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  • When We Weren't Looking, A Star Passed Within 0.8 Lightyears Of Earth

    The Star that 'Nearly' Hit Earth

    Around 70,000 years ago, earth was a pretty bleak place. Homo erectus had just gone extinct, and we were all in mourning. But while we were distracted by things like the near-extinction ... More >
  • This Winter Is One Of The Warmest On Record

    This Winter Is One Of The Warmest On Record

    Winter on the East Coast of the United States has been brutal, and it isn't over yet. Freezing temperatures are predicted to break even more frigid records over the next two days. Boston has been ... More >
  • World Health Organization Approves 15-Minute Ebola Detection Test

    A Super Fast Test for Ebola

    Today, the World Health Organization gave the green light to doctors in West Africa to use the first ever rapid test for diagnosing the Ebola virus. More >
  • Thermal Solar Towers Are 'Vaporising' Birds

    Thermal Solar Towers Are 'Vaporising' Birds

    The Crescent Dunes Solar Energy Project in Nevada is set to come online in March. Once completed, it will use thousands of mirrors to focus sunlight on a tower, melting millions of pounds of salt ... More >
  • Farmers Eye Drones For The Future

    Farmers Eye Drones For The Future

    Even though humans have been farming for thousands of years, there's always a new trick to learn or a new technology to try. In modern times, these tricks often come attached to small flying ... More >
Lydia Ramsey
at 08:26 AM Mar 5 2015
Sezer Yadigar/Getty Images
Science // 

In 2009, a Maryland county court convicted Glenn Raynor of rape, the verdict hinging on a key piece of evidence: Raynor's DNA samples. However, Raynor didn't give his DNA willingly. After he consistently refused to provide any samples to the police, officers snagged a few samples of Raynor's sweat from a chair he had been sitting in during an interrogation session. The DNA matched DNA found at the crime scene, and the prosecution built their case around that fact, leading to a 100-year prison sentence.

Dan Moren
at 08:26 AM Mar 5 2015

The latest security vulnerability to make the rounds, aptly dubbed FREAK, shines a spotlight on why it's maybe not such a great idea to weaken the technology behind the security that we all rely on. Turns out that we're still paying for the mistakes of the 1990s--and I don't mean acid-washed jeans.

Kelsey D. Atherton
at 08:26 AM Mar 5 2015
Carlos J. Sanchez et al
Robots // 

Designing an inch-long robot is tricky: there are lots of small moving parts, and it's hard to get a tiny enough battery that can still power the entire system. Instead of designing a whole new robot body, scientists at Texas A&M University instead hijacked an existing, efficient form: cockroaches. Using an implant that plugs into the roach's nervous system, they were able to steer the cockroach in the correct direction 60 percent of the time.

Mary Beth Griggs
at 08:26 AM Mar 5 2015
Nature // 

Think tuberculosis (TB), and you might think of a tragic heroine wasting away, droplets of blood on her handkerchief like Satine in Moulin Rouge! or Mimi in La Bohème. But when farmers hear TB, they think cows.

Alexandra Ossola
at 08:26 AM Mar 5 2015

Everyone knows the age-old tactics for losing weight: eat better, eat less, and exercise more. But researchers at the University of Southern California may have found a way to sidestep that simple-sounding advice. Mice injected with a newly discovered hormone called MOTS-c gained less weight and were better able to regulate blood sugar, the same benefits they would have received if they had been exercising.

Dan Moren
at 08:26 AM Mar 5 2015
Gadgets // 

If there is one thing that has driven humanity forward in the last several centuries of technological progress, one thing that we've striven for above all others, one thing to which we bring our ingenuity and prowess to bear upon with laser-like focus, it is ordering pizza.

Michael Nuñez
at 08:25 AM Mar 5 2015
SanDisk
Mobile // 

Let's face it: Storage devices aren't exactly the most exciting pieces of hardware. They either work or they don't. And when they don't work, they can cause major headaches. For the last decade, SanDisk has prevented those type of headaches by providing some of the most reliable storage devices on the market. Now it's going a step further by providing the highest capacity microSD card in the world.

Kelsey D. Atherton
at 08:25 AM Mar 5 2015
RuptlyTV, via Youtube screenshot
Drones // 

In another timeline, these silver jets glistening in the snow would be radioactive wrecks, doomed participants in an apocalyptic war. Instead, these retired Soviet jets wait as museum pieces on the grounds outside Russia's Central Air Force Museum in Moscow. There's an American counterpart in the desert outside Tuscon, full of former Cold Warriors cooking out in the sun, and there are others in Russia itself. Still, this one provides a nice footnote to the history of 1950s MiG fighters and abandoned supersonic bombers: The museum was recently filmed by drone, a robotic eye from a remote control vehicle capturing the stillness of history.

Dan Moren
at 08:25 AM Mar 5 2015
Google

Imagine you want to figure out how accurate something is. How would you go about it? Well, you might go to the library, find the relevant encyclopedia article, and read it. But let's be honest: in this day and age, you'll probably just type your question into Google.

Alexandra Ossola
at 08:25 AM Mar 5 2015

Traumatic injuries, like falls or car crashes, can cause the victim to lose a lot of blood very quickly. The result is thousands of preventable deaths per year, especially among Americans under age 44, for whom injury is the leading cause of death. Researchers at the University of Washington have developed an injectable material that can help blood clot faster and more effectively, plugging up the wound to stop the bleeding. The study was published today in the journal Science Translational Medicine.

Mary Beth Griggs
at 08:25 AM Mar 5 2015
Energy // 

Offshore wind farms in the United States are the new flying car. We keep saying that it's just around the corner but somehow practical results never manifest. Europe has 2,488 offshore wind turbines up and running, with 408 installed in the last year; this nation has a grand total of zero. (U-S-A! U-S-... ah, forget it.) However, a plucky new company could soon change that.

Nsikan Akpan
at 08:25 AM Mar 5 2015
WearSens

A new smart necklace aims to rid us of our eating sins by automatically guessing the portions and contents of our meals. The device is called WearSens, and it was developed by UCLA engineers to provide more accountability over what we devour.

Alexandra Ossola
at 08:25 AM Mar 5 2015
Mobile // 

Fumbling for a cell phone that rang during a meeting can be pretty embarrassing, and tapping out an email on a smartwatch is always a frustrating experience. To make mobile devices even simpler to control, a team of German and American computer scientists has created a patch called the iSkin that turns your epidermis into a digital interface. Just place the patch on your preferred body part, and with a few simple taps, you can answer calls, raise or lower music volume, or type on a bigger smartwatch keyboard without having to grope for the phone in your pocket or bag.

Mary Beth Griggs
at 09:39 AM Mar 4 2015
RÜDIGER LAINER+ PARTNER
Tech // 

Next year in Vienna, architects will start working on a 275-foot-tall building made almost entirely out of wood. The Guardian reports that the approximately 25-story building will cost 60 million Euros ($67 million) and will save 2,800 tons of carbon emissions compared to building a similar structure made of concrete.

Michael Nuñez
at 09:39 AM Mar 4 2015
Mobile // 

Before this week's Mobile World Congress 2015 (MWC) in Barcelona, Samsung had its back against the wall. The company reported slumping sales of its flagship smartphone , and many believed its dominance in the smartphone world was coming to an end. But after Samsung's latest smartphone release it's clear that there are plenty of innovative ideas coming from the company.

 
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