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  • The Ozone Layer Is On The Mend

    The Ozone Layer Is On The Mend

    An international agreement to phase out use of chemicals that damage the ozone layer appears to be working. A new report finds that ozone-depleting substances in the atmosphere are down by 10 to ... More >
  • Lasers Reveal Underground 'Super Henge'

    Lasers Reveal Underground 'Super Henge'

    Near the prehistoric Stonehenge monument, archeologists have found the buried traces of a "super henge" more than 4,900 feet in circumference. That's about as big around as the Astrodome and ... More >
  • Rosetta Takes A Selfie

    Rosetta Takes A Selfie

    The Rosetta robotic space probe has sent back this amazing photo of itself, illuminated in the sun's light. More >
  • A Google Glass App That Detects People's Emotions

    An App to Detect Emotions?

    Sometimes people are hard to read. Why not leave all that work to a computer? Perhaps you could use this experimental app that works in Google Glass. Aim Glass's camera at a person's face and ... More >
  • Home Built Elysium Style Exoskeleton Makes Lifting Concrete Barbells Easy

    A DIY Exoskeleton

    YouTuber the Hacksmith has built himself a set of Elysium style robot arms. Powered by compressed air, the system lets him easily curl a 77 KG barbell made from steel and concrete blocks. More >
Loren Grush
at 08:55 AM Sep 20 2014
AlloSource

What do the Curiosity rover and a bone allograft have in common? They both have got to be super duper clean.

Kelsey D. Atherton
at 08:53 AM Sep 20 2014
Baike.Baidu

It’s not often that a military advertises a weapon on what it doesn’t do, but at the Africa Aerospace and Defence exposition in Pretoria, South Africa, that’s exactly what Chinese arms manufacturer Poly Technologies did. The “Shoulder-Launched Rocket with Low Collateral Damage” is a weapon designed to give troops all the utility of a wall-piercing explosion, with a lot less of the accidental casualty downside.

Francie Diep
at 08:53 AM Sep 20 2014
NASA

Among the 2.5 tons of cargo that's set to go up to the International Space Station this weekend, there will be five mice with a particular genetic mutation. The mice lack a gene that normal mice have, called Muscle Ring Finger 1, or MuRF-1 (rhymes with Smurf). Scientists are hoping the missing gene will keep those mice healthier in space than their five ordinary compatriots that will be riding up with them.

Rafi Letzter
at 08:53 AM Sep 20 2014
Google
Cars // 

Picture this: You're on a cross-country road trip with your kids, passing through some dusty corner of Nevada in your self-driving 2030 Chevrolet Lumina. Your car then sends an invisible message across the desert: Three passengers. Two in child seats. Sixth hour without a break. A distant server whirrs, combs through a database of your and your kids' past online behavior, and beams a command back to your car. A grinning clown dances across your windshield and a familiar jingle plays. "McDonalds!" your kids squeal. Suddenly you have lunch plans.

Kelsey D. Atherton
at 08:52 AM Sep 20 2014
Alex Evers, via Wikimedia Commons
Drones // 

Here's a roundup of the week's top drone news: the military, commercial, non-profit, and recreational applications of unmanned aircraft.

Emily Gertz
at 08:52 AM Sep 20 2014
Wikimedia Commons
Science // 

Next week is Climate Week in New York City. The happenings begin on Sunday with what promises to be a massive march demanding action to curb human-propelled global warming. On Tuesday, the United Nations will hold an all-day climate-focused summit for world leaders.

Lois Parshley
at 08:52 AM Sep 20 2014
Jackhynes

Sierra Leone’s attempted lockdown is unprecedented: The whole country has been placed on house arrest and 20,000 volunteers have been recruited to help identify suspected Ebola carriers. “Some of the things we are asking you to do are difficult, but life is better than these difficulties,” President Ernest Bai Koroma said.

Rafi Letzter
at 08:52 AM Sep 20 2014
Zooniverse Penguin Watch
Science // 

50: number of cameras researchers are using to study penguin populations in the Antarctic. You can help researchers identify penguins in adorable photographs, all while helping to train their artificial penguin-spotting intelligence.

Francie Diep
at 12:20 PM Sep 19 2014
Graph created with Bookworm: Movies.
Science // 

Since about 2007, American pop culture has stopped talking about climate change -- at least in TV shows and movies. That's according to a new analysis of mentions of the words "global warming" and "climate change" in the two mediums since 1980. See:

Loren Grush
at 12:20 PM Sep 19 2014
Boeing

Of course, it wasn’t long before reality sank in. I’m not really part of this proverbial “we.” The rides are for NASA astronauts only, not for us mere mortals, fated to only walk on one planet for the rest of our lives. My excitement soon became mixed with a reinvigorated longing to explore the celestial frontier.

Kristen Hall-Geisler
at 12:20 PM Sep 19 2014
Kristen Hall-Geisler
Cars // 

A team of twenty students at the Eindhoven University of Technology in the Netherlands entered the Bridgestone World Solar Challenge 2013, a six-day solar race across Australia’s Outback, in the new Michelin Cruiser Class. Practicality was paramount for these entries, though energy use, payload capacity, and speed counted as well. The question to answer, according to Jordy de Renet, one of Stella’s drivers, was, “Do you want it in your daily life? Would you want to take it to get groceries?”

Emily Gertz
at 12:19 PM Sep 19 2014
Becky Stern/flickr
Fitness // 

Artificial sweeteners are a roughly $1.5 billion industry worldwide, often marketed as helpful for managing obesity and diabetes. But..

Lindsay Handmer
at 10:13 AM Sep 19 2014
Beyond The Brick

You can build a lot of cool stuff with LEGO. It's also really painful to step on. But at Brickworld events, the skills and projects are taken to a whole new level. It might not be super useful to move balls endlessly around a track, but there shear variety and ingenuity of the methods are amazing.

Lindsay Handmer
at 10:06 AM Sep 18 2014
E/V Nautilius
Nature // 

Looking more like a made up animal than something from real life, the creature in question is a Siphonophore. In the order of Hydrozoa, it's actually a colony composed of many individual animals.

Rafi Letzter
at 09:55 AM Sep 18 2014
ESA/Rosetta/NAVCAM
Space // 

Here's a refresher from middle school science class: An asteroid is a huge rock tumbling through the solar system, and that's pretty much all it looks like--a big rock. Meanwhile, a comet is a ball of ice and dust that has a long bright tail, which is caused by the Sun blasting that ice and dust off of the comet's surface as it zooms around.

 
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