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  • Is Depression An Infectious Disease?

    Is Depression An Infectious Disease?

    Mental health continues to be one of society's greatest concerns. Its enigmatic nature leaves both the public and the health professional in a quandary to understand not only the cause but also ... More >
  • Data From Satellites Confirm: Glaciers Are Retreating

    Glaciers are, in fact, retreating

    Glaciers are having a hard time all around the world. A new book outlines the findings of a years-long effort by researchers and research groups across the world. Titled Global Land Ice Measurement... More >
  • How To Give A Mouse Ebola

    How To Give A Mouse Ebola

    If you give a lab mouse the mouse version of Ebola, it will die. But not in the same way humans with Ebola do. Lab mice infected with Ebola don't get hemorrhagic fever. They don't form tiny clots ... More >
  • The Co-Robots In 'Interstellar' Are Gorgeous--And Silly

    What the Heck is a Co-Robot?

    When humans finally set foot on an alien world, they’ll be joined by robots. That’s not a bold prediction. It’s a statement of the obvious. Machines have already beat us to Mars ... More >
  • Interstellar Travel Won't Look Anything Like The Movie

    Interstellar Travel Won't Look Like The Movie

    Christopher Nolan's Interstellar imagines a human journey to planets beyond our star. But that kind of trip would seem impossible in today's terms. Fortunately, a DARPA-funded task ... More >
Paul Adams
at 08:00 AM Nov 28 2014
Barry E. Wilmore, special to Popular Science

Hurtling around the Earth at nearly five miles per second, some 205 miles above where you might be sitting right now, crewmembers aboard the International Space Station plan to celebrate Thanksgiving in many of traditional ways that you or I might—only the turkey won't be roasted, and the football may be floating.

fcdiep
at 07:59 AM Nov 28 2014
Courtesy of the Library of Congress, LC-USZ62-30750
Science // 

Benjamin Franklin's famous kite-flying experiment, conducted in 1752, was not his first study with electricity. Before that, he tested electric shocks on some farmyard birds. As he wrote to botanist Peter Collinson in a letter dated 1749, "A Turky is to be killed for our Dinners by the Electrical Shock; and roasted by the electrical Jack, before a Fire kindled by the Electrified Bottle . . . ."

dmoren
at 09:18 AM Nov 27 2014
Mechanic Advisor
Gadgets // 

Despite my fondness for (and previous career in) computer troubleshooting, I find myself at sea when it comes to dealing with my car. But fortunately pretty much every car has a computer in it these days, and that onboard system can provide a first step to diagnosing a problem—all you need is the right tool.

fcdiep
at 09:18 AM Nov 27 2014
Macy's, Inc.
Science // 

They're cute and fat and take real engineering to get up into the air. I'm talking about the iconic balloons in the proud US tradition of Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade, which starts at 9:00 a.m. ET Thursday.

Rafi Letzter
at 09:18 AM Nov 27 2014
State of Missouri v. Darren Wilson
Science // 

This week, a grand jury elected not to indict a white police officer who shot and killed an unarmed black teenager.

AthertonKD
at 09:18 AM Nov 27 2014
Lockheed Martin
Drones // 

Based at times in Area 51, the U-2 spyplane tested the very limits of human endurance and Cold War technology when it first flew in 1955. Pilots would fly the high-altitude spy craft at above 70,000 feet for hours at a time, taking photos of developments below. One such flight revealed the buildup of Soviet nuclear missiles in Cuba, and sparked the Cuban Missile Crisis. With the advent of drones, and specifically the long-endurance high-altitude Global Hawk, the U-2's days in service might be numbered. A plan by Lockheed wants convert the venerable spy plane of the past into a modern surveillance robot of the future.

alissa.zhu
at 09:18 AM Nov 27 2014
Science // 

Charles Darwin may be a household name now, but we haven't always had the theory of natural selection. On November 24, 1859, he published On the Origin of Species as a culmination of nearly three decades of research after his journey on the H.M.S. Beagle. Happy 155th anniversary of On the Origin of Species!

michaeltabb
at 09:18 AM Nov 27 2014
Wikimedia Commons
Science // 

It's no accident that turkeys have more than doubled in size over the past 80 years—bigger is better, at least when it comes to the Thanksgiving table. But decades of farmers raising increasingly engorged turkeys isn't just bad for the birds, which may grow so large they can't even stand. Breeding focused on extreme muscle growth has led to an increasing number of turkeys falling victim to muscular and heart disease. The same practices lead many turkeys provide low-quality or otherwise unsavory meat. But a team of scientists believes they can reverse the unhealthy trend—with data they're collecting through genome sequencing.

dmoren
at 09:18 AM Nov 27 2014
Sony
Gadgets // 

What time is it? Time to get a smartwatch made entirely out of electronic paper. That's what Sony's rumored to launch sometime next year, according to Bloomberg, and it makes sense: There's intense and burgeoning interest in wearable technology.

fcdiep
at 09:18 AM Nov 27 2014
Nature // 

It's getting cold out there. Are you keeping your giraffes warm?

fcdiep
at 09:18 AM Nov 27 2014
NOAA
Nature // 

On hot vents deep underneath the Atlantic and Pacific oceans, there lives something unusual: a gene that fights bacteria. The gene belongs to a microscopic organism, scientifically named Aciduliprofundum boonei, that lives in the extreme environments atop undersea thermal vents all over the world.

Mary Beth Griggs
at 09:18 AM Nov 27 2014
Klaus Meiners, AAD (image) and Peter Kimball, WHOI (post-processing)
Robots // 

Robots are getting better all the time. They can mix drinks, explore other planets and even adapt to new situations. And they're not done yet. In a new paper published this week in Nature Geoscience, researchers describe using an autonomous underwater vehicle called SeaBED to map the underside of sea ice in Antarctica.

Mary Beth Griggs
at 18:01 PM Nov 26 2014
Nature // 

Glaciers are having a hard time all around the world. A new book outlines the findings of a years-long effort by researchers and research groups across the world. Titled Global Land Ice Measurements from Space (GLIMS), the book isn't going to hit bestseller lists anytime soon (it's a scientific tome, geared towards professionals), but it is the first truly comprehensive look at the state of the glaciers all over the globe. And that state is... not good.

jching87lin
at 08:21 AM Nov 26 2014
Wendell Minnick, at Defense News
Drones // 

A photo of AVIC's GCS display booth. Sadly, no working version of the control station was present at Zhuhai 2014. The GCS is designed to be compatible with a wide array of UAVs.

AthertonKD
at 08:21 AM Nov 26 2014
Space // 

Behold the fiery sphere of pain in the heavens! No, not the sun, this one is much, much closer to Earth, and much stranger still. Aboard the International Space Station, scientists have an electromagnetic levitator that lets them suspend a sphere of liquid metal in place. Why? To observe how it cools when it's free of a container or constraints like the strong gravity on Earth.

 
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