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  • Why the Soviet space shuttle was left to rot

    Why the Soviet space shuttle was left to rot

    Just before dawn on the morning of November 15, 1988, the Energiya rocket stood fueled and ready on the launch pad at Baikonur, the Soviet Union's launch site. Mated to the booster was the Buran ... More >
  • The Looming 8th Pandemic – Climate Change and Cholera

    The Looming 8th Pandemic

    Throughout history, only a few pathogens have made historical impacts on human health. One of these is cholera. Caused by the bacterium Vibrio cholerae this potentially fatal disease has ... More >
  • First Ever Glass Deposits Found On Martian Surface

    First Ever Glass Deposits Found On Martian Surface

    It seems like Mars has just about everything:auroras, water, and now... glass? More >
  • Apple Set To Take On Spotify With New Music Streaming Service

    Apple Set To Take On Spotify

    Apple just made itself relevant to music lovers—again. At its annual World Wide Developer Conference (WWDC) on Monday, the company announced a new streaming music service for the iPhone, ... More >
  • One-Armed Robot Beats Samurai In Sword Competition

    One-Armed Robot Beats Samurai

    For thousands of years, nothing on Earth was deadlier with a sword than a human. People have since largely moved on from slicing weapons to firearms and explosives, but the art of swordsmanship ... More >
Alexandra Ossola
at 10:51 AM Jul 7 2015
USDA

Dengue fever is so excruciating that it is often called the “bone breaker,” causing severe pain in the joints and abdomen, vomiting, and circulatory system failure. It's nearly impossible to treat, so the only way to cut down on incidences of the disease is to decrease the number of mosquitoes that carry it. One startling effective way to do that: genetically modifying mosquitos so their offspring won't survive. A year-long trial with genetically modified mosquitoes in northeast Brazil has been the most successful yet, reducing the population of the disease-carrying insects by 95 percent, according to a study published last week in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases.

Dave Gershgorn
at 10:36 AM Jul 7 2015
Google
Cars // 

With large tech companies like Google and Uber circling driverless cars, the conversation has mostly been one of “how soon can we do this?” and not “should we?” Of course, autonomous cars would be cool, but what are the advantages besides the obvious luxury of not needing an error-prone, human hand behind the wheel?

Alexandra Ossola
at 10:36 AM Jul 7 2015
University of Florida

If you've ever woken up with a weird headache and pain in your jaw during a particularly stressful time, it might be because you were grinding your teeth, a condition called bruxism. Don't worry, though, you're not alone—one in five of us does it. Now a team of researchers from the University of Florida has created an easier way to diagnose bruxism using a smart mouthguard.

Dave Gershgorn
at 10:36 AM Jul 7 2015
Gaming // 

If you get bored building the entirety of Westeros or the limited story options in Minecraft, your prayers have been answered. Minecraft, the game defined by its thriving 70,000,000+ community of builders, is adding a separate Story Mode game, where players will be able to navigate a traditional storyline developed by Telltale Games.

Levi Sharpe
at 10:36 AM Jul 7 2015
Deepdream Bot/ Twitter

Transport yourself to a magical land of slug people, dog monsters, and other psychedelic scenes as you scroll though the Deepdream bot Twitter feed. Be forewarned, a significant portion of your day may be lost.

Kelsey D. Atherton
at 10:36 AM Jul 7 2015
Suidobashi/YouTube
Robots // 

Last week, American giant robot makers Megabot challenged Japanese giant robot makers Suidobashi Heavy Industry to a giant robot battle. The video, subtitled in Japanese and filled with waving American flags, coincidentally happened to come out right before a striking Women's World Cup championship match where the U.S. handily beat the Japanese national team. Yesterday, Suidobashi Heavy Industries posted their response:

Alexandra Ossola
at 10:36 AM Jul 7 2015

In 2003, Carly Heyman fell ill with some bizarre symptoms. She was depressed, gained 50 pounds, would sleep all day but would wake up with a start from horrible nightmares and suicidal thoughts. Her parents took her to doctor after doctor, who would only treat the symptoms but couldn't identify the cause of her illness. After several years of this, a doctor finally diagnosed her with the rare genetic disorder Fragile X syndrome—all it took was a simple hormone patch to alleviate her symptoms.

Mary Beth Griggs
at 10:36 AM Jul 7 2015
Cars // 

In terms of iconic city sights, London's double-decker bus is right up there with Paris' Eiffel Tower. And with the Eiffel Tower adding wind turbines earlier this year, it's no surprise that London is also going green, but not with envy. Or paint either.

Kelsey D. Atherton
at 10:36 AM Jul 7 2015
NASA Illustration / Dennis Calaba
Drones // 

When it comes to exploring Mars, human-made robots have, literally and figuratively, only scratched the surface. To date, rovers on Mars have driven less than 65 km on the Red Planet. The surface of Mars is almost 145 million square km, and while satellites orbiting the planet like the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter have helped, there is still a lot of ground left to cover up close. One faster way to do that is a plane, and NASA has a concept for a Martian flyer that might work.

Dave Gershgorn
at 10:36 AM Jul 7 2015
NASA/ JPL/ USGS

In the depths of space, when even starlight can't be relied on, spacecraft need some form of long-lasting, chemical energy to endure potential decades without recharging.

Brooke Borel
at 12:05 PM Jul 1 2015

A MERS outbreak in South Korea has infected 181 people and killed 33. For an overview on the virus, check out this National Geographic piece, and to understand why it may have spread so quickly, here's an explanation from NPR's Goats and Soda.

Jason Tetro
at 12:05 PM Jul 1 2015
Source: Wikipedia
Fitness // 

In addition to water bottles, disinfectant spray bottles have become commonplace in many athletic facilities. The routine is simple to adopt; after you've used a piece of equipment, simply spray down the surfaces you've touched and give it a wipe.

Amy Shira Teitel
at 12:05 PM Jul 1 2015
Space // 

The Saturn V launches are the probably the most iconic launches of the Apollo era, a 363-foot rocket riding on a pillar of flames. But the Gemini launches were, in many ways, far more beautiful. The sleek Titan II missile launched the streamlined spacecraft into orbit on a clear flame. It also made a “bwooping” sound at the moment just before liftoff, a uniquely strange sound.

Sarah Fecht
at 12:05 PM Jul 1 2015
Space // 

After the explosion of SpaceX's Falcon 9 rocket on Sunday, the hunt is on to find out what went wrong. Although the company says it still isn't sure what the hell happened, the Air Force has just announced that its safety officers sent the command for the rocket to destroy itself--but that was long after it was already breaking apart from a malfunction, USA Today reports.

Mary Beth Griggs
at 12:05 PM Jul 1 2015
Science // 

Yes, there will be an extra second in the day, added in at midnight Coordinated Universal Time (UTC). Not that you noticed. It is just a second after all.

 
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