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  • Cooking With Lava

    Lava Cooking

    British art and design duo Bompas and Parr love crazy cooking projects and lava seemed like the ideal way to give their steak a unique flavour. Teaming up with Professor Robert Wysocki from ... More >
  • Welcome To Mars. Here's Where You'll Be Staying

    Welcome To Mars. Here's Where You'll Be Staying

    NASA has plans to put humans on Mars in the 2030s or 2040s, and the private company Mars One is already interviewing applicants for its one-way trip to the Red Planet. But a couple of crucial ... More >
  • Japan's Military Will Patrol Earth's Orbitals

    Japan's Military Will Patrol Earth's Orbitals

    Japan's military plans to take defense to the heavens in 2019. According to a report by Japan's Kyodo News Agency, Japan's Self-Defense Forces plan to add a space monitoring branch, to be ... More >
  • New Mars Rover Will Have Lasers, X-Ray Vision, And More

    New Mars Rover Does Cool Tricks

    The Curiosity rover (or Mars Science Laboratory, as NASA wonks call it) has been an immensely successful mission so far. But now NASA is planning the next mission to Mars, and today the agency ... More >
  • Milky Way Has The Mass Of 800 Billion Suns, Study Finds

    How Much Does The Milky Way?

    Astronomers have performed yet another checkup on our home galaxy, this time asking it to step on a scale. The Milky Way has a mass equal to 800 billion suns, according to the team of ... More >
Lindsay Handmer
at 10:28 AM Aug 27 2014
Wikimedia Commons
Tech // 

The Iron Dome is a mobile all weather air defense system deployed in Israel. In operation since 2011, it has already shot down hundreds of missiles. The amazing technology in action reminds us of Atari Missile Command, but check out the video for yourself.

Francie Diep
at 07:14 AM Aug 27 2014
U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Public and private donors in the U.K. have launched an emergency fund for researchers studying Ebola. They want a quick turnaround time for the research they bankroll. Applications for the fund are due September 8 and funders are hoping studies will finish within two months, the Guardian reports. The tight timeline is designed to make a difference in the current outbreak in West Africa, which Doctors Without Borders expects to last longer than six months.

Loren Grush
at 07:14 AM Aug 27 2014
Peking University Third Hospital

Doctors at Peking University Third Hospital have successfully implanted the first ever 3-D-printed section of vertebra into the young patient. The boy, named Minghao, had developed a malignant tumor on his spinal cord, and some of his bones needed to be removed. So, during many hours of spinal cord surgery, surgeons at the hospital replaced part of the cancerous vertebra in his neck with the implant.

Kelsey D. Atherton
at 07:14 AM Aug 27 2014
TASER
Gadgets // 

Surveillance cameras permeate modern life. Mounted in convenience stores, retail outlets, bars, clubs, ATMs and elsewhere, silent observers record everything from the mundane to the criminal. The cameras serve a dual function as both deterrent and instant legal record. In light of the police shooting of unarmed Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri, national attention has focused on wearable cameras for police officers. For the (less lethal) weapon manufacturer Taser, there is opportunity in this civic need.

Francie Diep
at 07:14 AM Aug 27 2014
Photo by Lance Cheung, U.S. Department of Agriculture

Before 2012, outbreaks of so-called "influenza A variant" infections in the U.S. only popped up once in a while in the medical literature. The strain normally infected pigs and was rarely seen in humans. Then, in 2012, healthcare workers across the U.S. reported 309 human cases of influenza A (H3N2) variant, also known as H3N2v. Sixteen people were hospitalized, and one woman in Ohio died. Researchers think there were likely thousands of cases of H3N2v that year that went unreported or unconfirmed.

Kelsey D. Atherton
at 07:14 AM Aug 27 2014
Courtesy photo, U.S. Army

The art of the war is complicated, but the science of war is often just a matter of shooting something pain-inducing at the other guy faster and from further away. The Army’s Advanced Hypersonic Weapon program wants to do just that, by creating a missile that moves faster than Mach 5, or almost 3,800 miles per hour. That hypersonic future may be just a little further away than expected. During testing of the weapon in Alaska early Monday morning, the rockets propelling the missile exploded four seconds after liftoff. No one was injured, but the cause of the failure has yet to be determined. 

