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  • Navy's Long-Awaited Drone Moves Closer To Reality

    Don't Let This TERN Poop On You

    DARPA's latest drone program just took a turn for the better. The Tactically Exploited Reconnaissance Node (TERN) is designed as a Medium Altitude Long Endurance (MALE) flyer for the US Navy. Like ... More >
  • Warming Climate Could Change How Food Tastes

    Warming Climate Could Change How Food Tastes

    There might be some very tangible, selfish reasons for foodies to care about climate change. It turns out that warming temperatures could not only impact our food supply, but they might also ... More >
  • NASA Is Testing This 18-Engine Aeroplane Wing

    NASA Is Testing This 18-Engine Aeroplane Wing

    What happens if you put 18 engines on an airplane? Well, if you or I did it, the answer is likely “a disaster." But when NASA does it, we get the Leading Edge Asynchronous Propellers ... More >
  • Did The Future Begin In 1610?

    Did The Future Begin In 1610?

    Time is a valuable commodity for humans. We like our news up to the minute and our technology up-to-date. But when it comes to some temporal boundaries scientists are still trying to figure out ... More >
  • Why A Real CHAPPiE Robot Would Be More Of A Mystery Than A Friend

    A Real CHAPPiE Would Be... Weird

    Neil Blomkamp's new film CHAPPiE, which hits US theaters this weekend, follows the unlikely transformation of a defective robot into a one-of-a-kind conscious machine. The movie inserts ... More >
Alexandra Ossola
at 09:19 AM Mar 31 2015

Bloodletting, mercury cures, holes drilled in the head—many ancient medical remedies seem ill-advised based on our modern understanding of medicine. But researchers recently found that a thousand-year-old Anglo-Saxon treatment for eye infections works as an antibiotic against one of today's most notorious bacteria, Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). The British researchers will present their findings this week at an annual microbiology conference held in the United Kingdom.

Dan Moren
at 09:19 AM Mar 31 2015
University of Manchester
Science // 

Graphene is a material with marvelous properties: It can be used to make square ice and night vision contact lenses. It can even be made from your leftover dinner. And soon this form of pure carbon--which boasts a super-strong hexagonal structure at just a single atom thick--may even light your home.

Mary Beth Griggs
at 09:19 AM Mar 31 2015
Hacks // 

You know all those stories where humans accidentally create a monster that eventually runs amok and destroys everything? That cautionary tale is playing out in real-time in Florida right now. With termites.

Alexandra Ossola
at 09:19 AM Mar 31 2015

Though some may consider them a nuisance, opossums are amazingly hardy and opportunistic eaters, feeding on everything from the contents of a garbage can to fruits or snails. They also eat snakes and, thanks to an evolutionary chemical arms race, are immune to basically every kind of snake venom. Now, a team of researchers has isolated the peptide from the opossum that makes the animals resistant to snake bites, hoping to use it as a new, inexpensive antivenom in humans. The researchers presented their work on Sunday at the annual meeting of the American Chemical Society in Denver.

Kelsey D. Atherton
at 09:19 AM Mar 31 2015
Kelly Sponberg, NOAA

Weather is free, of course, but predicting it, and anticipating changes like sudden storms or flash floods--that takes technical equipment and sensors. Thanks to 3D printing and cheap commercial electronics, USAID thinks they can bring weather stations to the developing world. And they should only cost about $200 each.

Kelsey D. Atherton
at 09:19 AM Mar 31 2015
DARPA
Drones // 

DARPA's latest drone program just took a turn for the better. The Tactically Exploited Reconnaissance Node (TERN) is designed as a Medium Altitude Long Endurance (MALE) flyer for the US Navy. Like its avian namesake, TERN will be a sea-based flyer. The drone is designed as a sort of super crow's nest, flying from small vessels and scouting out the ocean ahead.

Mary Beth Griggs
at 09:19 AM Mar 30 2015
Nature // 

Antarctica is a frozen, beautiful continent, that might not be completely frozen for much longer. Just like the Arctic, Antarctica's ice shelves are disappearing, and fast, which could have impacts on coasts much closer to home.

Kelsey D. Atherton
at 09:19 AM Mar 30 2015
Linda Cicero, Stanford University
Drones // 

Airplane wings are rigid structures. They're great for wide open skies, but one bad collision with a wall or a tree branch and suddenly the flying machine has trouble staying airborne. Helicopter rotors also fare poorly when colliding with structures. But a new bio-inspired wing gives bat-like flexibility to mechanical wings, so they can bounce back after a collision.

Alexandra Ossola
at 09:19 AM Mar 30 2015

People with congenital colorblindness can see about 1 percent of the colors that a typical person can, and the condition can have negative impacts on their lives. Colorblindness can prevent people from becoming pilots or electricians, as well as limit their vision at night, putting themselves and others in danger. Now a pair of researchers are teaming up with the startup Avalanche Biotechnologies to develop a genetic therapy that could cure colorblindness.

Sarah Witman
at 09:19 AM Mar 30 2015
NASA/Robert Markowitz
Space // 

This afternoon, NASA astronaut Scott Kelly and Russian cosmonaut Mikhail Kornienko take off for a yearlong stay on the International Space Station. The record-breaking jaunt aims to help researchers understand how humans react and adapt to protracted stints in space. After all, we may soon find ourselves capable of traveling farther away from our home planet--and things can get weird while living long-term in zero gravity.

Alexandra Ossola
at 09:19 AM Mar 30 2015

On Tuesday, the news of the Germanwings flight crash en route to Dusseldorf appeared to be another tragic accident, like the AirAsia and Malaysia Airlines flights of the past year. But on Thursday, investigators announced that the crash was in fact intentional--when the pilot left the cockpit, the copilot locked him out and silently flew the plane into the French Alps.

Loren Grush
at 09:19 AM Mar 30 2015
NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute
Space // 

Ten hours, 32 minutes, and 44 seconds. That's how long a day lasts on Saturn. Researchers finally calculated this elusive statistic thanks to a new method developed by Tel Aviv University and published in the journal Nature.

Kelsey D. Atherton
at 09:19 AM Mar 30 2015
U.S. Air Force Photo

Yesterday, DARPA released their latest vision for the future. As the far-seeing technological eye of the Defense Department, DARPA's had its hand in everything from the launch of stealth fighter jets to the birth of the Internet. So when they predict the future, it's likely they're in a place to make that future come true. Here are four future technologies the DARPA report highlights, which we can expect to see on the battlefields of the future.

Alexandra Ossola
at 08:43 AM Mar 27 2015

No matter the colour or texture of their surroundings, squid are masters of camouflage, blending in to the scenery to avoid detection. Now, researchers from the University of California Irvine have isolated the source of the creature's disappearing act: a protein appropriately named reflection. Additionally, when the researchers layered this protein on a piece of tape, it rendered the tape invisible in particular wavelengths of light. The researchers presented their work this week at the meeting of the American Chemical Society in Denver.

Kelsey D. Atherton
at 08:42 AM Mar 27 2015
Kickstarter
Drones // 

Applied Aeronautics sees its new Albatross drone as one perched between two extremes in unmanned aircraft: the low cost and high breakability of traditional hobbyist drones on one end, and the high cost of durable, professional drones on the other. With a crowdfunding project well under way, Applied Aeronautics hopes that its drone can swoop into the sweet spot in the middle, creating a useful tool that people can actually buy and use.

 
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