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  • Can There Really Be A Planet In Our Solar System That We Don't Know About?

    Could There Really Be a Ninth Planet?

    Scientists have long suspected that our solar system might harbor a hidden planet. Now, after decades of searching, they may be on to something. More >
  • It's Official: 2015 The Warmest Year In Recorded History

    2015 Was The Warmest Year Ever

    The envelope, please. There are so many great nominees, but there can only be one winner. The year with the record-setting highest temperature goes to...2015! We all knew you were headed for ... More >
  • This Robot Just Built A Launch Pad

    This Robot Just Built A Launch Pad

    Humans have never built another structure on another planet. So far, everything hurled beyond our atmosphere and into the great beyond was constructed on Earth, made by human hands or human-built ... More >
  • Giant Megacopter Drone Lifts Weights, Sets Record

    Giant Megacopter Drone Lifts Weights, Sets Record

    When it comes to setting new world records, sometimes the key is just finding a task that hasn't been done before. “Fastest human in the 100 meter dash” is a record first set in the ... More >
  • The Human Brain Could Store 10 Times More Memories Than Previously Thought

    Brains Could Store 10x More Memories Than We Thought

    Like computers, our brains have an impressive capacity to store memories. Scientists have long known that the brain stores memories as patterns of electrical pulses that move through and between ... More >
Alexandra Ossola
at 11:29 AM Feb 12 2016

Around 60,000 years ago, modern humans left Africa to begin exploring other continents. Along the way they met other early humans, such as Neanderthals, and the different species periodically bred together. Scientists have known this for a few years—there's evidence in our DNA, of which 1.5 to 4 percent in modern Europeans and Asians is Neanderthal. But scientists never knew if those bits of genetic code had a lasting effect on our health. After analyzing specific parts of DNA in 28,000 people, a team led by researchers at Vanderbilt University discovered correlations between Neanderthal DNA and 12 different health conditions, including depression and disorders of the skin and blood. The researchers published their work today in the journal Science.

Carl Franzen
at 11:29 AM Feb 12 2016
Science // 

HBO's Silicon Valley is the best comedy about the tech industry in recent years (sorry Big Bang Theory — but not really). Actually, I would go as far as to say that Silicon Valley, created by former tech drone Mike Judge (of Office Space, Idiocracy and Beavis and Butthead fame), is actually one of the best comedies overall on TV these days. And now it's returning for a glorious third season on April 24.

Jason Lederman
at 11:28 AM Feb 12 2016
Bill Bourne/ Popular Science archives

Today, February 11, 2016, LIGO scientists announced they had detected gravitational waves in September 2015—the first direct evidence of the cosmic inflation that created our universe. "The Tantalizing Quest For Gravity Waves," written by Arthur Fisher and originally published in the April 1981 issue of Popular Science, explores the international effort to detect these ripples in space-time.

Mary Beth Griggs
at 11:28 AM Feb 12 2016

That hop across the pond is about to get longer. A new paper published in Environmental Research Letters finds that climate change could make flying even worse.

Kelsey D. Atherton
at 11:28 AM Feb 12 2016
Keith A. Stevenson, USMC, via Wikimedia Commons

Situated behind a mall and next to an open pit of a construction site, the northern Virginia headquarters of DARPA, the military's most forward-looking appendage, aren't so much nondescript as they are deliberately non-assuming--a shrine to technological triumph glistening like the infinite offices of suburbia. Inside, I joined a dozen or so other reporters for a meeting with DARPA director Arati Prabhakar and Steve Walker, DARPA's deputy director. We were invited here to discuss a very elaborate game of guesswork: what threats will emerge in the future, and what investments now can protect against them?

Kelsey D. Atherton
at 11:28 AM Feb 12 2016
DARPA
Drones // 

DARPA is the Pentagon's future-looking technology projects wing, and it's also the world's foremost source of bad pun acronyms for military machines. Even if the President is turning down Death Stars, there's still plenty more of the future to mine for upcoming wars. At a media roundtable in northern Virginia yesterday, DARPA director Dr. Arati Prabhakar and deputy director Dr. Steve Walker gave a glimpse of something new and strange: on April 7th, they'll be christening a new ship that's 132 feet long and features an onboard crew of exactly zero people.

Sarah Fecht
at 11:28 AM Feb 12 2016
Paper Magazine/Photoshopped by Popular Science

Scientists have finally detected a phenomenon predicted by Einstein 100 years ago, and the news is exploding across Twitter and Facebook.

Sarah Fecht
at 11:28 AM Feb 12 2016
Sketchfab

Einstein was right. A hundred years ago, he predicted that really big objects in space can create ripples in the fabric of space-time. Today, scientists announced that these gravitational waves have been detected directly for the first time.

Chad Hanna / The Conversation
at 11:28 AM Feb 12 2016
SXS, CC BY-ND

The best thing about a day in my life on the lookout for gravitational waves is that I never know when it will begin.

Jason Lederman
at 11:28 AM Feb 12 2016

On Thursday, the scientists at LIGO announced they'd officially found gravitational waves. This truly is a remarkable discovery, and confirms the final piece of Einstein's general theory of relativity. Read more about the announcement, and what it means for science, here. And check out our gravitational waves explainer for more background on this scientific phenomenon.

Mary Beth Griggs
at 11:28 AM Feb 12 2016

The band Ok Go is renowned for its amazing music videos, and today's glorious video for its song, "Upside Down and Inside Out" is no exception. The band takes to the sky, experiencing weightlessness in the belly of a jet. And of course, no Ok Go video would be the same without the amazing props, from paint-filled balloons to piñatas, and even ball-filled suitcases.

Carl Franzen
at 11:27 AM Feb 12 2016
SXS, CC BY-ND

"Chirp!" That's the sound of the long-sought gravitational waves, ripples in the fabric of spacetime, according to an announcement today from scientists working on the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) experiment.

Alexandra Ossola
at 11:27 AM Feb 12 2016

Despite efforts to make it something people actually want to use, the condom hasn't changed much in the past few decades. Now researchers in Australia have discovered a compound derived from wild grasses that can make latex condoms significantly thinner that are just as strong and flexible, according to a press release from the University of Queensland and reported by Gizmodo.

Sophie Bushwick
at 11:27 AM Feb 12 2016
R. Hurt - Caltech/JPL

For months, the science world has been buzzing about the rumor that gravitational waves, the ripples in spacetime that Einstein predicted a hundred years ago, have finally been detected. Today, at press conferences all over the world, researchers at the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) confirmed that the hype is true.

Xavier Harding
at 11:27 AM Feb 12 2016
Games For Change
Gaming // 

Learning to code is increasingly becoming an important part of education in the 21st century. Knowing the basics of code is nearly as important in the world of the web as knowing one's ABC's. But in the world we live in, new apps and games release constantly—there's almost no time for teachers to keep students current while simultaneously teaching old, but necessary, lessons. That's what Games For Change hopes to address.

 
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