• Google VR And The Quest For Wireless, Affordable Virtual Reality

    Google's Quest for Cheap Wireless VR

    Cardboard is convenient from the perspective of cost and usability, but is lacking in processing power, a method of interacting within the virtual world (save for one button on the side) or even ... More >
  • A New Robotic Surgery Tool Did Better Than Human Doctors

    Robot Surgeon "Superior" To Human Doctors

    In recent years, robots have steadily crept their way into the operating room, helping to perform procedures as humans direct their movements. Robotic devices in surgery have a lot of potential ... More >
  • Infecting Mosquitoes With Bacteria Could Help Stop Zika

    Infecting Mozzies... To Kill Zika?

    For its size, the Wolbachia bacterium packs a powerful punch. When it infects an insect, it hijacks the animal's reproductive system and ensures that it can only mate with other infected ... More >
  • Luxembourg Announces New Asteroid Mining Spacecraft: Prospector-X

    The Biggest Player in Offworld Mining is...

    The next gold rush might be the race for asteroids, and the nation-states that dominate this new industry may not be the usual suspects. After all, in space the amount of land you control on Earth ... More >
  • China Aims for Humanity's Return to the Moon in the 2030s

    China Wants Humans Back on the Moon by 2030

    Lieutenant General Zhang Yulin, deputy commander of the manned space program, announced that China would land a man on the moon in the next 15-20 years. Chinese authorities also announced their ... More >
Ryan F. Mandelbaum
at 10:16 AM May 30 2016
Ryan F. Mandelbaum
Science // 

Inside a lofty brick building on a quiet Brooklyn street, thirty of us sat around a horseshoe-shaped table with plates of grapes, almonds, bread, and pungent, sweaty cheese. Between every group of four sat six wine glasses, which we held to the light and shoved our noses into, like you would at any wine tasting. Except instead of wine, these glasses were full of honey. By the end of the night, I decided I much prefer honey tastings, if we're going to be honest.

Kelsey D. Atherton
at 10:16 AM May 30 2016
DARPA
Space // 

The Pentagon is building another space plane. It already has one, the Air Force's secretive X-37B, but DARPA, the Pentagon's future-focused project's research agency, wants another. This new space plane is the XS-1, and it has a deeply ambitious goal: deliver 3,000 pounds to orbit, every day, at a cost of $5 million for delivery.

Lindsey Kratochwill
at 10:16 AM May 30 2016
Image by Stender et al.

To determine whether a patient that's in a coma will awaken again, scientists have devised a new test using positron emission tomography (PET).

G. Clay Whittaker
at 10:16 AM May 30 2016
Texas Military Department, Flickr

After more than three decades, the doctor who invented a maneuver to save people from choking got to use it himself.

Kelsey D. Atherton
at 10:16 AM May 30 2016
U.S. Army, via Wikimedia Commons

When all you have is a gun and a bunch of missiles, every problem looks like something to blow up. The Army's Apache helicopters are very good at blowing stuff up, but there are times when they need more precision. Laser-like precision, even.

Thom Leavy
at 10:16 AM May 30 2016
John Greenlee
Make // 

If you want wireless radio that runs on free energy and is disguised as a large pizza, John Greenlee's “Crystal Radio To Go” build might pique your curiosity—you just need to find scarce supplies like germanium diodes, high-impedance earphones, and Fahnestock clips. You can print or construct a dummy pizza of your preference.

Amy Shira Teitel
at 10:16 AM May 30 2016
NASA
Space // 

Though the Apollo lunar modules were built for the sole purpose of landing two men on the surface of the Moon, their usefulness didn't end after ascending from the lunar surface. NASA used the spent spacecraft for science, directing these modules for controlled crashed into the Moon. These crashes caused moonquakes, and scientists measured the vibrations moving through the Moon and found it rings like a bell.

G. Clay Whittaker
at 10:16 AM May 30 2016
beer

A study of 125 males found less overall aggregation of amyloid beta, the main component of the plaque connected to Alzheimer's disease, in beer drinkers than in non-beer drinkers.

Lindsey Kratochwill
at 10:16 AM May 30 2016
Photo by Bjarte Hetland via Wikimedia Commons, licensed under CC by 3.0
Robots // 

Curling seems like a low-tech sport: just a broom, a heavy stone, and a sheet of ice. However, new technologies have led some curling broom companies to innovate. But there are concerns that new directional fabrics and broom designs could be giving players an advantage--they're just too good to use in competition. So much so that they're often dubbed "frankenbrooms" and have been banned from the sport.

G. Clay Whittaker
at 10:16 AM May 30 2016
Hacks // 

Vacuum cleaner-wielding superheroes are about to be taken a lot more seriously. Professional climber Sierra Blair-Coyle was the guinea pig for a daring proof of power: she crawled up the side of a 33-story building in South Korea using two vacuum cleaners.

G. Clay Whittaker
at 10:16 AM May 30 2016

New York restaurants are getting called out for giving the salt shaker a few too many taps.

Brooke Borel
at 10:16 AM May 30 2016
Brooke Borel
Science // 

Over the past few years, we've seen a surge of interest in insect-based foods. There are cricket cookies, crackers, granolas, power bars, and cocktail bitters, as well as kitchen-top insect incubators, in various stages of development, to grow your own crickets, black soldier flies, and mealworms.

Lindsey Kratochwill
at 10:16 AM May 30 2016
Courtesy Titan Pharmaceuticals

On Thursday, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved an implant designed to treat opioid dependence.

Ryan F. Mandelbaum
at 10:16 AM May 30 2016
Giorgio Minguzzi

Simonne Jones, a singer and songwriter based in Berlin, is injecting her songs with something you probably wouldn't expect: advanced physics topics. Just check out these lines from her single, Gravity:

Kelsey D. Atherton
at 10:16 AM May 30 2016
509th Operations Group, United States, via Wikimedia Commons
Science // 

Until today, no sitting President of the United States had visited Hiroshima. In August 1945, President Truman forever etched Hiroshima into American history books, and indeed that of the world, when, with a bright flash, the city became the first victim of the atomic age.

 
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