• Scientists are speed breeding plants in a race to beat climate change

    Why Scientists Are Breeding Wheat in Space

    Some years ago, NASA bred wheat in space with the goal of providing an unending food supply for astronauts. To help the plant along, astronauts shined light on the plant continuously. As far as ... More >
  • China is making 1,000-UAV drone swarms now

    China Deploys 1000-Drone Swarm

    At the close of the Global Fortune Forum in Guangzhou on Dec. 7, the event's hosts set a world record for the largest drone swarm ever deployed. For 9 minutes, 1,180 drones danced and blinked out ... More >
  • When you burn fat, where does it actually go?

    When You Burn Fat, Where Does it Actually Go?

    When you dig into your meal or grab a quick bite on the way to work, the food you eat goes toward fueling your body. As your favorite (or not so favorite) foods pass through your digestive system, ... More >
  • In his first PopSci appearance, a young Stephen Hawking explains an incredible discovery

    Stephen Hawking's First PopSci Appearance

    How will the universe end? Will it sputter out in a realm of ice, cooling continually as it expands until it reaches the absolute zero of temperature throughout its vast expanse? Will it die in a ... More >
  • Rats have been in New York City since the 1700s and they're never leaving

    The Rats of New York: 300 Years & Counting

    Since the late 1700s, Norwegian rats have haunted New York City's alleys, parks, and basements. They came on ships from France and England, and then they never left. More >
Tom Iliffe / The Conversation
at 10:20 AM Jan 16 2018
Jill Heinerth , CC BY-ND
Nature // 

The remipede Cryptocorynetes elmorei from Eleuthera, Bahamas. Remipedes are only found in deeper saltwater layers from caves on opposite sides of the Atlantic and from the Indian Ocean coast of Western Australia.

Eleanor Cummins
at 10:20 AM Jan 16 2018
Nature // 

Franklin D. Roosevelt was one of the United States's more quotable presidents. But one of his best is all too easily forgotten. In a letter to the governors of what was then just 48 states, Roosevelt wrote, “A nation that destroys its soil destroys itself.”

David Nield
at 11:40 AM Jan 10 2018
Tinder
Science // 

Gone are the days when you had to lie about meeting your significant other through a dating app. As smartphones have transformed the way we look for love, swiping left and right to choose a potential partner has gradually become the new normal. But with so many people searching for a soulmate on these apps and sites, how can you stand out from the crowd? These expert tips, inspired by advice from the app-creators themselves, will improve your chances of matching with the right person.

Claire Maldarelli
at 11:40 AM Jan 10 2018
Deposit Photos

Everyone gets gas. And (almost) everyone could stand to live without it. But figuring out what drives gas is a difficult endeavor—even for doctors. A multitude of foods can initiate gassiness, to varying degrees, depending on the individual. But a new gadget might someday help. In a paper in the journal Nature Electronics, a pair of researchers just introduced an electronic pill that can measure the different types of gas in a person's intestines.

Sara Chodosh
at 11:40 AM Jan 10 2018
Pixabay
Science // 

The National Centers for Environmental Information get a lot of, well, environmental information. They gather an immense amount of climate data, and in order to organize it all, they sit down on the 4th of every month to review everything that's come in. It was at this meeting in December 2017 that the folks at NCEI noticed something: Utqiaġvik, Alaska was missing. Not the town itself, of course, but its data. All of it.

Marlene Cimons
at 11:40 AM Jan 10 2018
Pixabay

Some years ago, NASA bred wheat in space with the goal of providing an unending food supply for astronauts. To help the plant along, astronauts shined light on the plant continuously. As far as the crop was concerned, the sun never set. It was always noon on a cloudless day. The extra light fueled its rapid growth.

Mary Beth Griggs
at 11:40 AM Jan 10 2018
Depositphotos
Fitness // 

When you dig into your meal or grab a quick bite on the way to work, the food you eat goes toward fueling your body. As your favorite (or not so favorite) foods pass through your digestive system, your body absorbs nutrients and uses them to power you through your daily routine. The remaining waste heads out through your bladder or intestines. It's a good system.

Sara Chodosh
at 10:46 AM Jan 9 2018
Nima
Gadgets // 

Prior to the night of August 10, 2017, I harbored an unabashed love for lobster mac and cheese. I realize that undercooked pasta and cheddar sauce are no real place for delicate crustacean meat, but I longed for it anyway—because there's only one restaurant I know of where I can eat it. Or at least I could, before that evening.

Kate Baggaley
at 10:46 AM Jan 9 2018
Sahar Seif
Nature // 

The garbage that seagulls had been eating included rubber bands, plastic bag shreds, chunks of Styrofoam, and wax paper from coffee cups.

Deborah Linder/The Conversation
at 10:46 AM Jan 9 2018
Susan Schmitz/shutterstock.com
Science // 

When I looked at my appointment book for the day, I thought something must be wrong. Someone who worked in the fitness industry was bringing his cat in to the Tufts Obesity Clinic for Animals. Did he confuse us for a different kind of weight management clinic? Is he looking to get muscle on his cat or maybe kitty protein shakes?

Stan Horaczek
at 10:46 AM Jan 9 2018
Columbia
Tech // 

Heading to the US to escape Australian heat? You're going from one extreme to the other. With snow falling in Florida and temperatures along the East Coast dipping well below zero, the need for a good winter jacket has never been greater. The warmth from your body wants to get out into the cold atmosphere—that's just simple thermodynamics—but a good jacket can keep it from escaping, even when the temperatures hit “polar vortex” or “bomb cyclone” levels of frigidity.

Eleanor Cummins
at 10:46 AM Jan 9 2018
Wikimedia Commons
Nature // 

Though it sounds like a factoid ripped straight from Ripley's Believe It Or Not, experts confirmed that Jacksonville, Florida really was colder than Anchorage, Alaska on Tuesday. With strange weather fronts and severe storms blowing across the country, the biggest city in the frigid “Last Frontier” state hit 49 degrees. Meanwhile, parts of the so-called “Sunshine State” only eked out a high around 41 degrees. As the Associated Press succinctly put it, the weather is currently “upside down”.

Stan Horaczek
at 10:46 AM Jan 9 2018
Swix
Tech // 

Ryan Knapp is a senior staff meteorologist and weather observer at the Mount Washington Observatory in White Mountains, New Hampshire. When we talked on the phone, the temperature at the observatory—which is at the mountain's summit— was hovering between -20 and -30 degrees. Most of us experience painfully frigid temperatures like that rarely, if ever, but it's not out of the ordinary for Knapp and the Mount Washington crew. Sitting at 6,267 feet above sea level, the facility has an average low of -4 degrees and a record low of -47 degrees. And that's before you add in the punishing winds which gust to 70 miles per hour and beyond. Brutal.

Claire Maldarelli
at 10:46 AM Jan 9 2018
Deposit Photos
Fitness // 

Every January, fat's in the crosshairs of health columnists, fitness magazines, and desperate Americans. This year, PopSci looks at the macronutrient beyond its most negative associations. What's fat good for? How do we get it to go where we want it to? Where does it wander when it's lost? This, my friends, is Fat Month.

Rachel Feltman
at 10:46 AM Jan 9 2018
DepositPhotoshttps://depositphotos.com/149698760/stock-photo-woman-drinking-water.html)
Science // 

Do you ever feel like your drinking water is just too clean? Last week, The New York Times reported on a trendy new beverage known as raw water. Yes: people are spending loads on unfiltered, untreated, and totally unsterilized spring water.

 
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