's getting closer to the light. That's why the asteroid looks crescent-shaped in the latest and greatest images from Dawn, shown above.

Kelsey D. Atherton
at 10:55 AM Apr 17 2015
NASA/Ken Ulbrich
Drones // 

NASA's Multi-Utility Technology Testbed (MUTT) looks like a kid's cartoon drawing of an airplane crossed with a stingray, and it comes with the appropriately pet-esque moniker “Buckeye.” The remotely operated flying wing drone will test how wobbly parts work on aircraft. Last Thursday, it flew for the first time at NASA's Armstrong Flight Research Center, in Edwards, California.

Mary Beth Griggs
at 09:09 AM Apr 16 2015
NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute
Space // 

Storms here on Earth might be devastating events that can last for days and bring cities to their knees, but that's nothing compared to Saturn's storms. Massive thunderstorms complete with lightning and high winds can cover an area roughly the same size as our planet and can last for months, circumnavigating the gas giant in the process.

Alexandra Ossola
at 09:09 AM Apr 16 2015

Whether it's a nervous habit or done just by accident, most people crack their knuckles every once in a while. But the reason why joints crack at all (and the long-term effects of cracking) has been the subject of much debate in the scientific community. With the help of a real-time MRI image, a group of Canadian and Australian researchers could help settle the debate once and for all. Their work was published today in PLOS One.

Alexandra Ossola
at 09:09 AM Apr 16 2015

Over the past decade, cancer treatment has become increasingly sophisticated, harnessing a patient's own immune system to fight tumors, or decoding the genome to figure out and fix exactly which genes are out of whack. But according to a new paper published today in Science Translational Medicine, these already impressive treatments could progress even further if researchers look at tumors in 3D.

Mary Beth Griggs
at 09:09 AM Apr 16 2015
Nicholas Higgs
Nature // 

When a whale dies in the ocean, its carcass sinks slowly to the seafloor, becoming a smorgasbord for many different kinds of marine creatures. One of the weirdest of these opportunistic scavengers is a group of worms known as Osedax, a genus of bone-eaters found in oceans all over the world.

Kelsey D. Atherton
at 09:08 AM Apr 16 2015
Screenshot by author, from YouTube
Drones // 

Drones offer a lot of potential for farmers, from shining lights on crops at night to better tracking just how well crops are growing. At an asparagus farm in the Netherlands, some farmers decided to use the drones for a more novel purpose: carrying the crop itself straight to the restaurant. It was supposed to be a cheery gimmick, a unique way to start off the harvesting season. And then the drone caught fire. Watch it burn!

Rachel Fobar
at 09:08 AM Apr 16 2015
Courtesy of NASA/JPL-Caltech/WISE Team
Space // 

Just a week after NASA scientists announced their certainty of finding alien life within the next 20 years, a team of scientists say they've found no obvious signs of advanced extraterrestrial life after searching 100,000 galaxies.

 
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