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  • When we finally go to Mars, we might end up living in giant metal cans

    Go to Mars, Live in a Can

    If humans are ever really going to make it to Mars, we're going to need a bigger boat. Today's spaceships are built for short hauls to and from the International Space Station, a mere six or so ... More >
  • NASA's newly released video archives contain a skyfull of goodies

    NASA's Video Archives: Crack for Space-Fans

    NASA is forever linked to space, a plucky government agency bravely hurtling people and robots into the great beyond. Yet the agency has always had as much of an earth-bound mission as an outer ... More >
  • How fentanyl is making deadly drugs even deadlier

    Is Fear of Fentanyl Justified? Yes.

    It's relatively new to America's drug scene, but in the last few years, its victims have included everyone from musician Prince to a 10-year-old boy in Miami. The culprit is fentanyl, a lesser-know... More >
  • Doctors are wearing the new Google Glass while seeing patients

    Who Still Uses Google Glass? Doctors.

    You could be forgiven for assuming that Glass, Google's head-mounted augmented-reality device, had been effectively dead since 2015. But as Google's sister company X, the Moonshot Factory, ... More >
  • Ravens are so smart it's actually kind of disconcerting, new study finds

    Ravens Are Scary-Smart

    A flock of ravens ravaging a carcass may technically be called an unkindness, but the real unkindness is using that term. Everyone is always hating on the smarty pants, but ravens are not ... More >
Sara Chodosh
at 09:36 AM Aug 22 2017
Pixabay
Space // 

A syzygy feels magical, and not just because it gets you at least 25 points in Scrabble. The whole concept of celestial bodies aligning feels poetic. When it results in a total solar eclipse here on Earth, you can feel for a few moments as though you're part of something much greater and grander than yourself. The transience only makes it more beautiful. Which is why thousands of people will flock to the path of totality on August 21, 2017: to witness a once-in-a-lifetime phenomenon.

Jeffrey Lin and P.W. Singer
at 09:36 AM Aug 22 2017
China Nuclear Group

You know that thing where Australians don't want nuclear reactors built in our own backyard? Yeah, China doesn't have that. It's well on its way to becoming a world leader in nuclear power; its 37 reactors are already producing 32.4 gigawatts of electricity, and more than 20 more reactors are currently under construction

Cassidy Mayeda
at 09:36 AM Aug 22 2017
Pixabay

The shivers, the shakes, the chills—we've all experienced a fever at one time or another. When we take our temperatures and the thermometer reads anything above 99 degrees, many of us immediately believe we are afflicted with some kind of infectious microbe. But, in fact, having a fever doesn't always signal infection. Yes, contagions like strep throat or the flu, are the most common reason for an elevated temperature, but it's surely not the only one. More uncommon ailments like brain injury, reactions to legal and illegal drugs, and even cancer can raise your body temperature above its natural level. But don't freak out, yet. Knowing what the causes are and how they can occur can help you make the most informed decision about your elevated body temperature.

Mary Beth Griggs
at 09:36 AM Aug 22 2017
Pixabay
Space // 

Imagine. You are an ancient human and your reliable and faithful sun suddenly and unexpectedly goes dark. This terrifies you. You think, 'What if it never comes back? Oh gods, WHAT HAVE WE DONE TO DESER...oh, it's back. Phew.' But then, over the years, it keeps happening. You begin to lose trust in the sun's loyalty and start recording when these events happen. Centuries go by and eventually enough of a pattern has built up that early civilizations are able to predict when these crazy events might occur.

Marlene Cimons
at 09:36 AM Aug 22 2017
Pexels
Science // 

You already know your cat and/or dog walks around leaving its own carbon footprint, and you probably have some idea that a Western dog pollutes more than a Bangladeshi family. Now witness the true scale of the problem!

Kelsey D. Atherton
at 12:34 PM Aug 18 2017
Jamey Jacob
Drones // 

When the sun disappears behind the moon on Monday, scientists will be ready. The astrophysics of the eclipse are known, so for space watchers it will be a time to relax and partake in the strange beauty of day gone suddenly dark. For the atmospheric scientist however, the eclipse provides a shining opportunity to directly study how the sun influences weather patterns by heating the atmosphere. To that end, a team of researchers from Oklahoma State University and the University of Nebraska is going to spend Monday tracking changes in the atmosphere in the path of the eclipse. And to get just how the eclipse changes the weather in the low sky, the team will fly drones during the totality.

Kendra Pierre-Louis
at 12:34 PM Aug 18 2017
Depositphotos
Science // 

Your bartender was right, according to a study released today in the journal Scientific Reports. When it comes to whiskey, a touch of dilution improves the solution. Diluting your whiskey with water makes it more flavorful, especially if it's Scotch.

Sara Chodosh
at 12:34 PM Aug 18 2017
Pixabay

Look, do what you want with your pubic hair. Shave it off, give it a coconut oil hair mask, braid it, bedazzle it, whatever. Do what makes you feel good. But for heaven's sake, be safe when you're doing it.

Mary Beth Griggs
at 12:34 PM Aug 18 2017
NASA
Space // 

I have a confession to make: I may not go see the total eclipse. And one way or another, I've decided to stop agonizing over that decision. It's really not a big deal.

Jeremy Deaton
at 12:34 PM Aug 18 2017
Pixabay
Science // 

Henry David Thoreau once said that a glass of beer would “naturalize a man at once — which would make him see green, and, if he slept, dream that he heard the wind sough among the pines.”

Mary Beth Griggs
at 12:34 PM Aug 18 2017
ESO/GASP Collaboration
Nature // 

Our galaxy, the Milky Way, is a barred-spiral, making its way through space like a twirling baton with streamers on each end, carefree. It's a shape that we all know and love. Nothing wrong with that, barred spirals are great. But other galactic shapes are far more mysterious and intriguing to astronomers.

Sara Chodosh
at 12:34 PM Aug 18 2017
Pixabay

There's a decent chance you'll get some kind of cancer at some point. If you're a man, your odds are one in two. If you're a woman, one in three. Your risk of dying from cancer is only slightly lower: one in four and one in five, respectively.

Jeffrey Lin and P.W. Singer
at 12:34 PM Aug 18 2017
Xigexi

Part of the reason we take our (or at least, the US's) technological superiority for granted, when it comes to military gear, is aircraft carriers. The US has 10 proper ones, 9 sort-of ones, and everyone else has, well, they do their best. Now China is starting to do better.

Mary Beth Griggs
at 12:34 PM Aug 18 2017
Pixabay

If you can send a spacecraft to the moon and loop around our natural satellite one time, or—even better—gently set a rover down on the lunar surface, there could be money in it for you. $4.75 million, to be precise.

Rob Verger
at 12:34 PM Aug 18 2017
SpaceX

On Monday, at 12:31 pm Eastern time, a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket lifted off on a resupply flight for the International Space Station, and among its cargo, in addition to ice cream, was something else very cool: a supercomputer.

 
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