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  • Popular Science's Spaceship Design Contest Winners!

    Popular Science's Spaceship Design Contest Winners!

    This past April, we put out a call for your ambitious spaceship designs. The only real rules were that we wanted to see an image, and that "the ideas must meet a certain threshold of seriousness, ... More >
  • Pangea Broke Apart As Fast As Fingernails Grow

    Pangea Broke Apart As Fast As Fingernails Grow

    Hang on to your land masses: we now know that the continents split apart in a big hurry. University of Sydney researchers studying seismic data from hundreds of millions of years ago found that ... More >
  • The AI Bots Are About To Get Emotional

    The AI Bots Are About To Get Emotional

    We already interact with artificial intelligence in our daily lives. Furby and Clippy were early forms; driverless cars and Facebook's chatbots pick up the mantle today. But if AI is to continue ... More >
  • Roach Milk: The Next Superfood?

    Roach Milk: The Next Superfood?

    Joining the ranks of pigeons and spiders, cockroaches are the latest animal of questionable merit to get milked in the name of science. More >
  • This Is What Humans Would Look Like If We Could Withstand Car Wrecks

    Graham Has Issues

    There's something a bit grasshopper-like about Graham. This man-sized sculpture sports a head that melds right into his torso, which is supported by a pair of strong, springy legs. But Graham's ... More >
Kelsey D. Atherton
at 10:14 AM Jul 27 2016
Photo by Eric Summers, U.S. Air Force

At the best of times, military patrol duty is equally boring and important. Physically being in a place reminds others that the military is there, armed and ready to take action. It's a good way to watch a lot of space for signs of hostile activity, but it also commits a lot of people to the work of patrolling, and puts them at risk. What if, in many situations, a robot could do the actual driving around and watching part of patrolling, and armed troops could travel quickly into the danger when it arose?

Corey Mueller
at 10:14 AM Jul 27 2016
Screenshot

This year's Olympics, though plagued with Zika news, has actually produced interesting technological advances. High-tech gear is helping athletes go faster and farther and also helping to protect them. Now, some athletes are turning to a pair of headphones to help them improve their skills through brain stimulation.

Corey Mueller
at 10:14 AM Jul 27 2016
Facebook

From the day that Facebook announced its 360-degree camera, the Surround 360, it promised that the project would be open source. Today, they delivered -- sort of.

Mary Beth Griggs
at 10:14 AM Jul 27 2016
Nature // 

Ted Scambos has been studying our climate for well over 25 years — even venturing out on what might have been the slowest road trip ever across Antarctica to gather data. He is the lead scientist at the National Snow & Ice Data Center, and as he's gathered data and published papers over the years focused on our climate and climate change, he's been faced with a deluge of messages from climate change deniers.

Ryan F. Mandelbaum
at 10:14 AM Jul 27 2016
Impossible Foods
Science // 

I'm sorry, but burgers suck. Sure, juicy meat pucks may be among my favorite stomach stuffers, but meat has so many guilt-inducing problems. Are there any restaurants where I can ingest the greasy bovine disks I crave without killing cows, the environment and myself, all without forfeiting the beefy goodness? One joint is answering my prayers with a bloody veggie burger.

Meaghan Lee Callaghan
at 10:14 AM Jul 27 2016
© Karin Holser / National Geographic
Nature // 

Since the 1940s, Japanese whalers have spoken of a rare whale variety, a smaller and darker version of the Baird's beaked whale. They called the animal karasu, or raven, and said that you could only see them at the Namuro Strait between April and June.

Kelsey D. Atherton
at 10:14 AM Jul 27 2016
Screenshot by author, from YouTube

This flying machine can't properly be called a drone, as the pilot sits inside the vehicle. Yet the eight small rotors, the simple open-air construction, and vertical takeoff all make it seem drone-inspired. The Swedish maker behind the “amazingdiyprojects” Youtube channel built himself an eight-engined platform that flies. Like this:

Claire Maldarelli
at 10:14 AM Jul 27 2016
Sam Ward

The desire to enhance human beings past our mental and physical limits has a long history in science (and science fiction). But recent advances like the revolutionary genome editing tool CRISPR have brought the prospect of superhumans and designer babies into the spotlight.

Corey Mueller
at 10:14 AM Jul 27 2016
Screenshot
Gaming // 

Nintendo's next console, the Nintendo NX, will be a portable gaming system with detachable controllers, according to Eurogamer.

Thom Leavy
at 10:14 AM Jul 27 2016
Wikimedia Commons

Audiophiles and renewable energy wonks, rejoice. Arachnophobes, brace yourselves: recent studies published in Nature Materials may lead to spider silk inspired materials to manipulate sound and heat much as semiconductors manipulate electrons, according to Phys.org.

John Wilmes
at 10:14 AM Jul 27 2016

During the annual NBA Draft (which for 2016, concluded last month), teenagers become millionaires. They do this primarily with their bodies, which are measured and tested in the weeks surrounding their selection. But nowadays, the methods for evaluating burgeoning pro-basketball players' bodies are undergoing seismic shifts.

Meaghan Lee Callaghan
at 10:14 AM Jul 27 2016
Alfred Wegener Institut / Antje Wichels
Nature // 

In all our oceans, particles of broken-up plastic -- microplastic smaller than 5 millimeters in size -- float throughout, where they're known as a problem for animals that eat them.

Kate Baggaley
at 10:14 AM Jul 27 2016
Transport Accident Commission
Cars // 

There's something a bit grasshopper-like about Graham. This man-sized sculpture sports a head that melds right into his torso, which is supported by a pair of strong, springy legs. But Graham's fleshy, if oddly proportioned, body is definitely human. He's just better adapted to life on the roads than the rest of us.

Corey Mueller
at 09:34 AM Jul 26 2016
Screenshot

Today, Google announced a new open source project for what it deems "a key element for an immersive virtual reality experience": spatial audio. In other words, placing sound where it should be in three-dimensional space.

Kelsey D. Atherton
at 09:34 AM Jul 26 2016
Screenshot by author, from YouTube

There is more water than there are runways. For places that have access to the sea, or lakes, or large, calm rivers, it might be easier to use a seaplane than building a runway for a plane designed to land on, well, land. China's state media today announced the completion of the first AG600. It's the world's largest functional seaplane and made by China itself.

 
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