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  • What Sort Of Weapon Shot Down Flight MH-17?

    Which Weapon Shot Down Flight MH-17?

    Earlier today, Malaysia Airlines flight MH-17, flying from Amsterdam to Kuala Lumpur, was shot down over Eastern Ukraine, killing all 295 people on board. Following Ukraine's ouster ... More >
  • The US Air Force Is Working On A New Bomber

    The US Air Force Is Working On A New Bomber

    The U.S. Air Force is quietly ramping up spending on a future bomber, according to a report by the Congressional Research Service published earlier this month. The Air Force also sent ... More >
  • Five Questions About The Smallpox Vials Found In Maryland

    Should We Worry About That Smallpox?

    Earlier this week, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced something surprising: Federal researchers discovered six 60-year-old vials with smallpox virus in them. The vials ... More >
  • Meet The Scientist Who Might End The Climate Culture Wars

    Can This Scientist End The Climate Culture Wars?

    Texas Tech professor Katharine Hayhoe is among the American Geophysical Union's 2014 award-winners for science communication, announced on July 3. "She's someone who has been tireless in having ... More >
  • First Exoskeleton Gets FDA Approval For US Sales

    First Exosekelton Approved for Sale

    A motorized exoskeleton, designed to help paralyzed people walk again, just earned U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval. It is the first such device to do so. The device, called ReWalk, ... More >
Emily Gertz
at 12:05 PM Jul 26 2014
CountyLemonade on Flickr, CC by 2.0
Cars // 

What if your car could sense when you were falling asleep behind the wheel, and wake you up before you caused an accident? That's the notion around a sensor device being developed by Harken, a public-private European consortium.

Kelsey D. Atherton
at 12:05 PM Jul 26 2014
Yinan Chen, via Wikimedia Commons
Drones // 

Here's a roundup of the week's top drone news: the military, commercial, non-profit, and recreational applications of unmanned aircraft.

Emily Gertz
at 12:05 PM Jul 26 2014
Wikimedia Commons
Nature // 

If you're not worried about a future without toro sushi or rare tuna steaks, you probably should be. Five of the eight species of this tasty marine predator are endangered, according to the International Union for the Conservation of Nature, source of the Red List of threatened species. In January 2013 an international group of fisheries researchers told the world (PDF) that Pacific bluefin tuna had been fished to their lowest levels in history, with the population near to collapsing as a commercial stock.

Francie Diep
at 12:05 PM Jul 26 2014
KENPEI on Wikimedia Commons
Nature // 

Following the meltdown at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, monkeys living in nearby forests have been found to have lowered blood cell counts, according to a new study. What that means for people living—or who once lived—in the area is unclear.

Douglas Main
at 12:05 PM Jul 26 2014
MIT
Tech // 

The researchers don't claim the device could be used to create electricity, at least not yet. But it could relatively easily be scaled up to make fresh water out of salt water via distillation, for example, or to sterilize medical or food-processing equipment in areas of the world where electricity is hard to come by, said MIT researcher Hadi Ghasemi in a statement.

Francie Diep
at 12:05 PM Jul 26 2014
Hanwha Eagles
Robots // 

The Hanwha Eagles of Daejeon, Korea, have been on a long losing streak, the BBC reports… but they are winners in our hearts here at Popular Science. That's because they have decided to amp up their fans by giving them access to three rows of telepresence robotsNot able to score a ticket to an Eagles game? No problem. These robots will be able to cheer, chant, show the faces of remote fans on their own screen faces, and hold up LED panels showing encouraging texts from fans.

Neel V. Patel
at 12:05 PM Jul 26 2014
NIAID/Flickr

Yesterday, Chinese authorities finally lifted a nine-day quarantine of 151 individuals from the northwestern city of Yumen, instituted after a 38-year-old man died of a bubonic plague infection last week. Entry and exit points were also sealed off, trapping nearly 30,000 residents. In the end, no other cases of bubonic plague developed.

Kelsey D. Atherton
at 12:04 PM Jul 26 2014
Chief Yeoman Alphonso Braggs, US-Navy via Wikimedia Commons
Nature // 

Polar bears are the largest land predators in the world. Confined to arctic climes, they are huge, powerful swimmers, and deadly hunters. In addition to being the second-best bear, they risk going extinct from global warming's environmental changes. Thanks to an offering by a luxury cruise line, customers can take a cruise through the newly navigable arctic, and try to see polar bears struggling to stay alive on what remains of Arctic ice. 

Francie Diep
at 12:04 PM Jul 26 2014
D. L. Hendrickson
Science // 

150,000: the number of weather observations that have been recorded by a 101-year-old farmer, the U.S. National Weather Service's longest-serving volunteer, who has called in temperatures, rainfall and other measurements from his home for 84 years.

Lindsay Handmer
at 14:16 PM Jul 25 2014
Sunswift
Tech // 

On Wednesday the 23rd of July, a team of UNSW students successfully attempted to break a 26 year old world speed record for the fastest electric vehicle over 500 kilometres. The team broke the record, but is still waiting for final approval from the world Motorsport governing body, FIA. The car averaged a speed of more than 100 km/h during the attempt, beating the previous world record of 73 km/h.

Lindsay Handmer
at 13:52 PM Jul 25 2014
National Geographic Doomsday Preppers
Science // 

US based Mad Scientist Nick Klein built the poop powered flame thrower for the National Geographic's show Doomsday Preppers. Impressively the device can shoot flames up to 10 meters but probably doesn't smell too good. While environmentally friendly as far as flame throwers go, how and why does one build a poo powered flame cannon?

Lindsay Handmer
at 09:18 AM Jul 25 2014
Tetrix Tetrix, Semipalatinsk Polygon Expedition 2008
Science // 

Nuclear bombs are seen as weapons of mass destruction, but some scientists imagined their use for good. Controlled explosions could be used to divert rivers, dig reservoirs, drill for oil and even create natural harbours. Located in Kazakhstan, Lake Chagan was one of these tests, performed by the Soviet Union in 1965. A 408m wide, 100m deep crater created with a 140 kiloton nuclear explosion. But would you really want to swim in it?

Francie Diep
at 06:27 AM Jul 25 2014
DARPA

So DARPA wants a reusable spaceplane. I mean, who doesn't? For decades, space experts have tried to design quick-turnover, reusable launch systems. So far, however, no one has made one that works. "There really isn't any kind of vehicle today that does exactly what they're asking people to do," Micah Walter-Range, director of research and analysis at the Space Foundation, tells Popular Science. "You can certainly compare it to existing vehicles, but it seems to be a new class." 

Francie Diep
at 06:27 AM Jul 25 2014
NCAA

When the paperwork at your doctor's office asks you how much alcohol you drink, do you write down the truth? Would you be more likely to tell the truth if an animated head interviewed you instead? One team of U.S. military psychologists is betting you would.

Douglas Main
at 06:27 AM Jul 25 2014
Rod Dillon
Nature // 

No human would be inclined to think favorably of leishmaniasis, caused by a parasite spread by sand flies, which infects about 12 million people worldwide and kills 20,000 to 30,000 per year

 
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