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  • A Strong Signal From A Neighboring Solar System Has ET Seekers Speculating

    Is This Signal Alien Life At Last?

    Is someone trying to phone home? Astronomers at the SETI institute have detected "a strong signal" in the direction of HD164595, a star 95 light years from Earth. At least one Neptune-sized planet ... More >
  • Your Coffee Addiction May Be In Your Genes

    Your Coffee Addiction May Be In Your Genes

    If you're already jittering from excessive coffee today, you can blame it on your genes. An affinity for this magic hot bean elixir could be a matter of genetic makeup, according to researchers ... More >
  • Coming Soon To A Grocery Store Shelf Near You: Mealworm Oil

    Will You Be Buying Mealworm Oil?

    You know what adds the perfect zest to a roach milk shake? A nice drizzle of mealworm oil. And why not. It has all the advantages of other oils with only the mild disadvantage of being made from ... More >
  • What You Need To Know About The EpiPen

    Why the EpiPen is Important

    If you have a life-threatening allergy, you've probably been prescribed an EpiPen to use in case of emergencies. You might keep it in your purse or at your office and not given it a whole lot of ... More >
  • Playing An iPad Game Is Just As Soothing As Sedatives

    iPad Games Work Like Sedatives

    It's a common strategy for exhausted parents: if the kid's being fussy, put him/her in front of a screen. Turns out, it works so well that it's better than a sedative for children in the operating ... More >
Jeffrey Lin and P.W. Singer
at 10:21 AM Sep 28 2016
Hongjian, via CETC

China Electronics Technology Group Corporation (CETC), China's foremost military electronics company, has announced that its scientists have tested a quantum radar to the range of 100km, beating out known American and German competition by 500%. This is a significant claim to make, as a quantum radar would theoretically be able to detect stealth aircraft at long ranges.

Samantha Cole
at 11:40 AM Sep 27 2016
Flickr user OnInnovation

Elon Musk probably writes "try to save the world" at the top of his to-do list every day, above running companies that are revolutionizing energy, transportation, and space travel. In the next decade, he's hoping to pioneer humanity's next great adventure: Interplanetary travel, and colonization of other worlds.

Mary Beth Griggs
at 11:40 AM Sep 27 2016
NASA/JHUAPL/Carnegie Institution of Washington/USGS/Arizona State University
Space // 

Mercury can't get a break. Not only is it the smallest officially recognized planet in our Solar System, but it's also shrinking. In a study published in Nature Geoscience, new analysis of photos taken by NASA's MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft show distinct landforms that indicate the planet is still contracting as it slowly cools down from its molten early years at the start of the Solar System.

Peter Hess
at 11:40 AM Sep 27 2016
Letvision
Gadgets // 

As children, many of us sat in front of the television on Saturday mornings, wishing the characters from fantasy worlds would inhabit our own. Now, a Turkish startup called Letvision is working to make that dream a reality. They recently unveiled a Transformer-inspired machine that starts out as a mild-mannered BMW coupe, and with the work of hydraulics and servos it reveals its secret identity as a massive humanoid robot.

Kelsey D. Atherton
at 11:40 AM Sep 27 2016
Screenshot by author, from Vimeo
Nature // 

Automating forestry is an uphill battle. Trees grow well on slopes and steep inclines, which are difficult for farming equipment, adapted as it is to sweeping, gentle plains. This is especially hard for the replanting part of responsible forestry, where seedlings need deliberate, tender care so they can begin to replace their fallen predecessors. This is, right now, a human intensive process, but startup DroneSeed wants to turn over the entire process to, you guessed it, drones.

Sarah Fecht
at 11:40 AM Sep 27 2016
NASA/ESA/W. Sparks (STScI)/USGS Astrogeology Science Center
Space // 

Hubble's view of huge plumes of water vapor in 2013, data shown superimposed on a photo of Europa

Samantha Cole
at 11:40 AM Sep 27 2016
C. Rabeling and J. Sosa-Calvo
Nature // 

Out of the belly of a bright orange frog, a mysterious species of ant appears.

Kelsey D. Atherton
at 11:40 AM Sep 27 2016
UPS
Drones // 

UPS has over 100,000 cars, vans, tractors, and motorcycles in its delivery fleet, and over 500 jets owned or chartered. That's a massive fleet by any metric, and one with a tremendous amount of reach for the delivery giant. Yet it's a fleet with one major limitation: the jets need large runways to land, and the automobiles are all limited by land. This is fine for people on the mainland, but what if UPS wants to deliver something to a small island, one without the space for a runway or ferry? Drones. Drones are the obvious answer.

Mary Beth Griggs
at 11:40 AM Sep 27 2016

Every year around Spring Break there is a mass migration in which flocks of families from mid-Michigan flee the winter cold and head South, down to Orlando, Florida and the many theme parks there. They return a week later, satiated with fun and sun, cleansed of their worries by the vacation and their kidney stones by the roller coasters.

Samantha Cole
at 11:40 AM Sep 27 2016
Twitter via Elon Musk
Space // 

Take a long, loving gaze into the fiery plume of a rocket that could someday save humanity. It's the kind of beautiful fireball you could get lost in.

Amy Shira Teitel
at 11:40 AM Sep 27 2016
NASA

At 7 o'clock on the morning on April 4, 1968, Apollo 6 thundered off the launch pad. Everything looked perfect until the rocket started vibrating in flight so hard it was almost bouncing up and down. The so-called pogo effect (it's almost like the rocket is bouncing on a pogo stick) increased g-forces in the spacecraft and shook the rocket's frame so hard that loose structural panels on the lunar module adapter section fell off. The irregular launch also destroyed the flight path, leaving the spacecraft in a highly elliptical orbit rather than the planned circular one. Luckily Apollo 6 was unmanned, but the problem was bigger than one mission. NASA had spent years solving the pogo problem only to see it return, this time threatening manned lunar missions.

Stacy Morford
at 11:40 AM Sep 27 2016
NOAA
Science // 

Along the walls of Oceanographer Canyon, fish dart in and out of colorful anemone gardens and sea creatures send up plumes of sand and mud as they burrow. Bill Ryan, an oceanographer at Columbia University's Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, watched the scenes through the windows of a mini research submarine in 1978 as he became one of the few people to explore the seafloor canyons that President Obama has now designated a national monument.

Claire Maldarelli
at 11:40 AM Sep 27 2016
Mustafah Abdulaziz / WWF-UK
Science // 

Can you see Saturn's moon Pan? Its that tiny white dot left of center, within Saturn's rings. Despite its size in comparison to the planet, the moon actually plays a key role in shaping Saturn's changing rings. NASA's Cassini spacecraft captured this image on July 2 of this year from a distance of about 840,000 miles away.

Samantha Cole
at 11:40 AM Sep 27 2016
NASA/JHUAPL/SWRI
Space // 

Pluto's shown us its heart, and its potential for vast liquid water ocean habitats so far from the Sun — on a cosmic body we demoted, no less — is mind-boggling in itself. To add to the "holy wow" of what Pluto can tell us, scientists now have reason to believe that the dwarf planet's ocean is incredibly deep.

Kelsey D. Atherton
at 11:40 AM Sep 27 2016
PostBus
Cars // 

Robots, too, can be bad drivers. As the world prepares for the coming future of driverless cars, there are bound to be a few accidents. Launched this summer, a trial of PostBus driverless shuttles in Sion, Switzerland was expected to continue through October 2017. Instead, one of the two shuttles hit a parked van earlier this week, sending the whole trial into a screeching halt.

 
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