• How We Used To Talk About Measles

    How We Used To Talk About Measles

    These days, the happiest place on Earth isn't so cheerful. In December, a large number of people started coming down with measles after visiting Disneyland in California. So far, about 80 measles ... More >
  • Long Lost Beagle-2 Mars Lander Spotted By NASA Probe

    NASA Finds Lost Mars Probe

    After more than 11 years of mystery, the European Space Agency has finally found their long lost Mars lander, the Beagle-2. The tiny spacecraft was recently spotted in high-resolution images taken ... More >
  • Dark Snow Doesn't Bode Well For North America

    Is Dark Snow Bad?

    The snow in the America's Heartland isn't as "snow white" as one might hope. That's because pollution trapped in the snow is making it darker. Dark snow often contains black carbon—a ... More >
  • First Photos Of SpaceX's Failed Rocket Landing

    Photos Of SpaceX's Failed Rocket Landing

    Early this morning, Elon Musk, CEO of SpaceX, released images from the company's rocket landing attempt on Saturday. The photos show how the Falcon 9 rocket did indeed hit its intended landing ... More >
  •  For The Second Time Ever, A Cyberattack Causes Physical Damage

    How a Cyberattack Causes Physical Damage

    The terrifying specter of a future of cyberattacks is that someday, a malicious actor will reach through the internet and cause real, tangible, physical harm. It sounds like a Hollywood plot: a ... More >
Mary Beth Griggs
at 09:48 AM Jan 30 2015
Ron Miller
Space // 

The rings of Saturn are one of our most instantly recognizable images of outer space, but those beautiful rings of rock and dust now have some competition. In a paper that was recently accepted for publication in Astrophysical Journal, scientists from Leiden Observatory in the Netherlands and the University of Rochester announced that they had found a planet with rings 200 times the size of Saturn's rings, which measure a piddling 175,000 miles across.

jching87lin
at 09:48 AM Jan 30 2015
=GT at China Defense Forum
Space // 

The testing LM-7 space launch rocket its attached to the erector pad at Wenchang, China. The erector pad is attached to the rocket to keep it upright as it transits from the preparation facility out into the launch pad.

fcdiep
at 09:48 AM Jan 30 2015
Parabon NanoLabs, Inc.
Tech // 

In 2014, a biotechnology company began offering a whole new service to police departments. Virginia-based Parabon NanoLabs' Snapshot service allows police to send Parabon NanoLabs DNA samples taken from crime scenes. From that DNA, the company reconstructs a guess of what the person's face looks like.

AthertonKD
at 09:48 AM Jan 30 2015
FAA, screenshot via YouTube
Drones // 

Every day, people find new places where they shouldn't fly drones. Earlier this week, it was the White House grounds. Before that, a meth-smuggling remote control copter crashed just south of San Diego. There are even maps of where not to fly drones. Now, in a new, short PSA, the Federal Aviation Administration very clearly says where not to fly: the Super Bowl

fcdiep
at 09:48 AM Jan 30 2015
Rosa Rugani, University of Padova
Nature // 

Think about a series of numbers, 1 through 10. Chances are, you imagined the numerals in a line, in increasing order from left to right. That's the effect of your mental number line, the mental representation of numbers that research has shown basically all humans have—and, it seems, some non-humans, too. To put it another way, human adults tend to imagine numbers as being ordered in space, going a certain direction. It's a phenomenon that seems to be nearly universal. Pretty cool.

Lydia Ramsey
at 09:43 AM Jan 30 2015

These days, the happiest place on Earth isn't so cheerful. In December, a large number of people started coming down with measles after visiting Disneyland in California. So far, about 80 measles cases have been reported in the state, an unusually large number for a virus that has long been under control.

dmoren
at 08:05 AM Jan 29 2015
Nest
Gadgets // 

The Internet's already inextricably intertwined with our everyday lives, and it's only going to become more and more prevalent as the so-called "Internet of Things" takes off. Everything from wearables to home appliances to medical devices are going to be connected to the net, and the U.S.'s Federal Trade Commission wants manufacturers to make sure that the security and privacy of consumers is paramount.

dmoren
at 08:03 AM Jan 29 2015
Prynt
Gadgets // 

When I was a kid, Polaroid cameras were the height of technology: take a photo, it pops out of the camera, and then a minute or two later—with some optional shaking—you've got your picture in your hand. These days, all photos are essentially instantaneous, but one crowdfunded project wants to bring back the era of physical prints in your hand.

Lydia Ramsey
at 08:03 AM Jan 29 2015
Nature // 

There's a new island in the Pacific Ocean, thanks to an underwater volcano eruption that's been going on for the past month.

jching87lin
at 08:03 AM Jan 29 2015
Aminu Gamawa
Drones // 

This CCTV 7 broadcast from October 2013 shows a CH-3 UCAV firing a AR-1 anti-tank missile at a ground target. While the U.S. and allies have been reluctant to export UCAV technology, China has been far less shy, with Nigeria, Pakistan and Saudi Arabia as probable customers already.

fcdiep
at 08:03 AM Jan 29 2015
Theodor Gray
Science // 

Drop pure sodium into water, and you'll get some explosive results. You might have even seen this yourself. Sodium-in-water is a common chemistry class demonstration and scientists have a solid grasp of what's happening during the reaction. Yet one team recently discovered an additional step to the process. Just before the explosion occurs, spikes of sodium metal shoot out into the water, a team of chemists from the Czech Republic and Germany discovered.

dmoren
at 08:03 AM Jan 29 2015
World Wide Web Consortium (W3C)

I'm the de facto tech support person in my family. This means every trip to a relative's house I'm asked (among other things) whether or not to update Adobe Flash. Well, we're one step closer to sidestepping that question entirely: YouTube announced this week that it's eschewing Flash to stream HTML5 video by default.

rboyle
at 08:03 AM Jan 29 2015
J. Angel Soto-Centeno
Nature // 

About 25,000 to 3,000 years ago, land mammals died out in massive numbers from the Arctic to the Caribbean, which scientists have attributed variously to climate change and human activity. Bats weren't as susceptible as their non-flying cousins — in the Caribbean, about 18 percent of bat species died out, compared to about 80 percent of land mammals — but still, several species disappeared from entire islands.

Paul Adams
at 08:03 AM Jan 29 2015
Won AS et al. Homuncular Flexibility in Virtual Reality. Journal of Computer-mediated Communication. 2015.
Science // 

“But if it's virtual reality, why should he only use two arms? Why should he even have a humanlike form?” asks Jeremy Bailenson, director of Stanford's Virtual Human Interaction Lab...

fcdiep
at 08:03 AM Jan 29 2015
Popular Science, April 1955
Science // 

A famed physicist who was among the creators of lasers died yesterday. Charles Townes invented the MASER--short for Microwave Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation, instead of LASER's Light Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation--and filed patents for lasers as well. As implied by the name, masers amplify microwaves by using [hard crystals and powerful magnetic fields]; they often serve as key components of atomic clocks and radio telescopes.

 
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