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  • Is NASA Going To Let The Hubble Telescope Burn?

    Is NASA Going To Let The Hubble Telescope Burn?

    Last month, six astronauts convened in New York City to discuss STS-125, the last mission to the Hubble Space Telescope, which happened in 2009. As it approached its 20th birthday, the telescope ... More >
  • SpaceX Is Looking For A Farmer

    SpaceX Is Looking For A Farmer

    Are you a farmer with galactic ambition? Does the agrarian life lack that aerospace sheen? Or do you just wish your career path looked a bit more like Matthew McConaughey's in the movie Interstellar? More >
  • Japan's Asteroid-Bombing Spacecraft Launches Successfully

    Japan probes asteroid

    Today, the Japanese Space Agency (JAXA) launched Hayabusa 2, a deep space probe that will land on asteroid 1999 JU3, collect samples, and bring them back to Earth. More >
  • Is Depression An Infectious Disease?

    Is Depression An Infectious Disease?

    Mental health continues to be one of society's greatest concerns. Its enigmatic nature leaves both the public and the health professional in a quandary to understand not only the cause but also ... More >
  • Data From Satellites Confirm: Glaciers Are Retreating

    Glaciers are, in fact, retreating

    Glaciers are having a hard time all around the world. A new book outlines the findings of a years-long effort by researchers and research groups across the world. Titled Global Land Ice Measurement... More >
mdepaula
at 10:11 AM Dec 20 2014
Toyota
Cars // 

The most remarkable thing about the first hydrogen fuel cell vehicle that you can buy outright is how unremarkable it is to drive.

logru712
at 10:11 AM Dec 20 2014
NASA

The planet Venus, named for the Roman goddess of Love, certainly wouldn't be a very loving place to live. On the surface, Venus hosts scorching temperatures of more than 800 degrees Fahrenheit, a heat capable of melting lead, as well as an atmospheric pressure 92 times greater than Earth's. That's the same kind of pressure found at nearly 3,000 feet below the ocean's surface.

brookeborel
at 10:11 AM Dec 20 2014

You've heard the statistics: the world population may hit between 9 and 12 billion within the century. The middle class is especially growing fast, and will likely continue to demand more meat and dairy, which take more energy to make compared to plant-based staples. The big question is: how are we going to feed all those people?

LindseyKratochwill
at 10:11 AM Dec 20 2014
Nature // 

All hail the world's deepest dwelling fish.

AthertonKD
at 10:11 AM Dec 20 2014
DARPA

Since the first gun appeared on a battlefield, bullets have dealt death in straight lines. As the shortest distance between two points, lines are great, but they mean enemies can hide behind walls or buildings and not get hit, a clearly undesirable prospect for anyone in the business of shooting enemies. Now, the Department of Defense is testing a bullet that can change direction in mid-air.

sarahfecht
at 10:11 AM Dec 20 2014
Science // 

In the old days, the battle between condiments was fought by Hellmann's Mayonnaise and Miracle Whip. That was mostly a debate about taste rather than substance. Nowadays, vegan mayonnaise that uses plant ingredients instead of eggs is shaking up the world of sandwich slathers. One brand in particular, Hampton Creek's "Just Mayo" has drawn the wrath of food giant Unilever, maker of Hellmann's. (In 2013, Popular Science gave Hampton Creek a Best Of What's New award for their eco-friendly eggless eggs.)

Paul Adams
at 10:11 AM Dec 20 2014

Earlier this week, roughly 50,000 Skype users woke up to a new way of communicating over the Web-based phone- and video-calling platform, a feature that could've been pulled straight out of Star Trek. The new function, called Skype Translator, translates voice calls between different languages in realtime, turning English to Spanish and Spanish back into English on the fly. Skype plans to incrementally add support for more than 40 languages, promising nothing short of a universal translator for desktops and mobile devices.

AthertonKD
at 10:11 AM Dec 20 2014
OC Robotics, YouTube Screenshot
Robots // 

This slithering, contortionist robot is named the “Series II - X125 system.” The robot snake-arm is over 7 feet long, and can carry over 13 pounds. It has a flexible tip, and can bend over 225 degrees. In the video, it appears to also have a camera and a flashlight.

fcdiep
at 10:19 AM Dec 19 2014
3D Systems
Robots // 

You should see this dog run. Derby was born with deformed front legs, but recently received a pair of 3D printed prosthetics, which he is quite good at maneuvering in:

dmoren
at 10:19 AM Dec 19 2014
CellScope

Is there anything that's worse than having a child who might be suffering from an ear infection? (Other, of course, than being said child.) A new device hopes to make those cases easier to diagnose by taking advantage of the powers of your smartphone.

THESUREHOUSE
at 10:19 AM Dec 19 2014
SURE house
Nature // 

We've all gotten the memo: climate change is real and it's happening. That means we have to adapt to it while working to fix it. Our contribution to the cause is the SURE HOUSE, a SUstainable and REsilient prototype representing a new direction in coastal housing.

davemosher
at 10:19 AM Dec 19 2014
Copyright Eric Adams

High above rural Arkansas, I'm jammed in the back of a small four-seat airplane. Andrew Barker pilots the aircraft while Austin Meyer sits beside him. Everything is going great—until the engine suddenly quits at 5,000 feet.

AthertonKD
at 10:19 AM Dec 19 2014
Edward Guttierrez III, U.S. Navy Photo

Last week, a new U.S. Navy robot swam near the Joint Expeditionary Base near Norfolk, Virginia. The robot is known by two names that run the gamut from Pixar-cuddly to over-the-top action movie. Project Nemo, a.k.a. GhostSwimmer, is a tuna-inspired bot that might protect soldiers in the future by going where humans can't or shouldn't.

Amy Shira Teitel
at 10:19 AM Dec 19 2014
NASA

When Gordon Cooper and Pete Conrad launched aboard Gemini V on August 21, 1965, they were the first astronauts to have mission patches sewn into their suits, a patch depicting a covered wagon. The motto of “8 days or bust,” however, had been nixed by NASA management; they worried it would make a shortened mission look like a failure. But the mission managed the full eight days, but it was probably as fun as traversing the country in a covered wagon. The view, on the other hand, was spectacular.

Paul Adams
at 10:19 AM Dec 19 2014
courtesy Propeller Health

The inhaler's sensor uses Bluetooth to connect to a smartphone or a data hub that plugs into a wall. One in 12 adults has asthma, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's 2010 report.

 
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