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  • Popular Science's Spaceship Design Contest Winners!

    Popular Science's Spaceship Design Contest Winners!

    This past April, we put out a call for your ambitious spaceship designs. The only real rules were that we wanted to see an image, and that "the ideas must meet a certain threshold of seriousness, ... More >
  • Pangea Broke Apart As Fast As Fingernails Grow

    Pangea Broke Apart As Fast As Fingernails Grow

    Hang on to your land masses: we now know that the continents split apart in a big hurry. University of Sydney researchers studying seismic data from hundreds of millions of years ago found that ... More >
  • The AI Bots Are About To Get Emotional

    The AI Bots Are About To Get Emotional

    We already interact with artificial intelligence in our daily lives. Furby and Clippy were early forms; driverless cars and Facebook's chatbots pick up the mantle today. But if AI is to continue ... More >
  • Roach Milk: The Next Superfood?

    Roach Milk: The Next Superfood?

    Joining the ranks of pigeons and spiders, cockroaches are the latest animal of questionable merit to get milked in the name of science. More >
  • This Is What Humans Would Look Like If We Could Withstand Car Wrecks

    Graham Has Issues

    There's something a bit grasshopper-like about Graham. This man-sized sculpture sports a head that melds right into his torso, which is supported by a pair of strong, springy legs. But Graham's ... More >
Kate Baggaley
at 11:53 AM Aug 23 2016
Balla et al. (2016)
Nature // 

Certain parasitic fungi fuse together their host's cells in order to multiply, scientists reported today in Nature Microbiology.

Samantha Cole
at 11:53 AM Aug 23 2016
Wikimedia Commons

For the first time, scientists viewed brain neurotransmitters moving and firing in real-time, shedding light on how our mental circuitry works.

Mary Beth Griggs
at 11:53 AM Aug 23 2016
Nature // 

Transitioning into adulthood is a difficult time in anyone's life. But for some sea creatures, the transition requires being stabbed with the spear-like appendage of a bacteria.

G. Clay Whittaker
at 11:53 AM Aug 23 2016
Paul Adams

There are things you shouldn't swallow. There are things you really shouldn't swallow, and then there's the idea of swallowing 40 knives.

Kelsey D. Atherton
at 11:53 AM Aug 23 2016
Chris Hubenthal, United States Air Force

Soldier are preparing for war with robots. Let me rephrase. Soldiers are preparing for war, alongside robots. As part of the Pacific Manned-Unmanned Initiative, soldiers with the U.S. Army's 25th Infantry Division tested prototypes of robots, to see if they might be useful in future battles.

Corey Mueller
at 11:53 AM Aug 23 2016
NBA 2K17
Gaming // 

NBA 2K17 released its newest trailer today, previewing the game's new features and the league's biggest stars on their new teams.

Kate Baggaley
at 11:53 AM Aug 23 2016
Nature // 

When the Australian pygmy-possum goes dormant to save energy, it doesn't completely lose its ability to respond to danger. Pygmy-possums can smell smoke and begin to climb while in a state of torpor, scientists from the University of New England in Armidale, Australia reported today in the journal The Science of Nature. The results offer evidence that hibernating animals can wake up and flee an oncoming blaze.

G. Clay Whittaker
at 11:53 AM Aug 23 2016
YouTube
Science // 

Here's an interesting question that's more fitting to be answered at home as a bar trick than a science experiment: can a saw blade made of paper cut through wood?

G. Clay Whittaker
at 11:53 AM Aug 23 2016

Apple's latest acquisition may shed light on the future of its health software. The company just acquired Gliimpse [sic], as Fast Company reports, which lets users securely collect and share their own medical records digitally, however they wish.

Kate Baggaley
at 11:53 AM Aug 23 2016
Kevin Gill via Flickr
Space // 

Saturn's moon Daphnis is only five miles in diameter, but its orbit can still make some waves.

G. Clay Whittaker
at 11:53 AM Aug 23 2016
Instagram

Researchers from Harvard and the University of Vermont have built an algorithm that can determine whether a person is depressed based on their Instagram posts.

Kelsey D. Atherton
at 11:53 AM Aug 23 2016
Department Of Justice

Helmets may not be as old as war itself, but it's no coincidence that less than 25 years after the first recorded war, we have historical evidence of soldiers wearing helmets. Humans are nothing without their brains, and the protective bone of the skull isn't enough to withstand weapons made for, well, splattering bones. Humanity has at least 4,500 years of experience building helmets, and while weapons changed innumerable times in those millennia, helmet technology was always just a step behind.

Samantha Cole
at 11:53 AM Aug 23 2016
SpaceX

We don't typically get rockets back in one piece. They're shot beyond the atmosphere at 18,000 miles per hour and come back moments or weeks later at hypersonic speeds, usually in bits and pieces left in the ocean. So if we're going to start bringing them back — as SpaceX sticks more and more landings — we'll need to know where to retire them, too.

Mary Beth Griggs
at 11:53 AM Aug 23 2016
Nature // 

Usually, when people think about moving, they think about the hassle of moving a family from one neighborhood, apartment, house, or city to another neighborhood, apartment, house or city. They don't think about what it would take to move an entire town.

Samantha Cole
at 11:53 AM Aug 23 2016
Flickr user nathanmac87
Science // 

Smell plays a large evolutionary part in picking potential mates. Our noses know how to diversify our gene pools, when fertility is at its height — and also detect who will agree with our political stance. Sense of smell even correlates with social circle size.

 
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