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  • This February Smashed Temperature Records Around The Globe

    Global Temperature Records Tumble

    Things are heating up, and not in a good way. This past February was the hottest February on record. According to a new report released by NOAA, temperatures around the world were 2.18 degrees ... More >
  • Google Will Sell Boston Dynamics, Makers of Robotic Creatures

    Google To Sell Robot R&D Lab

    Dystopian wobbly robots are not what Google was searching for. As reported today by Bloomberg, Google is selling Boston Dynamics, makers of such indelible robots as dog-mimicking BigSpot; the ... More >
  • Playstation VR Vs. Oculus Rift Vs. HTC Vive: Here's How They Stack Up

    VR: The New Platform Wars

    Sony announced today at GDC 2016 in California that the Playstation VR will cost $399 and release in October 2016. Now that the three major virtual reality headset makers have finalized consumer ... More >
  • Inflatable Addition To The Space Station Will Launch In April

    The ISS Gets an Inflatable Module

    The first astronauts on Mars probably won't live in a tin can like the International Space Station. Big, heavy structures are expensive to launch, and aren't great at protecting against the ... More >
  • Why Did the US Air Force Play with Cats in Space?

    Why Did the US Air Force Play with Cats in Space?

    In 1947, the Air Force played with kittens in microgravity. In October of 1962, the same lab published a report titled “Weightless Man: Self-Rotation Techniques.” Among other research, ... More >
Carl Franzen
at 16:04 PM Apr 30 2016

Remember earlier this month when SpaceX succeeded in landing its Falcon 9 rocket first-stage booster on a drone ship out in the Atlantic for the first time ever (and the first time ever by any private company)? That was pretty cool. Now the company has released a new 360-degree video of the historic landing on YouTube. Personally, I still prefer the flat video captured from afar. Watch it here. TGIF!

Kelsey D. Atherton
at 16:04 PM Apr 30 2016
Siemens
Robots // 

Shipbuilding is a community effort. For Siemens, that community in the future won't just be the engineers, designers, and workmen on a project: it will also include an army of small robot spiders, 3D printing and weaving together plastic to build that hull. Think of it like a normal shipbuilding facility, only with hundreds of tiny scurrying parts, all working together.

Claire Maldarelli
at 16:04 PM Apr 30 2016
Cobalt
Science // 

Norman Kuring, an oceanographer for NASA who examines images taken by NASA's Landsat 8 satellite, couldn't figure out what caused the bizarre scars in the sea in the photo above, The New York Times reports. So he went on a Twitter quest to find out. After much input from followers, he concluded that the wind had blown around huge stacks of ice that had piled up on the seafloor, creating the scars as they dragged along.

Xavier Harding
at 16:04 PM Apr 30 2016
Xavier Harding
Gadgets // 

Where many companies are obsessed with making the latest, greatest smartphone, Amazon has found success with other modern devices. Along with the Amazon Echo and Echo Dot line of personal assistants, the former bookseller shines when it comes to giving you a modern way to read those books. The Kindle line started in 2007, but here in 2016, the line of e-readers serves the same function: offering a convenient way to consume your ever-growing book collection. The latest iteration of the e-reader, Amazon's Kindle Oasis, continues to pursue that mission—with longer battery life, a squatter form-factor and a very high price tag.

Kelsey D. Atherton
at 16:04 PM Apr 30 2016
Benjamin Stevens, U.S. Navy, via Wikimedia Commons
Drones // 

Robots are going to take all the boring jobs first. This extends even to the military, where the Navy wants to keep humans flying fighter jets in attack missions, but switch over the less exciting scouting and refueling missions to drones. Looking toward that future, the U.S. Navy has outfitted the supercarrier USS Carl Vinson with a drone control room.

Claire Maldarelli
at 16:04 PM Apr 30 2016
CDC via Wikimedia Commons

Today, Puerto Rico's health secretary, Ana Rius, confirmed that the U.S. territory has had its first recorded death relating to the Zika virus. According to the Associated Press, Rius said a 70-year-old man who was infected with the virus died in February. His death was directly caused by a drop in blood platelets, a condition known as thrombocytopenia, that can cause internal bleeding.

Kelsey D. Atherton
at 16:04 PM Apr 30 2016
NASA/Dmitri Gerondidakis
Space // 

When Boeing's new CST-100 Starliner spacecraft carries its first astronauts to the International Space Station in 2017 or 2018, it's going to ring in a whole new era of American spaceflight. And to prepare for these missions, NASA is training its astronauts on the next generation of controls. And much like the controls from Star Trek: the Next Generation, these new consoles are all touchscreen.

Carl Franzen
at 16:04 PM Apr 30 2016
CERN
Science // 

What is it with small mammals and electrical lines? Not even the world's largest and most powerful particle accelerator, the Large Hadron Collider, is immune from their meddling. The multi-billion dollar scientific instrument that located the elusive Higgs Boson particle back in 2012 has suffered widespread electrical problems in recent days, thought to be caused by a (now-deceased) small mammal gnawing on a transformer line, according to NPR and New Scientist.

Kelsey D. Atherton
at 16:04 PM Apr 30 2016
Hona
Cars // 

Autonomous cars are a chance to reinvent the steering wheel. Because the vehicles themselves do all the driving, cars are no longer bound by such basic conventions as “keep a human facing forward at all times” and “don't try to climb over boulders like a spider." Okay, it's more than just the relationship between the car and driver that's changing in that one.

Sarah Fecht
at 16:04 PM Apr 30 2016
Blue Origin

For all that rocket science gets a reputation for being complicated, it all boils down to some simple concepts. You burn stuff, and spew the resulting gases out a nozzle. Those gases coming out at high speeds push the rocket in the opposite direction.

Jeffrey Lin and P.W. Singer
at 16:04 PM Apr 30 2016
Pinzgauer, at China Defense Forum

The Chinese Navy (PLAN) has been expanding its power with a series of new, more capable surface warships like the 052D guided missile destroyers (DDG) and 054A frigates, while preparing its Type 055 cruiser for a launch at decade's end. but equally notable is how it is also spending big bucks to update its older warships to make them relevant in A2/AD operations.

Mary Beth Griggs
at 16:04 PM Apr 30 2016
Nature // 

As much as a jellyfish sting hurts, and as gross as those blobs of washed-up jellyfish carcasses are on the beach, there is something undeniably appealing about a jellyfish floating in the water, minding its own business.

Alexandra Ossola
at 16:04 PM Apr 30 2016

For the one in 50,000 people born with the genetic disorder choroideremia, there's no treatment that can slow the progressive vision loss. Scientists from the University of Oxford have been developing a gene therapy treatment to reverse the effects of the disease, and, though the initial results seemed promising, they had not been sure the treatment would work in the long term.

Mary Beth Griggs
at 16:04 PM Apr 30 2016
Frederic Osada and Teddy Seguin/DRASSM
Robots // 

Meet OceanOne, a robot avatar that lets humans explore deep under the Ocean's surface, without any of the dangers or time limits associated with diving.

Kelsey D. Atherton
at 16:04 PM Apr 30 2016
Screenshot by author, from YouTube

The United Kingdom might have a mad scientist problem. Or at least, a mad engineer one. Colin Furze, a YouTuber who seems to have unlimited energy for creating working versions of science fictional devices, made a thermite-hurling fire cannon last month. Now, with sponsorship from Ford, it seems he's expanded his repertoire to hoverbikes.

 
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