Lindsay Handmer
at 09:40 AM Aug 26 2014
Lockheed Martin
Tech // 

Big powered exoskeleton suits are great and all, but Lockheed Martin has built a passive model. Dubbed the FORTIS, the system doesn't use any power at all yet still aids the users strength. In fact, it allows you to wield a 16KG tool with almost no effort. But how is that possible without any motors?

Francie Diep
at 09:26 AM Aug 26 2014
Photo by Dean Peterson
Science // 

One U.S. Department of Agriculture researcher is experimenting with a sandblasting-style method of killing weeds that could be certified organic, Minneapolis' Star Tribune reports. Agronomist Frank Forcella is blasting weeds with a spray of ground-up corncobs, walnut shells, corn gluten meal and other plant material. Sounds like he's exfoliating the weeds to death.

Kelsey D. Atherton
at 09:25 AM Aug 26 2014
Malloy Aeronautics
Make // 

A white plastic robot zooms a hoverbike over the English countryside, grains blowing beneath the bike's four fans. The robot's 3-D printed body is lightweight, and where its face would be there’s a GoPro camera instead, filming the flight. This isn't a scene from a dystopian science fiction movie; The bike is less than four feet long, and combined robot and bike weighs a maximum of 15.4 pounds. Created by Malloy Aeronautics, the Drone 3 hoverbike is a 1/3rd scale model of the version ultimately intended for human pilots and passengers.

Sarah Fecht
at 09:25 AM Aug 26 2014
BAE Systems

If the engineers succeed in bringing the idea to fruition, the aircraft coating will be able to sense changes and report back to a remote operator—similar to how human skin provides feedback to help the brain to make decisions. The hope is that by sensing anomalies, the coating could prevent small problems from turning into big disasters. 

Francie Diep
at 09:25 AM Aug 26 2014
SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory
Science // 

With a temperature below -268 degrees Celsius, liquid helium keeps MRI machines and particle accelerators properly cooled (yay!). Take liquid helium's temperature even lower than that, however, and things start to get a little less practical -- and a lot more weird.

Popular Science Staff
at 19:29 PM Aug 24 2014
Janice Haney Carr/CDC
Nature // 

What do human scalps, deep sea vents, and Antarctic soil have in common? As it turns out, all of these places are home to one weird group of fungi. A study published today in the journal PLOS Pathogens found that fungi of the genus Malassezia are just about everywhere. And we do mean everywhere.  

Popular Science Staff
at 19:29 PM Aug 24 2014
Science // 

Some parts of America's complete breakfast are about to get pricier. Or, at the very least, they’re about to get pricier than they already are. With droughts raging in agricultural powerhouses like California and Brazil, the dreaded water conflicts of the future are starting to make their presence known right now. Because of the severity and long-term nature of these droughts, food prices are starting to rise for consumers -- in America and beyond.

Kelsey D. Atherton
at 19:29 PM Aug 24 2014
Mitchell Sipus
Drones // 

A century ago, as cars first emerged into the world, cities and laws that were designed for horses suddenly had to adapt to a whole new presence in their space. Cities didn’t know how to handle these fast machines, and fatal accidents in the early age of cars led to legal battles between pedestrians and cars over who had the right to the road. Now,  commercial drones are approaching their Model-T moment, and planners can get ahead of this by plotting out their cities in color-coded three-dimensional blocks of sky.

Daniel Engber
at 19:29 PM Aug 24 2014
Illustration by Jason Schneider
Nature // 

May started his research with a pair of pickled woodpeckers borrowed from a zoologist. In studying their cranial anatomy, he and his collaborators found a patch of spongy bone at the front of the skull, which they thought might act like a shock absorber. Woodpeckers also have a bone called the hyoid, which supports the tongue and then winds all the way around the bird’s head. A researcher later argued that the hyoid could function as a sort of cerebral safety belt.

 
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