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  • How To Give A Mouse Ebola

    How To Give A Mouse Ebola

    If you give a lab mouse the mouse version of Ebola, it will die. But not in the same way humans with Ebola do. Lab mice infected with Ebola don't get hemorrhagic fever. They don't form tiny clots ... More >
  • The Co-Robots In 'Interstellar' Are Gorgeous--And Silly

    What the Heck is a Co-Robot?

    When humans finally set foot on an alien world, they’ll be joined by robots. That’s not a bold prediction. It’s a statement of the obvious. Machines have already beat us to Mars ... More >
  • Interstellar Travel Won't Look Anything Like The Movie

    Interstellar Travel Won't Look Like The Movie

    Christopher Nolan's Interstellar imagines a human journey to planets beyond our star. But that kind of trip would seem impossible in today's terms. Fortunately, a DARPA-funded task ... More >
  • Future Aeroplanes Might Replace Windows With OLED Screens

    Future Planes Might Have No Windows

    There may be no such thing as a window seat on the airliners of the future. A concept released by the U.K.’s Centre for Process Innovation (CPI) envisions airliners with thinner walls, made ... More >
  • MIT Students Claim Astronauts Will Starve On 'Mars One' Mission

    Mars One Colonists Could Starve

    The students, part of a research group specializing in large-scale multi-billion dollar space programs, used publically available information about the Mars One mission plans to simulate ... More >
Loren Grush
at 07:20 AM Oct 31 2014
SuperJet International via Flickr

At first, the video displays the virtual insides of a crowded passenger airplane. Then all of a sudden, one of the passengers seated in the middle "sneezes." Hundreds of multicolored particles are jettisoned into the air, creating a rainbow-speckled cloud that lingers above everyone’s heads. The cloud dissolves, and the particles disperse, making their way to the unlucky few seated adjacent to the sick passenger.

Loren Grush
at 07:20 AM Oct 31 2014
Detlev Van Ravenswaay/SPL
Space // 

Criticism continues to grow for NASA’s Asteroid Retrieval Mission (ARM) -- the space agency’s plan to capture a 10-meter-wide piece of an asteroid and bring it into lunar orbit for further analysis. Among experts’ complaints: The mission is expensive; it doesn’t really further our knowledge of asteroids; and it doesn’t help us get to Mars.

Mary Beth Griggs
at 07:20 AM Oct 31 2014
Public domain via Wikimedia Commons
Science // 

Amelia Earhart disappeared 77 years ago, but 2014 is turning out to be a banner year for her. Her namesake completed a memorial flight around the world, reenacting the original Earhart's infamous flight (without so much of a tragic ending). Now, a group believes that they have found a piece of Earhart's ill-fated plane.   

Rebecca Lantner
at 07:20 AM Oct 31 2014
Sam Kaplan
Fitness // 

Bad news, trick-or-treaters: A new recommendation from the World Health Organization (WHO) deals a serious blow to your annual candy binge. The guideline, set to be released this fall, drops the suggested daily intake of “free sugars”—those added to processed foods, such as high-fructose corn syrup, and those that result when naturally occurring sugars are refined, as with maple syrup.

Francie Diep
at 07:20 AM Oct 31 2014
Brian Donohue

If you give a lab mouse the mouse version of Ebola, it will die. But not in the same way humans with Ebola do. Lab mice infected with Ebola don't get hemorrhagic fever. They don't form tiny clots in their blood, like human Ebola sufferers do, even though the genetic sequence of the mouse Ebolavirus differs from human Ebolavirus in only 13 out of its nearly 19,000 DNA letters.

Mary Beth Griggs
at 07:20 AM Oct 31 2014
lawrencegs via Flickr
Gadgets // 

One of the selling points of Google Glass is its ability to take pictures and video of anything within your field of vision, but when that field of vision is occupied by the latest major motion picture, your Google Glass now needs to be far, far away. 

Mary Beth Griggs
at 08:44 AM Oct 30 2014
Science // 

Forensic scientists often have to reconstruct the events leading up to and following a person's death, in case of foul play. The state of the body can reveal when the person died, how, and where the body was disposed of.

Mary Beth Griggs
at 08:44 AM Oct 30 2014
USGS/HVO
Nature // 

Compared to most natural disasters, a lava invasion does not move all that fast. Nowhere is that more evident than the small Hawaiian community of Pahoa, where a lava flow has been approaching the town since June 27. Now, the lava has finally arrived on the outskirts of town, overrunning private property. In the picture above, the lava behind the fence is chest-high. Geologists are keeping a close eye on the progress of the flow, which currently seems to be headed straight for Pahoa Village Road, one of the village's main streets, and beyond that, for Highway 130, a traffic artery travelled by 10,000 cars a day. It's already crossed over one road, Cemetery Road, and a cemetery (presumably the road's namesake). 

Francie Diep
at 08:44 AM Oct 30 2014
CDC/ Dr. Fred Murphy; Sylvia Whitfield

After U.S. government researchers discovered six forgotten vials of smallpox in a freezer this past June, the plan was to destroy the vials. That's still the plan… but the demolition date has been pushed back, Nature News reports.

Francie Diep
at 10:18 AM Oct 29 2014
Alison Seiffer
Energy // 

Hanging out in the kitchen? Chances are, you—and your smartphone—are within five metres of the refrigerator. Right now, two companies are planning for a future in which that means you could get the charge on your phone topped off.

Francie Diep
at 10:18 AM Oct 29 2014
Image provided by NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's Landsat Team using data courtesy the Australian ground receiving station teams
Nature // 

The Commonwealth has been working on a plan for taking care of the Great Barrier Reef over the next four decades—but scientists say it's inadequate. The Australian Academy of Science released today an 11-page critique of the government's latest draft of its Reef 2050 Long-Term Sustainability Plan.

Mary Beth Griggs
at 10:18 AM Oct 29 2014
Glen via Flickr

Physics says that if two particles are entangled on a quantum level, they are permanently linked -- a change in one particle will instantaneously affect the other one, no matter the distance between them. That’s something that could be fantastic for quickly transporting information across vast distances … but only if we can figure out how to use it.

Francie Diep
at 10:18 AM Oct 29 2014
NASA, ESA, and A. Simon (Goddard Space Flight Center)
Space // 

When the Hubble Telescope snapped this true-color image in April, NASA scientists found Jupiter staring right back at them. That black dot is Ganymede's shadow, crossing Jupiter's Great Red Spot, creating an eerily blank-looking eye. It is almost certainly the eye of a large and eternally amused monster (after all, Jupiter was, among other things, the "bringer of jollity").

Alissa Zhu
at 10:18 AM Oct 29 2014
Juan Aragones, Josh Steimel, and Alfredo Alexander-Katz

In the 90s kids show The Magic School Bus, eccentric teacher Ms. Frizzle took her class for a wild ride in a sick student’s immune system -- only to be attacked by white blood cells. White blood cells tracked the bus using the same chemical traces they follow to find infected sites or navigate their way to viruses. If microscopic robots could replicate this complex navigation system, which is shared by many different cells and bacteria, doctors could use them to provide real-time updates on internal structures or distribute drugs to specific targets within a body.

Kelsey D. Atherton
at 10:18 AM Oct 29 2014
Centre for Process Innovation

There may be no such thing as a window seat on the airliners of the future. A concept released by the U.K.’s Centre for Process Innovation (CPI) envisions airliners with thinner walls, made by doing away with cabin windows altogether. In their place, CPI sees OLED screens lining entire interior walls, which would show passengers the sky around them.

 
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