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  • MIT Students Claim Astronauts Will Starve On 'Mars One' Mission

    Mars One Colonists Could Starve

    The students, part of a research group specializing in large-scale multi-billion dollar space programs, used publically available information about the Mars One mission plans to simulate ... More >
  • From The Archives: How The $10 Million Ansari X Prize Was Won

    The New Right Stuff

    Ten years ago this week, commercial spaceflight took off when a private spaceflight company won the Ansari X Prize: a space competition that was offering a $10 million reward to any ... More >
  • How An Evangelical Christian Researcher Reconciles Science With Her Faith

    The Christian Scientist

    Editor's note: Our profile of Bill Nye [September 2014] elicited an impassioned response from readers. We received more than 100 letters, many from readers grappling with how to reconcile ... More >
  • In Africa, Ebola Patients Need More Than Medicine

    Ebola Patients Need More Than Medicine

    The dusty hills around Lima sprout concrete at all angles. There are many words here for the gray delineation of poverty-struck areas: áreas tugurizadas (slum zones), the less formal tugurios ... More >
  • Space Combat Won't Look At All Like 'Star Wars'

    Space Combat Won't Look At All Like 'Star Wars'

    If humanity brings war into space, what will those battles look like? Well, if our understanding of physics is anything close to correct, they won’t look at all like Star Wars. In this six ... More >
Sarah Fecht
at 14:15 PM Oct 24 2014
CDC Global via Flickr

The Ebola outbreak in West Africa is growing exponentially. The latest reports suggest that at least 9,915 people have been infected, and 4,555 have died. And this is just the beginning. Previously, the CDC estimated that a startling 1.4 million West Africans could be infected by January.  

Kevin Ohannessian
at 09:53 AM Oct 24 2014
Cars // 

In the future, we may not be dealing with the hassles and frustrations that come with driving cars everyday. Autonomous automobiles can make our lives better! But are cars that drive by themselves all that it's cracked up to be?

Rafi Letzter
at 09:53 AM Oct 24 2014
Screenshot from doctoroz.com
Science // 

The scientists who published sham research on a useless weight loss supplement once called a "miracle pill" on the Dr. Oz Show have retracted their study.

Francie Diep
at 09:53 AM Oct 24 2014
Betzig Lab, HHMI

There's a new microscope in town and the images it produces are stunning. An international team of engineers and biologists is announcing it's made a microscope that's able to see phenomena such as single proteins diffusing through thickly-packed cells, and the movement of the fibers that pull cells apart when they divide. Everything remains alive and active under the microscope.

Francie Diep
at 09:47 AM Oct 24 2014
Takao Someya Group/University of Tokyo
Robots // 

Engineers make disaster-response robots precisely because robots are able to work in situations that are too dangerous for humans. Now the humans have got a new idea: Perhaps robots could carry off waste from Ebola patients, or bury the bodies of people who have died from Ebola in West Africa. Roboticizing such tasks would keep people from having to touch bodies when they're most infectious.

Anthony Fordham
at 11:31 AM Oct 23 2014
Science // 

Actor and producer Renee Zellweger has a new face. So far, so Hollywood, right? But the usual blogs and clickbait sites have exploded with coverage, and inevitably other blogs have responded saying the actor's choice of plastic surgery is hers alone, and none of our business. But why are people so interested in yet another celebrity going under the knife? Could it be because of unique human brain biology?

Mary Beth Griggs
at 09:37 AM Oct 23 2014
Ryosuke Yagi via Flickr
Fitness // 

Of sports played on ice, hockey tends to get the most attention when it comes to injuries. But figure skaters are also pretty injury-prone, and because of the aesthetic nature of their sport, most figure skaters eschew pads and protective gear while on the ice. This means avoiding injuries can be difficult for practitioners of the sport, in which skaters can exert forces of more than six times their body weight during a jump.  

Kevin Ohannessian
at 09:37 AM Oct 23 2014
Astrobotic
Space // 

A team of scientists at Carnegie Mellon have built a robot that will send video from the moon to the Earth. And the robot will be controlled by the Oculus Rift virtual reality headset, with the 3-D camera on the robot turning to match the head movements of the user.

Kevin Ohannessian
at 09:37 AM Oct 23 2014
Microsoft.
Gaming // 

In Xbox One’s newest software updates, which roll out in November, the gaming console's television functions will be integrated with Twitter. This means you can watch a show on the top portion of the screen and simultaneously send out tweets in the "Snap" sidebar. An optional bottom pane will show tweets that are tied to whatever TV series is being played.

Mary Beth Griggs
at 09:37 AM Oct 23 2014
Kabacchi via Flickr
Nature // 

With it’s teeny-tiny head and massive spiked tail, the Stegosaurus is instantly identifiable to dinosaur fans. But to predators like the Allosaurus, the Stegosaurus would have been identifiable as lunch. 

Rafi Letzter
at 09:37 AM Oct 23 2014
Jetske via Flickr
Science // 

Some people just don't like cats. That's okay. Some people don't like pizza. Or dogs. Or Harry Potter. But some cat-haters aren't satisfied with not owning cats themselves. They need to drag the rest of us down with them.

Loren Grush
at 09:37 AM Oct 23 2014
ESO/L. Calçada
Space // 

About 63 light years from our Sun, you’ll find a relatively young star called Beta Pictoris. A mere 20 million years old, Beta Pictoris is surrounded by a very active and eclectic mix of objects – including clouds of gas and dust, as well as a plethora of orbiting comets.

Kelsey D. Atherton
at 09:37 AM Oct 23 2014
Sarah Larson, via Wikimedia Commons
Cars // 

A major selling point of self-driving cars is what they remove from the road: human error, driver exhaustion, distracted driving because someone has to keep reminding the urchins in the backseat that "No, we’re not there yet, and if you keep asking I'm pulling the car over right now." Less attention has been paid to the new capabilities driverless cars will open up, such as traveling at much higher speeds than a human driver could manage. Carmaker Audi claims they just set a speed record for driverless cars, zooming 149 mph around a racing circuit in (of course) Germany.

Mary Beth Griggs
at 09:37 AM Oct 23 2014
TCF Architecture via GSA
Science // 

What do you do in a tsunami? For people living in areas prone to tsunamis, the advice is simple: get to higher ground as fast as possible. But for one town in Washington, safety will soon be as close as the local elementary school.

Kelsey D. Atherton
at 09:37 AM Oct 23 2014
Photo courtesy of Sandia National Laboratories

In the tense moments of a long-range gun battle, unnecessary movements can give away a combatant's position, cause them to lose sight of the enemy, and possibly lead to fatalities. For America’s special forces, Sandia National Laboratories has developed a new sniper scope that, with the press of a button, adjusts focus. Called Rapid Adaptive Zoom for Assault Rifles (RAZAR), the lens has immediate uses on the battlefield, but in the future, it might just be a birdwatcher's best friend.

 
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