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  • Did The Future Begin In 1610?

    Did The Future Begin In 1610?

    Time is a valuable commodity for humans. We like our news up to the minute and our technology up-to-date. But when it comes to some temporal boundaries scientists are still trying to figure out ... More >
  • Why A Real CHAPPiE Robot Would Be More Of A Mystery Than A Friend

    A Real CHAPPiE Would Be... Weird

    Neil Blomkamp's new film CHAPPiE, which hits US theaters this weekend, follows the unlikely transformation of a defective robot into a one-of-a-kind conscious machine. The movie inserts ... More >
  • Tony Stark Gives Boy A Bionic Arm [Video]

    Tony Stark Gives Boy A Bionic Arm [Video]

    Today in "Robert Downey Jr. saves the world," the Hollywood superstar presented an Iron Man-style bionic arm to a young disabled boy named Alex. More >
  • Welcome To The Inflatable Space Age

    Welcome To The Inflatable Space Age

    This morning Robert Bigelow—budget hotel billionaire; paranormal investigator; space entrepreneur—unveiled the Bigelow Expandable Activity Module (BEAM), which will soon ship to ... More >
  • NASA: Ganymede Has A Saltwater Ocean

    NASA: Ganymede Has A Saltwater Ocean

    NASA announced today that researchers using the Hubble space telescope have detected the presence of a saltwater ocean on Ganymede, Jupiter's largest moon. More >
Mary Beth Griggs
at 09:45 AM Mar 26 2015
Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society
Nature // 

It might not be able to grow a thicker skin, but the newly discovered frog Pristimantis mutabilis and its relatives can change their skin's texture.

Dan Moren
at 09:45 AM Mar 26 2015
Gadgets // 

A little over two weeks from now, the Apple Watch will be on display at Apple Stores around the world, and much of the mystery over the product will have evaporated. But for now, if you're looking to see what Apple's smartwatch looks like on your own wrist, your only recourse is to turn to technology.

Alexandra Ossola
at 09:45 AM Mar 26 2015
Fitness // 

Rice, the base for cuisines all over the world, contains a lot of starch. That makes it delicious but also high in calories. While that may a boon for people who struggle to ingest enough calories each day, it's becoming a problem for people with sedentary lifestyles who are eating too many calories. The result is a worldwide obesity crisis, and, surprisingly, the percent of obese adults is increasing faster in developing countries. Now a team of Sri Lankan researchers has devised a new way to cook rice that reduces the amount of starch--and calories--the body absorbs from rice by up to 60 percent. The researchers presented their findings this week at the meeting of the American Chemical Society in Denver.

Andrew Zaleski
at 09:45 AM Mar 26 2015
Stanford-Brown-Spelman iGEM
Drones // 

NASA is working on a prototype drone that will be able to survey Mars from a modest altitude. But what if instead of shipping a drone to Mars, we could just ship small vials of cells, and use them to grow a biodegradable drone on the Red Planet? A team of students from Stanford University, Spelman College, and Brown University created such a drone last summer, which they then entered into the 2014 International Genetically Engineered Machine competition.

Kelsey D. Atherton
at 09:45 AM Mar 26 2015
P199, via Wikimedia Commons

Aliens traveling at near the speed of light won't go undetected, according to two researchers at Raytheon. Posted on the arXiv, their paper argues that fast-traveling vehicles will still be visible, thanks to the way they interact with photons.

Kelsey D. Atherton
at 09:45 AM Mar 26 2015
Andrey via Flickr CC BY 2.0
Drones // 

Drones, as low-cost flying machines, make great rescue tools. They can look and go places people can't--or at least can't go safely--and with infrared cameras, they can sometimes see beyond what human eyes can. In Houston, the World Animal Awareness Society plans to use them to track stray dogs, combining a drone's utility as a mapping device with its rescue abilities.

Alexandra Ossola
at 09:45 AM Mar 26 2015

Though we're a long way from Robocop, cyborgs are real, even if they're sometimes too small to see. The newest iteration is a bacterial spore with quantum dots on its cell membrane that generate an electrical charge when the cell expands and shrinks depending on the humidity in the surrounding environment. The study was published recently in the journal Scientific Reports.

Kelsey D. Atherton
at 09:44 AM Mar 26 2015
Zeynel Cebeci, via Wikimedia Commons
Drones // 

Last week, the FAA did something strange: it granted Amazon a certificate to test drones, provided Amazon test those drones under a set of incredibly tight restrictions that don't match with Amazon's planned drone delivery model at all. Yesterday, at a Senate hearing on commercial drones, Amazon's VP for public policy blasted the FAA, saying the certificate only lets them test obsolete models. He said, as reported by CNET, “We don't test it anymore. We've moved on to more-advanced designs that we already are testing abroad.”

Loren Grush
at 09:44 AM Mar 26 2015
NASA
Space // 

NASA's Asteroid Redirect Mission, the space agency's initiative to capture a small piece of an asteroid and then bring it into lunar orbit, is moving on to Phase A. That means the project is going beyond the concept phase now, and engineers will get to work designing and making the hardware to turn the mission into reality.

Mary Beth Griggs
at 09:44 AM Mar 26 2015
Energy // 

Renewable energy is having its moment in the sun...and wind, and water. Costa Rica managed to run on 100 percent renewable power for over 75 days. And in Texas, a state historically associated with oil wells, one metropolis is determined to achieve the same goal, going cold turkey on fossil fuels by 2017.

Alexandra Ossola
at 10:46 AM Mar 25 2015

For most people, chocolate is considered an indulgence to be enjoyed in moments of weakness. The cacao pod from which chocolate is made, though, is a rich source of healthful polyphenols, and now researchers have found a different way of processing the cocoa that will keep more of those components while maintaining that delicious chocolaty flavor we all know and love. The international team of researchers presented their work today at the conference of the American Chemical Society in Denver.

Dan Moren
at 10:46 AM Mar 25 2015

Back in 1999, Neal Stephenson's novel Cryptonomicon introduced me to the idea of Van Eck phreaking—intercepting the weak electromagnetic radiation from a computer monitor to recreate what the person is seeing on the screen. Now security researchers have come up with an exploit that uses an even simpler form of radiation: heat.

Kelsey D. Atherton
at 10:46 AM Mar 25 2015
Fabien Expert and Franck Ruffier, CC BY 3.0
Drones // 

Secretly, a lot of drones are cell phone parts disguised as flying machines. Advances in cellular technology, like miniaturized powerful batteries, cheaper smaller cameras, and sensors like accelerometers have all found their way from our pockets to the skies. Now, a new drone eye wants to shed cell parts like a vestigial tail, and instead make drones fly on sight alone.

Mary Beth Griggs
at 10:46 AM Mar 25 2015
Energy // 

The road of the future will probably be incredibly high-tech: able to inform drivers of hazardous conditions, charge buses, and even communicate with the cars driving on top of it. But will the road of the future be made of green asphalt?

Kelsey D. Atherton
at 10:46 AM Mar 25 2015
Screenshot by author from Battle for Donetsk
Drones // 

Without planning it, the first thing I did was break a ceasefire. My newly hired infantryman marched across the rubble-strewn battlefield, soon accompanied by medics and heavy weapons. Across the way, marching from another ruined truck with a different flag on top, came my opponent's army, all in single file. Later, after my mortars fell silent and tanks broke down, I was greeted with a defeat screen, noting that while I had bested my opponent, I had really suffered a loss because of all the civilians I killed. "Battle For Donetsk" is a browser game about Ukraine's current war. It's a straightforward medium with a blunt message.

 
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