Oops! Something went wrong. Please scroll down to find your content.
  • How To Give A Mouse Ebola

    How To Give A Mouse Ebola

    If you give a lab mouse the mouse version of Ebola, it will die. But not in the same way humans with Ebola do. Lab mice infected with Ebola don't get hemorrhagic fever. They don't form tiny clots ... More >
  • The Co-Robots In 'Interstellar' Are Gorgeous--And Silly

    What the Heck is a Co-Robot?

    When humans finally set foot on an alien world, they’ll be joined by robots. That’s not a bold prediction. It’s a statement of the obvious. Machines have already beat us to Mars ... More >
  • Interstellar Travel Won't Look Anything Like The Movie

    Interstellar Travel Won't Look Like The Movie

    Christopher Nolan's Interstellar imagines a human journey to planets beyond our star. But that kind of trip would seem impossible in today's terms. Fortunately, a DARPA-funded task ... More >
  • Future Aeroplanes Might Replace Windows With OLED Screens

    Future Planes Might Have No Windows

    There may be no such thing as a window seat on the airliners of the future. A concept released by the U.K.’s Centre for Process Innovation (CPI) envisions airliners with thinner walls, made ... More >
  • MIT Students Claim Astronauts Will Starve On 'Mars One' Mission

    Mars One Colonists Could Starve

    The students, part of a research group specializing in large-scale multi-billion dollar space programs, used publically available information about the Mars One mission plans to simulate ... More >
Loren Grush
at 14:35 PM Nov 1 2014
Xinhua
Space // 

On its trip around the Moon this week, China’s lunar test probe, Chang’e 5TI, snapped this mind-bending image of the Earth and its satellite, putting the objects in a unique perspective. The photo is taken from just beyond lunar orbit, and it gives the illusion that the Moon is actually the more sizable of the two, and that Earth is the tiny orbiter.

Kelsey D. Atherton
at 14:35 PM Nov 1 2014
Matthew Lee, via Wikimedia Commons
Tech // 

What’s a country to do with a chain of disputed islands? One option is just “go ahead and build a dock to claim them,” and attach it to some of the islands. Shown off at the Shiptec China 2014 exhibition, China has a plan for floating docks it wants to put in the disputed Spratly Islands.

Bill Nye
at 14:35 PM Nov 1 2014
Flickr/spidermandragon5
Nature // 

What if there were an enormous war and all of our intercontinental means of transportation were destroyed? Perhaps then an isolated population of people would live apart from the rest of us for so long that they would no longer be able to successfully interbreed. Just listen to all the dialects we have for speaking English. When human populations are even a little bit separate, they start talking differently. Other bigger changes might happen with more profound separation. Perhaps this could happen somewhere beyond Earth, even, such as in a colony on Mars. Without geographic isolation, I am not sure we can get a new species of hominid, not ever. But that is not the same thing as saying that humans are no longer evolving, because we surely are.

Mary Beth Griggs
at 14:35 PM Nov 1 2014
Paulio Geordio
Science // 

Planes, trains and automobiles create the noisy background to our lives--especially in urban areas. In addition to getting us from point A to point wherever-we're-headed, the swift movement of transportation creates plenty of noise and vibrations. But the low-frequency noise of these vibrations is usually completely unnoticed by humans, until now. Scientists presenting their research at the Acoustical Society of America (ASA) meeting this week announced that they can monitor those vibrations using seismic networks. 

Adam Piore
at 14:34 PM Nov 1 2014
Harold Daniels
Robots // 

Andrea Thomaz, who directs Georgia Tech’s Socially Intelligent Machines Lab, teaches a one-of-a-kind student: a robot with light-up ears, named Curi. We asked Thomaz how she envisions life with robots unfolding.

Loren Grush
at 14:34 PM Nov 1 2014
Harold Meerveld via Flickr CC by 2.0

The latest pharmaceutical candidate on scientists’ radar is called rapamycin, a drug typically used to suppress the immune system and prevent kidney transplant rejection. As an added bonus, the drug also appears to extend the lives of some mammals. Before humans can get their hands on it, though, the drug will be used on other patients first: pet dogs.

Loren Grush and Kelsey D. Atherton
at 14:34 PM Nov 1 2014
Virgin Galactic

There’s a growing, looming shadow over the private spaceflight industry. Virgin Galactic’s SpaceShipTwo, a suborbital rocket designed for tourists, crashed on Friday, Oct. 31 due to an “in-flight anomaly" during a powered test flight over the Mojave Desert.

Kelsey D. Atherton
at 14:34 PM Nov 1 2014
Panelfestoon, via Wikimedia Commons
Drones // 

Here's a roundup of the week's top drone news: the military, commercial, non-profit, and recreational applications of unmanned aircraft.

Loren Grush
at 07:20 AM Oct 31 2014
SuperJet International via Flickr

At first, the video displays the virtual insides of a crowded passenger airplane. Then all of a sudden, one of the passengers seated in the middle "sneezes." Hundreds of multicolored particles are jettisoned into the air, creating a rainbow-speckled cloud that lingers above everyone’s heads. The cloud dissolves, and the particles disperse, making their way to the unlucky few seated adjacent to the sick passenger.

Loren Grush
at 07:20 AM Oct 31 2014
Detlev Van Ravenswaay/SPL
Space // 

Criticism continues to grow for NASA’s Asteroid Retrieval Mission (ARM) -- the space agency’s plan to capture a 10-meter-wide piece of an asteroid and bring it into lunar orbit for further analysis. Among experts’ complaints: The mission is expensive; it doesn’t really further our knowledge of asteroids; and it doesn’t help us get to Mars.

Mary Beth Griggs
at 07:20 AM Oct 31 2014
Public domain via Wikimedia Commons
Science // 

Amelia Earhart disappeared 77 years ago, but 2014 is turning out to be a banner year for her. Her namesake completed a memorial flight around the world, reenacting the original Earhart's infamous flight (without so much of a tragic ending). Now, a group believes that they have found a piece of Earhart's ill-fated plane.   

Rebecca Lantner
at 07:20 AM Oct 31 2014
Sam Kaplan
Fitness // 

Bad news, trick-or-treaters: A new recommendation from the World Health Organization (WHO) deals a serious blow to your annual candy binge. The guideline, set to be released this fall, drops the suggested daily intake of “free sugars”—those added to processed foods, such as high-fructose corn syrup, and those that result when naturally occurring sugars are refined, as with maple syrup.

Francie Diep
at 07:20 AM Oct 31 2014
Brian Donohue

If you give a lab mouse the mouse version of Ebola, it will die. But not in the same way humans with Ebola do. Lab mice infected with Ebola don't get hemorrhagic fever. They don't form tiny clots in their blood, like human Ebola sufferers do, even though the genetic sequence of the mouse Ebolavirus differs from human Ebolavirus in only 13 out of its nearly 19,000 DNA letters.

Mary Beth Griggs
at 07:20 AM Oct 31 2014
lawrencegs via Flickr
Gadgets // 

One of the selling points of Google Glass is its ability to take pictures and video of anything within your field of vision, but when that field of vision is occupied by the latest major motion picture, your Google Glass now needs to be far, far away. 

Mary Beth Griggs
at 08:44 AM Oct 30 2014
Science // 

Forensic scientists often have to reconstruct the events leading up to and following a person's death, in case of foul play. The state of the body can reveal when the person died, how, and where the body was disposed of.

 
1 2 3 4 5 ... 378
Sign up for the Pop Sci newsletter
Australian Popular Science
ON SALE 30 OCTOBER
PopSci Live