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  • Cooking With Lava

    Lava Cooking

    British art and design duo Bompas and Parr love crazy cooking projects and lava seemed like the ideal way to give their steak a unique flavour. Teaming up with Professor Robert Wysocki from ... More >
  • Welcome To Mars. Here's Where You'll Be Staying

    Welcome To Mars. Here's Where You'll Be Staying

    NASA has plans to put humans on Mars in the 2030s or 2040s, and the private company Mars One is already interviewing applicants for its one-way trip to the Red Planet. But a couple of crucial ... More >
  • Japan's Military Will Patrol Earth's Orbitals

    Japan's Military Will Patrol Earth's Orbitals

    Japan's military plans to take defense to the heavens in 2019. According to a report by Japan's Kyodo News Agency, Japan's Self-Defense Forces plan to add a space monitoring branch, to be ... More >
  • New Mars Rover Will Have Lasers, X-Ray Vision, And More

    New Mars Rover Does Cool Tricks

    The Curiosity rover (or Mars Science Laboratory, as NASA wonks call it) has been an immensely successful mission so far. But now NASA is planning the next mission to Mars, and today the agency ... More >
  • Milky Way Has The Mass Of 800 Billion Suns, Study Finds

    How Much Does The Milky Way?

    Astronomers have performed yet another checkup on our home galaxy, this time asking it to step on a scale. The Milky Way has a mass equal to 800 billion suns, according to the team of ... More >
Lindsay Handmer
at 10:22 AM Sep 2 2014
Oddur Sigurdsson, Iceland Geological Survey
Nature // 

Thanks to the power of technology and the internet, you can watch the latest eruption in Iceland from the safety of your home.

Andrew Rosenblum
at 07:53 AM Sep 2 2014
Photo Courtesy of Adam Simpson

Oak Ridge National Laboratory is most famously home to the Titan supercomputer, capable of performing more than 20 quadrillion calculations every second. But the lab also houses the lesser known “Tiny Titan,” whose nine processing units, or “cores,” are made from Raspberry Pis. Making a small-scale supercomputer is relatively simple—just yoke together microelectronics to run in parallel. The hard part, explains Titan support specialist Adam Simpson, is writing the code for it. 

Emily Gertz
at 07:53 AM Sep 2 2014
Nature // 

An unholy trinity of forces – levees along the Mississippi River, sea level rise due to climate change, and fossil fuel extraction – have caused about 2,000 square miles of southeastern Louisiana to disappear into the Gulf of Mexico over the past eight decades. That's according to Losing Ground, a multimedia journalism collaboration between ProPublica and The Lens, offers an interactive, thorough, and thoroughly sobering look at it, with layered maps and satellite images, impressive photographs and first-person audio.

Sarah Fecht
at 07:53 AM Sep 2 2014
Popular Science
Tech // 

As a magazine with 142 years of history, Popular Science sits on a treasure trove of vintage illustrations, perceptive predictions, obsolete technologies, essays by Nobel prize-winning scientists, and some seriously awkward advertisements. That's why we're using Throwback Thursdays as an excuse to dust off those back issues and share their stories with you, Dear Readers. Every Thursday we’ll bring you highlights from 25, 50, 75, or 100 years ago. 

Sarah Fecht
at 07:53 AM Sep 2 2014
DigitalGlobe
Space // 

The WorldView-3 satellite, which launched on August 13, has sent back its first images. They’re gorgeous, and kind of creepy.

Loren Grush
at 07:53 AM Sep 2 2014
Dave Mosher

I was peering out through the helmet of my space suit, when something terrible happened: I got an itch. And with my hands unable to touch my face, scratching it the good old fashioned way was out of the question. Thankfully, the suit’s manufacturer’s had predicted this very scenario and planned accordingly. A strip of velcro was positioned inside the helmet for me, and I was able to rub my face against it, relieving the discomfort. Even in space, things can get a little itchy.

Kelsey D. Atherton
at 07:47 AM Sep 2 2014
SolarSurfer via Wikimedia Commons
Drones // 

Here's a roundup of the week's top drone news: the military, commercial, non-profit, and recreational applications of unmanned aircraft.

Loren Grush
at 07:47 AM Sep 2 2014
Malloy Aeronautics
Science // 

-268: temperature in degrees Celsius of liquid helium when it is used in MRI machines and particle accelerators. Below that, liquid helium starts to demonstrate weird quantum effects.

Loren Grush
at 07:47 AM Sep 2 2014
Wikimedia Commons
Science // 

One hundred years ago today, the scientific community mourned the passing of a very important bird. Her name was Martha (after George Washington’s wife), and she was the last known passenger pigeon to have existed.  She died in her cage at the Cincinnati Zoo in 1914, marking the end of the passenger pigeon species, Ectopistes migratorius.

Loren Grush
at 07:47 AM Sep 2 2014
Via Scottsdale Community College

You have around 100 trillion bacteria living in your gut — and that’s a good thing. Known as gut flora or the gut microbiome, these microorganisms help your body digest certain foods, aid the immune system, and maintain a healthy gastrointestinal tract, all in exchange for a constant food supply.

Lindsay Handmer
at 11:52 AM Sep 1 2014
Birk Mobius
Science // 

Getting a photo of a lighting strike is hard enough. Capturing it as it overlays the curve of a rainbow is even more incredible. But to actually see lighting hitting a plane at the same time is an amazing piece of timing.

Lindsay Handmer
at 10:25 AM Aug 29 2014
Google
Drones // 

After Amazon teased us with potential aerial deliveries, the skies remained free of pizza winging its way to hungry mouths. But now Google's Project Wing has been outed - a secretive test by the Google X team into the feasibility of drone deliveries. Suddenly the future of package delivery is looking a whole lot brighter.

Kelsey D. Atherton
at 09:27 AM Aug 29 2014
South China Morning Post

The submarine of the future may come to America in a super fast bubble, traveling under water. Researchers at China's Harbin Institute of Technology developed a new concept for submarine “supercavitation,” where an underwater vessel creates a pocket of air around itself. Inside this bubble, the submarine can travel much faster without friction of water creating drag and slowing it down. Theoretically, a supercavitated vessel using rocket engines could travel inside that air pocket at almost the speed of sound.

Francie Diep
at 09:27 AM Aug 29 2014
Wikimedia Commons

A team of researchers has found a part of the brain that controls how motivated mice are to exercise, according to a new study.

Francie Diep
at 09:27 AM Aug 29 2014
Andrey Rudenko

This is a castle that a man 3-D printed from concrete, using a printer he built himself. We like how variations in the concrete's color stretch perfectly across the castle—the product of care and engineering on the part of the maker, Andrey Rudenko. As he wrote on his website:

 
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