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  • Long Lost Beagle-2 Mars Lander Spotted By NASA Probe

    NASA Finds Lost Mars Probe

    After more than 11 years of mystery, the European Space Agency has finally found their long lost Mars lander, the Beagle-2. The tiny spacecraft was recently spotted in high-resolution images taken ... More >
  • Dark Snow Doesn't Bode Well For North America

    Is Dark Snow Bad?

    The snow in the America's Heartland isn't as "snow white" as one might hope. That's because pollution trapped in the snow is making it darker. Dark snow often contains black carbon—a ... More >
  • First Photos Of SpaceX's Failed Rocket Landing

    Photos Of SpaceX's Failed Rocket Landing

    Early this morning, Elon Musk, CEO of SpaceX, released images from the company's rocket landing attempt on Saturday. The photos show how the Falcon 9 rocket did indeed hit its intended landing ... More >
  •  For The Second Time Ever, A Cyberattack Causes Physical Damage

    How a Cyberattack Causes Physical Damage

    The terrifying specter of a future of cyberattacks is that someday, a malicious actor will reach through the internet and cause real, tangible, physical harm. It sounds like a Hollywood plot: a ... More >
  • How do Planetary Flybys Work?

    How do Planetary Flybys Work?

    Gravity assists -- flybys -- are pretty neat. These precision maneuvers that involve harnessing and using the gravity of a planet to accelerate and direct a spacecraft to its destination. It's ... More >
dmoren
at 08:05 AM Jan 29 2015
Nest
Gadgets // 

The Internet's already inextricably intertwined with our everyday lives, and it's only going to become more and more prevalent as the so-called "Internet of Things" takes off. Everything from wearables to home appliances to medical devices are going to be connected to the net, and the U.S.'s Federal Trade Commission wants manufacturers to make sure that the security and privacy of consumers is paramount.

dmoren
at 08:03 AM Jan 29 2015
Prynt
Gadgets // 

When I was a kid, Polaroid cameras were the height of technology: take a photo, it pops out of the camera, and then a minute or two later—with some optional shaking—you've got your picture in your hand. These days, all photos are essentially instantaneous, but one crowdfunded project wants to bring back the era of physical prints in your hand.

Lydia Ramsey
at 08:03 AM Jan 29 2015
Nature // 

There's a new island in the Pacific Ocean, thanks to an underwater volcano eruption that's been going on for the past month.

jching87lin
at 08:03 AM Jan 29 2015
Aminu Gamawa
Drones // 

This CCTV 7 broadcast from October 2013 shows a CH-3 UCAV firing a AR-1 anti-tank missile at a ground target. While the U.S. and allies have been reluctant to export UCAV technology, China has been far less shy, with Nigeria, Pakistan and Saudi Arabia as probable customers already.

fcdiep
at 08:03 AM Jan 29 2015
Theodor Gray
Science // 

Drop pure sodium into water, and you'll get some explosive results. You might have even seen this yourself. Sodium-in-water is a common chemistry class demonstration and scientists have a solid grasp of what's happening during the reaction. Yet one team recently discovered an additional step to the process. Just before the explosion occurs, spikes of sodium metal shoot out into the water, a team of chemists from the Czech Republic and Germany discovered.

dmoren
at 08:03 AM Jan 29 2015
World Wide Web Consortium (W3C)

I'm the de facto tech support person in my family. This means every trip to a relative's house I'm asked (among other things) whether or not to update Adobe Flash. Well, we're one step closer to sidestepping that question entirely: YouTube announced this week that it's eschewing Flash to stream HTML5 video by default.

rboyle
at 08:03 AM Jan 29 2015
J. Angel Soto-Centeno
Nature // 

About 25,000 to 3,000 years ago, land mammals died out in massive numbers from the Arctic to the Caribbean, which scientists have attributed variously to climate change and human activity. Bats weren't as susceptible as their non-flying cousins — in the Caribbean, about 18 percent of bat species died out, compared to about 80 percent of land mammals — but still, several species disappeared from entire islands.

Paul Adams
at 08:03 AM Jan 29 2015
Won AS et al. Homuncular Flexibility in Virtual Reality. Journal of Computer-mediated Communication. 2015.
Science // 

“But if it's virtual reality, why should he only use two arms? Why should he even have a humanlike form?” asks Jeremy Bailenson, director of Stanford's Virtual Human Interaction Lab...

fcdiep
at 08:03 AM Jan 29 2015
Popular Science, April 1955
Science // 

A famed physicist who was among the creators of lasers died yesterday. Charles Townes invented the MASER--short for Microwave Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation, instead of LASER's Light Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation--and filed patents for lasers as well. As implied by the name, masers amplify microwaves by using [hard crystals and powerful magnetic fields]; they often serve as key components of atomic clocks and radio telescopes.

AthertonKD
at 08:03 AM Jan 29 2015
Ludovic Daler, screenshot via YouTube
Robots // 

DALER is a flying wing that swoops like a bat in the sky, and wobbles forward like a bat on the ground. Created by Ludovic Daler, the Deployable Air-Land Exploration Robot has flexible wings that contract, angling the body so that special wing tips, which spin forward, can allow the DALER to crawl one awkward, creepy step at a time.

dmoren
at 08:02 AM Jan 29 2015
Dereau Benoît

Every time a new action film or animated movie comes out, we marvel at the amazing computer-generated effects. But those effects can be even more impressive on a small, quiet scale. Artist Benoît Dereau has created a 3D walkthrough of a Paris apartment that's mind-blowing in its sheer attention to detail and subtlety.

jching87lin
at 09:43 AM Jan 28 2015
www.top81.cn
Drones // 

This informational poster from AVIC shows the launch sequence of the artillery UAV. It's deployed from a 155mm shell (PLZ-04 howitzer) or 300mm rocket (A-100 rocket launcher), and when nearing deployment, the shell deploys a drag parachute to slow down. At the slower speed, the shell splits open so the drone can safely deploy. Despite the drone's small size, its sensors are capable enough of detecting specific targets like the M1A2 Abrams tank.

Jason Tetro
at 09:43 AM Jan 28 2015
Sources: Wikipedia; Modifications: Jason Tetro
Nature // 

There's nothing quite like that first bite of a fresh fruit. The range of aromas and flavors offer a momentary respite from everyday life and provide to body with a plethora of nutrients to improve overall health. But there is a dark side manifested in the presence of a number of speck-sized flying frustrations better known as fruit flies.

fcdiep
at 09:43 AM Jan 28 2015
Nature // 

So there are a couple of—let's say, health outcomes—that are popularly associated with unusual snowfall. One is heart attacks: It's commonly believed that shoveling snow can over-strain the heart. The other is pregnancy: Couples stuck indoors, it's thought, may find themselves in a certain mood.

AthertonKD
at 09:43 AM Jan 28 2015
Nature // 

The science of blizzards and how to overcome them have been a part of Popular Science since at least the magazine's second decade. In an 1883 treatise on poorga”, the Russian term for the same phenomenon, of a “blinding snowstorm against which nor man nor beast may stand,” never caught on the way blizzard did.

 
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