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  • Tesla's Big Announcement Is PowerWall: A Battery For Your Home

    PowerWall: A Battery For Your Home

    Could a battery big enough to power your whole home be coming to market soon? Yes, says Elon Musk. More than that, he says it will change the world. Rumors have swirled for weeks about a new ... More >
  • Blue Origin's Rocket Flies 58 Miles High [Video]

    The Latest Private Rocket Launch!

    New Shepard--the primary rocket from Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos' private spaceflight venture, Blue Origin--flew a successful test flight yesterday. It climbed 307,000 feet, or 58 miles high, and did so ... More >
  • Watch Pluto And Its Moon Rotate Around A Center Of Mass [Video]

    Watch Pluto and Charon Orbit Each Other [GIF]

    Dwarf planet Pluto is coming into view. And we're already discovering a few exciting things about this mysterious little space rock. More >
  • Secret Air Force Space Plane Gets Darth Vader-Style Engine

    Secret Space Plane Gets Darth Vader's Engine

    The Air Force's secret robot space plane is going to try out a new engine. The X-37B has so far spent a total of 1367 days tooling around in Earth's orbit, doing classified things. Yesterday, the ... More >
  • Watch Thermal Video Of A Lithium-Ion Battery Exploding

    Watch This Li-Ion Battery Explode!

    This Friday, Europe's largest freight carrier, Cargolux, will ban bulk shipments of lithium-ion batteries from its freight planes. Last month, an international group of airplane manufacturers ... More >
Kelsey D. Atherton
at 09:33 AM May 5 2015
AirMap
Drones // 

Bought a drone, and want to fly it legally, but have no idea where to do that? A new map created by drone hobbyists and enthusiasts aims to be an atlas, laying out the legal landscape for piloting unmanned vehicles. Called simply AirMap, the project is a collaboration between Ben Marcus, who created the NoFlyZone registry for people who don't want drones buzzing around their houses, and Gregory McNeal, a professor of law and public policy at Pepperdine. Available now in beta form, the AirMap takes user input and regulation changes into account, creating a durable map of which sections of sky are currently safe and legal for drones to fly in.

Jeffrey Lin and P.W. Singer
at 09:32 AM May 5 2015
weibo.com

The J-11D Flanker fighter is the latest Flanker variant, and with an AESA radar, may be even more advanced that its Russian counterpart, the Su-35.

Dan Moren
at 09:32 AM May 5 2015
Gadgets // 

Airline travel can often feel like a game of roulette when it comes to your luggage: It gets lost, misrouted, or even confused for someone else's suitcase. But a collaboration between technology giant Samsung and luggage purveyor Samsonite could put an end to that, thanks to the same technology utilized in our smartphones.

Alexandra Ossola
at 09:32 AM May 5 2015

Cervical cancer kills about 4,000 women per year. Although those numbers are lower than they have been in the past, almost all of these deaths are entirely preventable. Cervical cancer is cased by certain strains of the human papillomavirus, or HPV, which is transmitted by sexual contact, causing normal cells to become cancerous over time. Cervical cancer has become much less deadly in recent years, due, in part, to more frequent and sophisticated screening methods. But according to a new study from the American College of Physicians, too frequent screenings for low-risk patients can cause more harm than good.

Kelsey D. Atherton
at 09:32 AM May 5 2015
NASA Langley/Gary Banziger

This is no garage-built hotrod. NASA's Greased Lightning, a 10-engine tilt-wing airplane, successfully completed a mid-air switcheroo from vertical, helicopter-like takeoff to level, airplane-like flight, and then back to vertical for the landing. It's as systematic, hydromatic, and ultramatic as a tilt-wing drone can get.

Alexandra Ossola
at 09:32 AM May 5 2015

Men with beards know that their facial hair can do more than just keep their faces warm in the winter. Beards can show how manly you are or save crumbs from your lunch. Hoping to get an even closer look at the inside of men's whiskers, last week, an intrepid news team in Albuquerque, New Mexico swabbed a few men's beards to see just what kinds of bacteria were living in them.

Mary Beth Griggs
at 09:32 AM May 5 2015
Nature // 

Want to know a secret? First, knock on wood, and whatever you do, don't tell the hurricanes, ok? This news might inspire them to pick up the pace, and we wouldn't want that.

Dan Moren
at 09:32 AM May 5 2015
SmartPlate
Fitness // 

Calorie counting has been helped a lot by the sharp uptick in personal technology, and one team wants to make the process even easier by swapping out your ordinary china with its new SmartPlate.

Alexandra Ossola
at 09:32 AM May 5 2015

Over the past few years, research and some high-profile incidents have illuminated the harmful long-term effects that concussions can have on football players' brains. Repeated head injuries can lead to personality changes, memory loss, speech problems, and rapid neurological degeneration. Football concussions are on the rise, and they don't just happen to the pros--younger athletes get them, too, starting from their first peewee league. And according to a study published today in JAMA Pediatrics, concussions aren't just happening during game time--high school and college players actually had a higher number of concussions during practices.

Kelsey D. Atherton
at 09:32 AM May 5 2015
Patrick McKay, via Wikimedia Commons CC BY-SA 3.0
Drones // 

Like trying to map the clouds, the legal and regulatory landscape of unmanned aerial vehicles in the United States is subject to frequent change. Projects like AirMap are attempting to map that world, but it's new changes from the FAA that might clear the runway for drone users.

Alexandra Ossola
at 10:37 AM May 4 2015
Patrick Hoesly on Flickr
Science // 

One minute the mouse was starving, and the next it turned away from its food, leaving it untouched. Its sudden bursts of activity were counteracted with just as sudden bouts of lethargy. This mouse was acting strange, and it wasn't by accident--it was because scientists made it behave that way.

Mary Beth Griggs
at 10:37 AM May 4 2015
Tesla
Energy // 

Could a battery big enough to power your whole home be coming to market soon? Yes, says Elon Musk. More than that, he says it will change the world. Rumors have swirled for weeks about a new announcement from Tesla, with onlookers around the world latching onto any crumb of information from the electric car company. CEO Elon Musk kept the suspense level high, promising that on Thursday he would reveal 'The Missing Piece' of the energy equation.

Kelsey D. Atherton
at 10:36 AM May 4 2015
Screenshot by author, from YouTube
Drones // 

Graffiti by drone was supposed to be a bad joke. Despite a ban on drones from this year's South by Southwest convention, a remote-control vandalism machine made its way to the show. Now, someone has used a drone to scrawl a tag across a billboard in New York. Welcome to vandalism's most complicated, least exciting era.

Kelsey D. Atherton
at 10:36 AM May 4 2015
Zanastardust, via Wikimedia Commons
Science // 

The world of Middle Earth, as portrayed in the Lord of the Rings books and films, is known mainly for its inhospitability. Giant spiders, orc hordes, ringwraiths on horseback, and terrifying monstrosities of shadow and flame in the depths of caverns all make for a pretty unpleasant environment. As the books tell, it's also a great setting for adventurers, who tirelessly cross the world to fight these monsters and others. A study by Richard Walker and Alice Cooper-Dunn, published in the Journal of Interdisciplinary Science Topics, asks if the oxygen content of Middle Earth may allow greater feats of adventuring than our atmosphere does.

Sarah Fecht
at 10:36 AM May 4 2015
Photograph by Sam Kaplan

Thanks to new genetic engineering techniques, we can edit DNA with more precision than ever before. This technology has the potential to change whether a baby lives or dies, but it also carries with it a lot of unanswered scientific and ethical questions, such as the possibility of one day creating "designer babies".

 
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